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Human Development

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BUSINESS
January 4, 1988 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
At corporations across the Southland, human capital--sometimes slighted in the competitive rush to upgrade technology--has become the object of substantial investment. Lockheed has launched the Lockheed Technical Institute, an in-house program of graduate-level courses that provided 850 employees in Burbank with state-of-the-art engineering expertise in the latest semester.
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SCIENCE
March 20, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Why do our eyes open wide when we feel fear or narrow to slits when we express disgust? According to new research, it has to do with survival. In a paper published Thursday in the journal Psychological Science, researchers concluded that expressions of fear and disgust altered the way human eyes gather and focus light. They argued that these changes were the result of evolutionary development and were intended to help humans survive, or at least detect, very different threats.
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NEWS
March 31, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Scientists today announced the discovery of the first essentially complete skull of what may be humanity's earliest known ancestor--an agile ape-like creature whose descendants developed language, discovered fire and, eventually, invented power tools.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Poets say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. Researchers are finding that they are also windows to our sexual identity. The dilation of pupils in response to erotic stimuli may be the most accurate objective measure of an individual's sexuality, researchers reported Monday. The findings confirm a long-held belief among sexual researchers that has apparently not been studied in any depth before. The results provide new insight into the evolutionary development of human sexual responses, suggesting that women may have evolved a more responsive sexuality to help them cope with forced copulation.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Development Program on Wednesday ranked Japan and Canada as the countries leading the world in human development, their peoples enjoying greater economic and social benefits than anyone else. The United States was ranked seventh. The rankings came in an annual report on human development in which the U.N. agency called for great changes in the way developing countries spend money on their growth and in the way industrialized nations allocate foreign aid to the Third World.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In the arid badlands of Ethiopia, researchers have uncovered evidence that humanity's direct ancestors used tools 2.3 million years ago, offering a new clue to a crucial hidden chapter of human development, the Berkeley-based archeologists announced today.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Poets say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. Researchers are finding that they are also windows to our sexual identity. The dilation of pupils in response to erotic stimuli may be the most accurate objective measure of an individual's sexuality, researchers reported Monday. The findings confirm a long-held belief among sexual researchers that has apparently not been studied in any depth before. The results provide new insight into the evolutionary development of human sexual responses, suggesting that women may have evolved a more responsive sexuality to help them cope with forced copulation.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Why do our eyes open wide when we feel fear or narrow to slits when we express disgust? According to new research, it has to do with survival. In a paper published Thursday in the journal Psychological Science, researchers concluded that expressions of fear and disgust altered the way human eyes gather and focus light. They argued that these changes were the result of evolutionary development and were intended to help humans survive, or at least detect, very different threats.
NEWS
June 19, 1990
Narrowing the Gap While there are still horrendous gaps in the level of development between the First and Third Worlds, some gaps have closed during the last four decades. The Infant Mortality Rate: Deaths per 1,000 live births 1950: 200 1985: 79 The Literacy Gap: In percentage points 1970: 54 1985: 40 The Life Expectancy Gap: In years 1960: 23 1987: 12 1.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | LYNN SMITH
Scout leaders, teachers and clergy may all contribute to instilling the desire in children to help others. But nobody can do it like a parent, according to family studies expert Urie Bronfenbrenner, a professor at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. "The more we study human development, the more it becomes clear the family is the most powerful, most humane and, by far, the most economical way of making human beings human," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Borrego Springs, Calif. -- The mood was buoyant and boosterish when the Borrego Desert Club had its grand opening party on Feb. 17, 1950. The luau went on for three days. Hawaiian singer Hilo Hattie provided the entertainment. Moneyed couples enjoyed the panoramic view of the desert and the glistening stars. A photographer for Life magazine was there to capture the fun. Designed by noted La Jolla architect William Kesling — known for his Streamline Moderne style — the Desert Club was envisioned by boosters as the social hub of an upscale resort community that would rival Palm Springs as a desert playground for the rich.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2008 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
A controversial, estrogen-like chemical in plastic could be harming the development of children's brains and reproductive organs, a federal health agency concluded in a report released Tuesday. The National Toxicology Program, part of the National Institutes of Health, concluded that there was "some concern" that fetuses, babies and children were in danger because bisphenol A, or BPA, harmed animals at low levels found in nearly all human bodies.
NEWS
January 29, 2006 | Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun
Since daybreak he has been scanning the treetops for the creatures that move as if by pogo stick and look as if they wear white fur coats and face masks. It is after 2 p.m. and the dense, hilly rain forest has yet to give primatologist Erik Patel a glimpse of Propithecus candidus, the rare monkey-like lemur known as the silky sifaka. It is one of the world's 25 most endangered primates. Fewer than 1,000 silky sifakas are thought to exist, all of them in this rugged patch of Madagascar.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A chimp-sized human ancestor walked upright 6 million years ago, far earlier than other known species with a human-like gait, researchers reported Thursday. CT scans of the top of a fossil thighbone show that the creature walked upright. The researchers' findings, published in Friday's issue of the journal Science, take the dawn of human gait back another 3 million years from "Lucy," who had been the earliest known prehuman to have walked on two legs.
SCIENCE
August 19, 2002 | EMILY SINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You've probably received e-mail messages just like this one: A stranger has lots of money in a Nigerian bank account and you can have half of it--if you just provide your account information to help make the bank transfer. Most people who have encountered the Nigerian bank scam are automatically skeptical of such a request--and there could be a good reason that goes far beyond common sense.
NEWS
March 3, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Archeologists have discovered the oldest stone axes ever found in Asia, 800,000-year-old implements that hint at the minds that painstakingly shaped them at the dawn of humanity. The findings provide provocative evidence of the beginnings of cultural diversity, which, like toolmaking itself, is today the hallmark of humankind. The discovery is also certain to force many researchers to reconsider the pace of human development in Asia, which until now has been considered an evolutionary backwater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1991
Regarding "Convicts Star in Campaign Against Gangs," Aug. 29: Just what we need, another asinine idea for crime deterrence. With all the available knowledge on human development, how could any educated person offer this ignorant approach to the serious problem of the antisocial behavior of some of our youth? I've worked with young people for nearly 50 years--many of those years in L.A.'s inner city schools, and spent much time learning about human development needs and processes. First, before you try to fix people, one learns that punishment, ridicule, fear, and intimidation do not fix them.
MAGAZINE
November 27, 1994
Oliver North ("The Democrats' Ultimate Nightmare," by Nina J. Easton, Oct. 23), is a thief (he admits stealing and shredding government documents), a liar (he admits lying to Congress) and a traitor (he sold weapons to a country, Iran, that had kidnaped and imprisoned U.S. citizens). He broke the law by sending profits from the illegal sale to the exiled army of the ousted dictator of Nicaragua. Then the unrepentant North wanted to join the Congress he scorned. The Christian coalition that raised millions for North's campaign presents a warning to all Americans, and especially to mainstream Christians, that a right-wing force bordering on neo-Fascism poses an increasing threat to the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1997
Research into human behavior often has a wonderful way of validating common sense or intuitive understanding. As all caring mothers and fathers know, infants like to be held and caressed, and they tend to be happier for that. Now studies show how the absence of tactile contact can make not just for a cranky baby but for changes in the child's brain biochemistry. That in turn can lead to lifelong intellectual, behavioral and physical problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1997 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seems that just about everyone in Wilmington has an opinion about the future of a barely two-acre patch of dusty, weed-strewn land littered with garbage. Maria de la Luz Mosqueda stands inside her cramped two-bedroom apartment, gazes across the street and sees the nearly unimaginable--a new house for her family of six children, ages 11 months to 23 years.
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