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Human Body

HEALTH
February 12, 2001 | Rosie Mestel
A week or so ago, I wrote about why backs can go bad with old age. Turns out the March issue of Scientific American--in the stores later this month--has a whole article about the design of the human body and why it fails us in later years. Bodies, the authors say, simply weren't designed to last that long. "If you look at the human body from the perspective of an engineer, we're operating those machines well beyond their warranty periods," says lead author S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2001 | SUNIL DUTTA, Sunil Dutta is an officer in the LAPD's West Valley Division
American culture is obsessed with youth. The message on commercials and advertisements is inescapable: Young is beautiful, being old is a disease. Scientists consistently promise us that their research will reverse aging. Pharmaceuticals furnish us with pills and creams to remove wrinkles. We love the smooth and flexible skin of teenage bodies; we crave the strong muscles and high energy of youth.
HEALTH
January 10, 2000 | Rosie Mestel
The other day we spent a few hours surfing the Net in our quest to learn more about health and the human body. First, we visited an exciting-sounding Web site--the "Wonderful Multicoloured Intestine Creator!"--and painted a "medically correct" image of the human bowel. (If you've ever wondered what an undulating colon looks like in fuchsia or turquoise, then http://www.urban75.com/Mag/shock1.html is the site for you. OK, so we didn't learn much here.
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A presidential advisory committee on Monday urged an end to the ban on federally funded research using human embryos, saying such research would enable scientists to more easily study stem cells--the earliest cells from which body organs are developed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1999 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We were all, once upon a time, a cluster of stem cells. From those we grew, and all other cells in the body came to be. And as our bodies rise triumphant from daily wear and tear, intact and ready to face the world anew, it is a stock of stem cells that replenishes tissues worn by age, or lost to injury and disease. Researchers argue that stem cells show extraordinary potential for treating a broad variety of debilitating diseases--from Parkinson's to diabetes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Learning Channel's new documentary on the human body, "The Ultimate Universe," begins with a stunning visual trope. The camera pans across a human chain of being, composed of dozens of naked people standing shoulder to shoulder, each person a year older than the one before, from birth to dotage: Squirming, squalling, shy, bold, firm, fat, pubescent, pregnant, pendulous, bald, muscular, flabby, round, short, tall and senescent.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | Reuters
A Florida jury Friday found a former funeral home director guilty of abusing a human body after she cut the hand from a corpse as part of a voodoo ritual. The Manatee County Circuit Court jury of three men and three women convicted Paula Albritton, 45, after a three-day trial. Her son, Jimmie Clark, 23, pleaded no contest to the same charge last year and is serving a one-year sentence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
There may be no better outcome for a museum exhibition than being at once instructive and entertaining. One such is the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's 60-odd-work charmer "From Head to Toe: Concepts of the Body in Twentieth Century Art." You get the idea from the very first grouping. It contrasts a classic work of high theoretical seriousness, Picasso's 1908 Cubist "Head of a Woman," with Alexandra Exter's 1926 "Evening Dress"--a male puppet who looks pretty tipsy.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights activists said Tuesday that a thriving black market in body parts for transplantation has been illuminated by the arrests of two men on charges of trying to illegally sell organs from executed Chinese prisoners. The two men, Cheng Yong Wang--who told undercover investigators he had been a prosecutor on Hainan Island in China--and Xingqi Fu--a Chinese citizen living in New York--were seized after meeting with an FBI agent posing as a medical executive.
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