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Human Gene Therapy

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NEWS
October 8, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key federal advisory committee Monday approved experimental use of gene therapy in attempts to develop a "cancer vaccine" that would immunize patients against their own tumors. The National Institutes of Health Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee sanctioned the proposal by Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, chief of surgery at the National Cancer Institute, who is considered a pioneer in human gene-therapy cancer research.
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NEWS
February 19, 2000 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Caltech president David Baltimore this week voiced one of the most ringing condemnations by a prominent scientist of human gene therapy, suggesting that it was premature to be testing the experimental technique in people. "I disagree we've had value from gene therapy trials so far . . . " Baltimore said, referring to the roughly 300 human studies since 1990.
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NEWS
August 1, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key federal advisory panel Tuesday approved two ground-breaking research experiments involving the first use of human gene therapy in this country to treat life-threatening disease, including an often-fatal type of cancer. "This is truly an historic occasion," said Gerard J. McGarrity, chairman of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee of the National Institutes of Health, which evaluated and approved the proposals.
NEWS
January 22, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration called a halt to human gene therapy research at the University of Pennsylvania on Friday after an investigation into the death in September of an 18-year-old patient found numerous violations by university scientists. The inquiry found serious lapses by the study's principal researchers in reporting potentially serious side effects--seen before the patient died--and in other procedures involving entry criteria and informed consent.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health on Tuesday performed the first experiment using human gene therapy to create a "cancer vaccine" that they hope will "immunize" patients against their own tumors. Dr. Steven A.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An advisory committee to the National Institutes of Health, while endorsing the "extraordinary potential" of human gene therapy for the treatment of serious diseases, urged Thursday that federally funded research shift its emphasis away from human experiments and back to the laboratory.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Scientists sought permission today for the first attempt at human gene therapy--research that will involve children stricken by a rare, inherited immune disorder that has forced some to live in plastic bubbles. In a proposal filed with federal review committees, National Institutes of Health researchers said they want to correct the children's illness, caused by the failure of a defective gene to make a vital enzyme, by inserting correct copies of the gene into their white blood cells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a move that is widely perceived as a coup for USC, a pioneer in the emerging field of human gene therapy and his wife, a highly regarded pediatric surgeon, will join the school this fall. Dr. W. French Anderson, a molecular biologist who was the first U.S. scientist to conduct approved gene therapy for the treatment of genetic disorders, will move his research program to the university's Kenneth J. Norris Jr. Comprehensive Cancer Center in September. Dr. Kathryn D.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
What's a cure for diabetes worth? How much would you pay for a single shot that forever frees you from ulcers? Should a pharmaceutical company be allowed to charge a fortune for an anti-cancer vaccine that only costs a few cents to "make"? The emerging field of human gene therapy offers perhaps the most exciting possibilities for profound and painless treatment of human ills.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | United Press International
The first government-authorized attempts at human gene therapy cleared a crucial hurdle Monday, and researchers said it meant that sick children and cancer patients may be able to benefit from them by year's end. The National Institutes of Health's Human Gene Therapy Subcommittee granted, 12 to 1, permission for NIH researchers W. French Anderson and Michael Blaese to use gene therapy to treat children stricken by the rare immune system disorder that afflicted the famed Texas "bubble boy."
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An advisory committee to the National Institutes of Health, while endorsing the "extraordinary potential" of human gene therapy for the treatment of serious diseases, urged Thursday that federally funded research shift its emphasis away from human experiments and back to the laboratory.
NEWS
November 2, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Cynthia Cutshall's parents never expected that she would be able to go to school. Born with a rare genetic disorder called ADA deficiency, the Canton, Ohio, girl had no functioning immune system to protect her from infections. As a result, she suffered chronic sinus problems that often led to near-fatal pneumonia, and seemed destined to live a life of wretched isolation, much like an earlier, more well-known victim of the disease, David, the "boy in the bubble" in Houston, who died at age 12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC San Diego's School of Medicine, a leading center for research into human gene therapy, has created a program designed to speed the transfer of its most advanced research into human clinical trials. "This is where we wanted to be 20 years ago when we began (gene therapy) research," Medical School Dean John Alksne said Thursday. "We're making rapid headway in research. . . . What we need to do (now) is transfer the technology to patients."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a move that is widely perceived as a coup for USC, a pioneer in the emerging field of human gene therapy and his wife, a highly regarded pediatric surgeon, will join the school this fall. Dr. W. French Anderson, a molecular biologist who was the first U.S. scientist to conduct approved gene therapy for the treatment of genetic disorders, will move his research program to the university's Kenneth J. Norris Jr. Comprehensive Cancer Center in September. Dr. Kathryn D.
NEWS
June 10, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In the latest advance in the genetics revolution, physicians have directly inserted a gene into humans in an attempt to cure a deadly disease, University of Michigan researchers announced Tuesday. The researchers injected the gene, encased in small globules of fat, directly into the tumor of a 67-year-old woman with metastatic melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, in hopes that the added gene would stimulate the immune system to attack tumor cells.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
When the "war on cancer" was declared by President Richard M. Nixon 20 years ago, researchers had a depressing mantra: "Cancer is not one disease, but 100." No single cure for cancer will be found, they said. We will have to go through the long and agonizing process of finding a separate cure for each one. But a series of startling and unexpected discoveries over the past half-decade have brought a marked change in that view.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers Tuesday began the first experiments using human gene therapy to treat cancer, the National Institutes of Health announced. A 29-year-old woman and a 42-year-old man with advanced melanoma, a potentially lethal form of skin cancer, received transfusions of special cancer-killing cells removed from their own tumors, along with a gene that has been coded to produce a powerful anti-tumor toxin. The hope is that the mixture will destroy the patients' cancers.
NEWS
April 13, 1986 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
On first glance, Laura Cay Boren looks like any normal 3-year-old. But all her life she has been severely ill, suffering with a rare immune deficiency disease that leaves her vulnerable to many life-threatening infections. Because of this inherited condition, Laura Cay cannot go to school or even play with other children. She learns the numbers and the alphabet from her mother. She leaves her Shelbyville, Ky., home only for visits to the doctor or the hospital.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
If a Nobel Prize is ever awarded for research on the genetics of cancer, the most likely recipient, many scientists agree, is Bert Vogelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. His research on the development of colorectal cancer has provided the first clear understanding of the complex pathway by which a tumor develops. "Dr.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government's effort to patent hundreds of human genes before it is understood how those genes function ignited fierce criticism Monday at a meeting of international experts. Some scientists said such a move could turn into a frantic scientific gold rush and quash cooperation among researchers. Until recently, scientists have applied for patents after they understood a gene's function in the human body and how it could be used for medications.
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