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BUSINESS
September 4, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
On Labor Day, 1995, the reward for being human capital in America--a typical worker--is undeniably on the decline. Pay raises are minimal or nonexistent, despite the relatively low unemployment rate. Unions' power continues to erode. The frenzy of corporate mergers and outsourcing of work is intensifying the threat to job security. Now contrast the average worker's plight with the status of American financial capital--that is, invested dollars. U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The world's gender gap narrowed slightly in 2013, improving in 86 of 133 countries ranked by the World Economic Forum.  Iceland, Finland and Norway were the top-ranking countries, having closed more than 80% of its gender gap, the report said. The United States was No. 23 at 74%. The score is the percentage of gap that has been closed between men and women. The U.S. is behind countries that included Nicaragua, Cuba and Britain. The annual report by the Swiss nonprofit foundation examines gender gaps in four key areas -- economic participation and opportunity, political empowerment, economic equality and health and survival.  PHOTOS: Best and worst countries in which to grow old “Countries will need to start thinking of human capital very differently -- including how they integrate women into leadership roles," said Klaus Schwab, chairman of the World Economic Forum.  A regional analysis by the report's authors found many disparities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992 | ROBERT B. REICH, Robert B. Reich teaches political economy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is one of the architects of Gov. Clinton's new economic plan.
Bill Clinton's new economic plan "has been contrived strictly for media consumption," says Richard G. Darman, the Bush Administration's budget director. "Strictly analyzed, it is transparently a phony." Strictly analyzed, Darman's criticism is transparently a phony.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp, Los Angeles Times
- Lena Dunham finally moved out of her parents' house last year, buying a modest, one-bedroom apartment in Brooklyn Heights. It's her first place all her own, full of pillows and trophies, located on the top floor of an old building where Dunham is surrounded by elderly neighbors, people the 27-year-old creator and star of the HBO comedy "Girls" calls her "emotional demographic. " "I love them," Dunham says, "though some of them are constantly consternated with me coming home at 10 p.m. They think you're a hooker if you're out past 9:30.
OPINION
August 31, 2011 | By Matthew Continetti
Where's Horatio Alger when you need him? When the caucuses and primaries arrive in 2012, Republican voters will be choosing among candidates who embody the promise of American life. Rick Perry and Michele Bachmann, both of whom came from humble beginnings, exemplify the continued possibility of social mobility. And Mitt Romney leads the life that many of us would like to have: wealth, a large family and multiple homes. What none of these candidates has done so far, though, is champion a social mobility agenda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996
A society that invests capital in an overvalued stock market is likely to be a society that undervalues its human capital. J.V. HUGHES Laguna Hills
BUSINESS
February 12, 2012 | By Andrew Hill
Throughout industrial history, managers have tried to use science to analyze, categorize and, occasionally, pulverize the human element in their ventures so they can direct it more easily to their ends. Charles Dickens memorably satirized this desire in the character of Thomas Gradgrind, the utilitarian educationalist in "Hard Times," who was determined to "teach these boys and girls nothing but facts" and "to weigh and measure any parcel of human nature, and tell you exactly what it comes to. " A new book, "Calculating Success: How the New Workplace Analytics Will Revitalize Your Organization," advocates a similarly fact-based approach to workplace challenges.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton
Maybe Los Angeles isn't so laid-back after all. In a comparison of the 120 most “competitive” cities worldwide, Los Angeles ranks 19 th in a new report . The report commissioned by Citigroup analyzes cities based on eight criteria, including economic strength, global appeal and human capital. Rankings of individual cities are here . New York claimed the top spot, followed by London, Singapore and Hong Kong. Among U.S. cities, Chicago was ninth, Boston was 10 th and, in an unkind cut for L.A., San Francisco was tied for 13 th . L.A. ranked above-average in all but one category, ranking a lowly 94 th in “environmental and natural hazards,” presumably because of earthquake risks.
OPINION
July 9, 2012 | By Paul Tipton
The announcement last week of the first definitive evidence of a new particle, likely the long-awaited Higgs boson, has a lot to teach us - and not all of it is about science. It took an international team funded by the global community of taxpayers to bring it about. To be sure the science is extremely exciting. The Higgs was first proposed in the 1960s and is thought to be the remnant of a ubiquitous interaction common to all objects with mass. As lofty and ethereal as these ideas are, the Higgs discovery, as with all scientific discoveries, is solidly grounded in concrete, observable phenomena.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The world's gender gap narrowed slightly in 2013, improving in 86 of 133 countries ranked by the World Economic Forum.  Iceland, Finland and Norway were the top-ranking countries, having closed more than 80% of its gender gap, the report said. The United States was No. 23 at 74%. The score is the percentage of gap that has been closed between men and women. The U.S. is behind countries that included Nicaragua, Cuba and Britain. The annual report by the Swiss nonprofit foundation examines gender gaps in four key areas -- economic participation and opportunity, political empowerment, economic equality and health and survival.  PHOTOS: Best and worst countries in which to grow old “Countries will need to start thinking of human capital very differently -- including how they integrate women into leadership roles," said Klaus Schwab, chairman of the World Economic Forum.  A regional analysis by the report's authors found many disparities.
