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Human Body

NEWS
September 14, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A presidential advisory committee on Monday urged an end to the ban on federally funded research using human embryos, saying such research would enable scientists to more easily study stem cells--the earliest cells from which body organs are developed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1999 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We were all, once upon a time, a cluster of stem cells. From those we grew, and all other cells in the body came to be. And as our bodies rise triumphant from daily wear and tear, intact and ready to face the world anew, it is a stock of stem cells that replenishes tissues worn by age, or lost to injury and disease. Researchers argue that stem cells show extraordinary potential for treating a broad variety of debilitating diseases--from Parkinson's to diabetes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Learning Channel's new documentary on the human body, "The Ultimate Universe," begins with a stunning visual trope. The camera pans across a human chain of being, composed of dozens of naked people standing shoulder to shoulder, each person a year older than the one before, from birth to dotage: Squirming, squalling, shy, bold, firm, fat, pubescent, pregnant, pendulous, bald, muscular, flabby, round, short, tall and senescent.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | Reuters
A Florida jury Friday found a former funeral home director guilty of abusing a human body after she cut the hand from a corpse as part of a voodoo ritual. The Manatee County Circuit Court jury of three men and three women convicted Paula Albritton, 45, after a three-day trial. Her son, Jimmie Clark, 23, pleaded no contest to the same charge last year and is serving a one-year sentence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
There may be no better outcome for a museum exhibition than being at once instructive and entertaining. One such is the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's 60-odd-work charmer "From Head to Toe: Concepts of the Body in Twentieth Century Art." You get the idea from the very first grouping. It contrasts a classic work of high theoretical seriousness, Picasso's 1908 Cubist "Head of a Woman," with Alexandra Exter's 1926 "Evening Dress"--a male puppet who looks pretty tipsy.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights activists said Tuesday that a thriving black market in body parts for transplantation has been illuminated by the arrests of two men on charges of trying to illegally sell organs from executed Chinese prisoners. The two men, Cheng Yong Wang--who told undercover investigators he had been a prosecutor on Hainan Island in China--and Xingqi Fu--a Chinese citizen living in New York--were seized after meeting with an FBI agent posing as a medical executive.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1997 | DAVID PESCOVITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the latest life-imitates-art development from the biotechnology industry, a La Jolla company has begun selling organic human body parts. The first product from Advanced Tissue Sciences is skin grown in a laboratory from a baby's foreskin. At $400 for a 2-by-3-inch piece, it's expensive. But it's worth every penny if you're suffering from severe burns or if you're suffering from a diabetic foot ulcer that won't heal and could require amputation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1997 | Hunter Drohojowska Philp, Hunter Drohojowska Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
A winding road through the hills of Malibu turns toward a pair of barn-like buildings clad in galvanized steel. Industrial but elegant, hedged by bougainvillea and horsetails, they seem the ideal residence and studio for Peter Shelton. The artist is known for his iron and steel sculptures, which often replicate elements of architecture, as well as abstracted parts of the human body.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1997 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID
When I was a kid, my father had an atlas of the human body with clear plastic sheets that you could peel away to see what was under our skin. I spent hours turning those pages looking at organs, muscle tissue and blood vessels, the skeleton and all the rest. Dad, if he were alive today, wouldn't need that set of see-through foils. Instead, he'd have a Mac or multimedia PC and a copy of "ADAM: The Inside Story," "BodyWorks" or "BodyVoyage."
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