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Human Growth Hormone

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SPORTS
July 22, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
The NFL and NFL Players Assn. are once again talking about putting a test in place for human growth hormone, although those discussions have gone back and forth over the last two years with no resolution. “We are in active discussions with the NFLPA regarding the implementation of HGH testing for NFL players,” league spokesman Greg Aiello wrote Monday in a text message. “Those discussions are focused on a full resolution of any remaining issues, including the role of a population study.” According to an NFLPA email obtained by the Associated Press, the league and union have jointly hired a doctor to conduct a study on NFL players that establishes a baseline for what constitutes a positive test for HGH. The union sent the email to players to explain their blood will be drawn at the start of training camps, but that those samples will only be used to establish a population study.
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SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
That long and bitter fight to persuade a court to overturn the Alex Rodriguez suspension? Never mind, the New York Yankees' third baseman said Friday. Rodriguez dropped his lawsuits against Major League Baseball, the players union, and Commissioner Bud Selig, according to a notice of dismissal filed by his attorneys Friday. “Alex Rodriguez has done the right thing by withdrawing his lawsuit," the union said in a statement. "His decision to move forward is in everyone's best interest.” Rodriguez filed suit last month, after an arbitrator reduced his suspension from 211 games to one full season.
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SPORTS
February 28, 2010 | By Jim Peltz
The new head of the baseball players' union is taking a cautious stance toward blood tests for detecting human growth hormone in ballplayers despite this week's landmark case of a British rugby player who tested positive for the substance, which is banned by Major League Baseball. "The fact that there has been a positive [result] that an athlete has chosen not to challenge is a factor that raises the profile" of potential HGH testing in baseball, Michael Weiner , executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Assn.
SPORTS
November 20, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Alex Rodriguez has had enough of the grievance hearing that was filed in an effort to overturn his 211-game suspension for alleged violations of Major League Baseball's drug agreement and labor contract. After arbitrator Fredric Horowitz refused to order testimony from Commissioner Bud Selig, the New York Yankees third baseman reportedly slammed a table and cursed at MLB Chief Operating Officer Rob Manfred before leaving the room during the 11th day of hearings on the grievance filed by the players' association.
HEALTH
September 21, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
As many as 75,000 adults who could benefit from treatment with human growth hormone are not receiving it because their physicians are not aware of its benefits or their insurance companies will not pay for the prescriptions, according to medical specialists. At the same time, many people taking it to increase their athletic prowess or to slow aging are probably not getting any benefit and may be endangering their health, doctors representing the American Assn.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Choh Hao Li, the endocrinologist who discovered the human growth hormone and gave thousands of abnormally short children the chance for a more normal life, died Saturday in Berkeley, officials at UC San Francisco announced Tuesday. He was 74.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Human growth hormone is not the muscle-building miracle drug some athletes had hoped, researchers say. The supplements may just make them retain water, said researcher Kevin E. Yarasheski of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. His study, in the American Physiological Society's Journal of Applied Physiology, is among the latest to look at genetically engineered hormone supplements. In normal conditions, growth hormone does what its name says--stimulate development.
SPORTS
September 13, 2007 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
Baseball officials want to meet with Gary Matthews Jr., seven months after the Angels center fielder was alleged to have been sent a shipment of human growth hormone. Within the last week, as reports have linked Rick Ankiel, Troy Glaus and Jay Gibbons to orders for steroids and human growth hormone, baseball officials have requested meetings with each player. The reports all follow a national investigation into Internet drug trafficking, led by the Albany County (N.Y.) district attorney.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to end one of the biggest health-care fraud investigations ever pursued against a drug company, Genentech announced Monday that it has set aside $50 million to settle allegations that it promoted human growth hormone for uses not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The South San Francisco-based biotechnology company, in its quarterly earnings report, revealed that it had set aside the money for a potential "settlement in principle" it has negotiated with the U.S.