OPINION
July 9, 2012 | By Paul Tipton
The announcement last week of the first definitive evidence of a new particle, likely the long-awaited Higgs boson, has a lot to teach us - and not all of it is about science. It took an international team funded by the global community of taxpayers to bring it about. To be sure the science is extremely exciting. The Higgs was first proposed in the 1960s and is thought to be the remnant of a ubiquitous interaction common to all objects with mass. As lofty and ethereal as these ideas are, the Higgs discovery, as with all scientific discoveries, is solidly grounded in concrete, observable phenomena.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton
Maybe Los Angeles isn't so laid-back after all. In a comparison of the 120 most “competitive” cities worldwide, Los Angeles ranks 19 th in a new report . The report commissioned by Citigroup analyzes cities based on eight criteria, including economic strength, global appeal and human capital. Rankings of individual cities are here . New York claimed the top spot, followed by London, Singapore and Hong Kong. Among U.S. cities, Chicago was ninth, Boston was 10 th and, in an unkind cut for L.A., San Francisco was tied for 13 th . L.A. ranked above-average in all but one category, ranking a lowly 94 th in “environmental and natural hazards,” presumably because of earthquake risks.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2012 | By Andrew Hill
Throughout industrial history, managers have tried to use science to analyze, categorize and, occasionally, pulverize the human element in their ventures so they can direct it more easily to their ends. Charles Dickens memorably satirized this desire in the character of Thomas Gradgrind, the utilitarian educationalist in "Hard Times," who was determined to "teach these boys and girls nothing but facts" and "to weigh and measure any parcel of human nature, and tell you exactly what it comes to. " A new book, "Calculating Success: How the New Workplace Analytics Will Revitalize Your Organization," advocates a similarly fact-based approach to workplace challenges.
OPINION
August 31, 2011 | By Matthew Continetti
Where's Horatio Alger when you need him? When the caucuses and primaries arrive in 2012, Republican voters will be choosing among candidates who embody the promise of American life. Rick Perry and Michele Bachmann, both of whom came from humble beginnings, exemplify the continued possibility of social mobility. And Mitt Romney leads the life that many of us would like to have: wealth, a large family and multiple homes. What none of these candidates has done so far, though, is champion a social mobility agenda.
OPINION
September 6, 2010 | By Thomas A. Kochan
On the eve of the Depression, Andrew Mellon, President Hoover's Treasury secretary, said that rising unemployment would be good for the nation because it would "purge the rottenness out of the system" and force people "to work harder, live a more moral life. " Few would dare utter such words today, but the actions — or inactions — of Washington and Wall Street indicate that respect for work and workers is again approaching that dismal level. American workers and families face the deepest jobs crisis of their lives.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | AMY WILSON, FAST COMPANY
Russell J. Campanello, 44, is that rare breed of human resources executive--an innovator and power player in a function that still plays second fiddle. This summer, he was named chief people officer at NerveWire Inc., an Internet professional services firm based near Boston. Previously, he spent nine years as vice president of HR at Lotus Development Corp. Most recently, he served as senior vice president of HR at the high-profile biotech company Genzyme Corp.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | AMY WILSON, FAST COMPANY
Russell J. Campanello, 44, is that rare breed of human resources executive--an innovator and power player in a function that still plays second fiddle. This summer, he was named chief people officer at NerveWire Inc., an Internet professional services firm based near Boston. Previously, he spent nine years as vice president of HR at Lotus Development Corp. Most recently, he served as senior vice president of HR at the high-profile biotech company Genzyme Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991 | GEORGE WEIGEL, George Weigel is president of the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington.
C entesimus Annus, Pope John Paul II's new social encyclical, is a watershed event in modern religious thought about freedom. In its concerns for workers' rights, for families and voluntary associations, and for religious liberty, and in its endorsement of democracy, the Pope develops classic themes of papal teaching about the modern economy and the modern state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996
A society that invests capital in an overvalued stock market is likely to be a society that undervalues its human capital. J.V. HUGHES Laguna Hills
BUSINESS
September 4, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
On Labor Day, 1995, the reward for being human capital in America--a typical worker--is undeniably on the decline. Pay raises are minimal or nonexistent, despite the relatively low unemployment rate. Unions' power continues to erode. The frenzy of corporate mergers and outsourcing of work is intensifying the threat to job security. Now contrast the average worker's plight with the status of American financial capital--that is, invested dollars. U.S.
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