Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHuman Family Institute
IN THE NEWS

Human Family Institute

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1993
Writers from "Roseanne" and "I'll Fly Away" were among the winners Wednesday of the annual Humanitas Prizes for "humanizing achievement in television writing," as $95,000 in awards were handed out by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Institute.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1994
Episodes of "Picket Fences," "NYPD Blue" and "Law & Order" were among the finalists announced Thursday for the annual Humanitas Prizes, given to writers whose screen work "enriches and enlightens" audiences. The cash awards, given by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Educational and Cultural Institute, in the past have been given only to TV writers, but they are expanding this year to include feature films.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Following a controversial television season that won the dubious honor of spawning the term "trash TV," Father Ellwood Kieser, president of the Human Family Institute, believes it is more important than ever to remind the television industry that it can produce commercially successful TV without sacrificing its commitment to enrich the viewer. So, during the month of June, the Pacific Palisades-based institute, a group that rewards television programming that "affirms the dignity of the human person" with its annual Humanitas Prizes, will join with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the awards with "15 Years of Excellence: The Humanitas Prize," a retrospective of past winners.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1993
Writers from "Roseanne" and "I'll Fly Away" were among the winners Wednesday of the annual Humanitas Prizes for "humanizing achievement in television writing," as $95,000 in awards were handed out by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
ABC's Emmy-winning series "The Wonder Years" and "China Beach," a CBS Schoolbreak Special entitled "My Past Is My Own," an installment of ABC's "New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh" and an ABC documentary on breast cancer, "Destined to Live," were all winners in the 15th annual Humanitas Prize competition, announced Thursday at the Century Plaza.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1990 | ALEENE MacMINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A CBS television movie about school desegregation in Boston and episodes of two popular ABC series, "thirtysomething" and "The Wonder Years," took cash awards Wednesday as the 16th annual Humanitas Prizes were bestowed for "humanizing achievement" in television writing. "Common Ground, Part II," which aired last March on CBS, won Edward Hume $25,000 for his teleplay depicting the tension surrounding the mandated desegregation of Boston's public schools in the 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1994
Episodes of "Picket Fences," "NYPD Blue" and "Law & Order" were among the finalists announced Thursday for the annual Humanitas Prizes, given to writers whose screen work "enriches and enlightens" audiences. The cash awards, given by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Educational and Cultural Institute, in the past have been given only to TV writers, but they are expanding this year to include feature films.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1985
The writers of TV movies about teen-age drug abuse, teen-age suicide and a woman struggling to raise her family during World War II have been nominated for the top award in the 1985 Humanitas Prizes, given for TV programs that "most fully communicate human values." Winners of the 11th annual Humanitas awards, given by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Institute, will be announced Tuesday at a luncheon in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An ABC television movie about a custody battle over a mentally handicapped woman who wins the state lottery and episodes of two popular ABC series, the canceled "thirtysomething" and "The Wonder Years," took cash awards Tuesday when the 17th annual Humanitas Prizes were bestowed for "humanizing achievement" in television writing. The awards were presented during a luncheon at the Century Plaza.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1988 | TAMMY SIMS
A documentary about the mentally ill, a TV movie about the homeless and a children's special about a handicapped teen-ager were among five ABC programs that won Humanitas Prizes Thursday for "humanizing achievement in television writing." An episode of CBS' "Frank's Place," written by series creator Hugh Wilson, was the only winner from another network. The winners were announced at a luncheon at the Century Plaza.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1990 | ALEENE MacMINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A CBS television movie about school desegregation in Boston and episodes of two popular ABC series, "thirtysomething" and "The Wonder Years," took cash awards Wednesday as the 16th annual Humanitas Prizes were bestowed for "humanizing achievement" in television writing. "Common Ground, Part II," which aired last March on CBS, won Edward Hume $25,000 for his teleplay depicting the tension surrounding the mandated desegregation of Boston's public schools in the 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
ABC's Emmy-winning series "The Wonder Years" and "China Beach," a CBS Schoolbreak Special entitled "My Past Is My Own," an installment of ABC's "New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh" and an ABC documentary on breast cancer, "Destined to Live," were all winners in the 15th annual Humanitas Prize competition, announced Thursday at the Century Plaza.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Following a controversial television season that won the dubious honor of spawning the term "trash TV," Father Ellwood Kieser, president of the Human Family Institute, believes it is more important than ever to remind the television industry that it can produce commercially successful TV without sacrificing its commitment to enrich the viewer. So, during the month of June, the Pacific Palisades-based institute, a group that rewards television programming that "affirms the dignity of the human person" with its annual Humanitas Prizes, will join with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the awards with "15 Years of Excellence: The Humanitas Prize," a retrospective of past winners.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1988
The writers of two episodes of the long-running "Cagney & Lacey" show and an installment of the first-year series "thirtysomething" have been nominated for the $15,000 award in the annual Humanitas Prizes for "humanizing achievement in television writing." A total of $70,000 in prizes is given out each year by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Institute to the writers of TV entertainment programs who are judged to have done the best job of communicating enriching values to the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1989
For the first time in its 15-year history, judges for the Humanitas Prize for humanizing achievement in television writing did not nominate any programs in the $25,000 category for TV movies, saying that none was worthy. "In the opinion of the judges, this was an excellent year in the half-hour and the hour categories. . . . But in our opinion it was a disappointing year in the long-form category," said Father Ellwood Kieser, president of the Human Family Institute. "We found a number of good movies of the week, but no great ones."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|