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Human Body

SCIENCE
February 28, 2004 | Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writer
The anatomy teacher propped up half a human pelvis on the lab bench and swiveled it to give the seven medical students a different view. The chemically preserved specimen, expertly dissected, was fitted with color-coded wire tabs that identified the neatly displayed parts. The students at UC San Francisco stood a respectful distance away. They took notes. They wore street clothes.
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NEWS
February 5, 2004
Is there anything more fascinating than boogers, poop or vomit? Not to kids. That's been the experience of actress and dietitian-in-training Della Lisi, whose alter ego is game show hostess Sally Snot. Her one-hour show, "Gross Me Out!" asks, and answers, the questions kids have about bodily functions. Why is urine yellow? What is ear wax? The point of the show isn't to be disgusting.
SCIENCE
September 16, 2003 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
On a lazy Friday afternoon last year my doctor informed me that I was missing a major internal organ. "Everything is normal except for the absent left kidney," he said, referring to a recent ultrasound examination. I was stunned -- then downright disbelieving. It seemed ridiculous that I could have lived 43 years without knowing this. The doctor quickly allayed some fears.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
Government regulators told Johns Hopkins University on Monday that the school may resume medical research on humans, four days after the regulators halted such studies because of the death of a volunteer. Some studies will have to be reviewed first. The federal Office for Human Research Protection approved a plan reached with the university to correct deficiencies found after the June 2 death of a healthy 24-year-old during an asthma experiment.
HEALTH
March 12, 2001 | JONATHAN FIELDING and VALERIE ULENE
Imagine what it would be like to have a serious disease--obvious to everyone around you--that you couldn't recognize yourself. That's the problem for people with alcoholism or alcohol dependence. They not only deny that they have a problem with alcohol, but also actually believe this is true. People with alcoholism experience such powerful cravings for alcohol that their lives revolve around getting and consuming it.
HEALTH
February 12, 2001 | Rosie Mestel
A week or so ago, I wrote about why backs can go bad with old age. Turns out the March issue of Scientific American--in the stores later this month--has a whole article about the design of the human body and why it fails us in later years. Bodies, the authors say, simply weren't designed to last that long. "If you look at the human body from the perspective of an engineer, we're operating those machines well beyond their warranty periods," says lead author S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2001 | SUNIL DUTTA, Sunil Dutta is an officer in the LAPD's West Valley Division
American culture is obsessed with youth. The message on commercials and advertisements is inescapable: Young is beautiful, being old is a disease. Scientists consistently promise us that their research will reverse aging. Pharmaceuticals furnish us with pills and creams to remove wrinkles. We love the smooth and flexible skin of teenage bodies; we crave the strong muscles and high energy of youth.
HEALTH
January 10, 2000 | Rosie Mestel
The other day we spent a few hours surfing the Net in our quest to learn more about health and the human body. First, we visited an exciting-sounding Web site--the "Wonderful Multicoloured Intestine Creator!"--and painted a "medically correct" image of the human bowel. (If you've ever wondered what an undulating colon looks like in fuchsia or turquoise, then http://www.urban75.com/Mag/shock1.html is the site for you. OK, so we didn't learn much here.
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A presidential advisory committee on Monday urged an end to the ban on federally funded research using human embryos, saying such research would enable scientists to more easily study stem cells--the earliest cells from which body organs are developed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1999 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We were all, once upon a time, a cluster of stem cells. From those we grew, and all other cells in the body came to be. And as our bodies rise triumphant from daily wear and tear, intact and ready to face the world anew, it is a stock of stem cells that replenishes tissues worn by age, or lost to injury and disease. Researchers argue that stem cells show extraordinary potential for treating a broad variety of debilitating diseases--from Parkinson's to diabetes.
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