SPORTS
March 7, 2007 | Bill Shaikin and Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writers
Even if he has not failed a drug test, Angels center fielder Gary Matthews Jr. could be suspended for up to 80 games for his alleged involvement in the purchase of human growth hormone. In addition to a 50-game penalty for a first positive test, baseball's drug policy mandates a suspension from 60 to 80 games following a first conviction for "possession or use of any prohibited substance." The clause is triggered when a player is convicted or pleads guilty or no contest.
SPORTS
August 14, 2013 | Sam Farmer
Christian Fauria spent 13 seasons as an NFL tight end. He won two Super Bowl rings with the New England Patriots. He understands the hunger for any possible physical edge. But he said he couldn't bring himself to use human growth hormone. He did buy it though. He held the vials in his hands. He contemplated injecting himself with the banned substance, but… "Too chicken to go through with it," Fauria told The Times on Wednesday. "I did my research. I had tons of ankle problems, and I was looking for a way to get back faster.
SPORTS
August 13, 2013 | Wire reports
The NFL Players Assn. has told its members that the union "tentatively agreed" that 40 players will take blood tests for human growth hormone each week during the season, with a positive result drawing a four-game suspension. The NFLPA emailed players a memo in question-and-answer format Tuesday. The Associated Press obtained a copy. According to the email, players participating in NFL training camps this year will provide a blood sample for a "population study" to determine what level of HGH will result in penalties.
SPORTS
August 5, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
The head of the World Anti-Doping Agency on Monday praised Major League Baseball for its suspension of three-time American League most valuable player Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees through the 2014 season. WADA Director General David Howman said in a prepared statement that his agency "commends" the disciplining of 13 players associated with the Biogenesis anti-aging clinic in Florida. Even if these players did not submit positive drug tests like other Biogenesis-connected players, Howman said it was important to note how baseball investigated and disciplined the players Monday.
SPORTS
August 2, 2013 | Lance Pugmire
Major League Baseball Drug testing began: March 2003. Biggest catches: Ryan Braun (65-game suspension), Manny Ramirez (50 games), Melky Cabrera (50 games), Rafael Palmeiro, Jason Grimsley. Plus more than 30 minor leaguers and free agents in 2012. Drugs of choice: Testosterone (increases strength, speeds recovery after workouts); Adderall (attention-deficit stimulant). Strengths: In 2012, did 5,136 random drug tests (3,955 urine, 1,181 blood tests) on players. Seven tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs, 11 for stimulants.
SPORTS
July 22, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
The NFL and NFL Players Assn. are once again talking about putting a test in place for human growth hormone, although those discussions have gone back and forth over the last two years with no resolution. “We are in active discussions with the NFLPA regarding the implementation of HGH testing for NFL players,” league spokesman Greg Aiello wrote Monday in a text message. “Those discussions are focused on a full resolution of any remaining issues, including the role of a population study.” According to an NFLPA email obtained by the Associated Press, the league and union have jointly hired a doctor to conduct a study on NFL players that establishes a baseline for what constitutes a positive test for HGH. The union sent the email to players to explain their blood will be drawn at the start of training camps, but that those samples will only be used to establish a population study.
SPORTS
June 8, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Whenever the questions turn to drugs, Bud Selig has two talking points. First, Selig inevitably says that baseball has the toughest drug policy in American sports. This is true. Second, Selig points out that he commissioned the Mitchell Report and implemented all of its recommendations. This is not true. And, because of the one recommendation Selig refused to implement, all the good intentions fueling the latest crackdown on performance-enhancing drugs cannot obscure the perception of a commissioner acting in the best interests of his legacy rather than best interests of baseball.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | EMILY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1958, an American scientist managed to do what nature had failed to. He made a dwarf grow. For the first time, man had harnessed human growth hormone. By 1963, while technically still an experimental drug, the hormone was being supplied free of charge by the National Institutes of Health to pediatricians across America. For the next 22 years, the drug was administered to more than 8,000 stunted children. It worked. The children grew--collectively, more than a mile.
SPORTS
September 6, 2007 | Sam Farmer, Times Staff Writer
INDIANAPOLIS -- The last time the Indianapolis Colts played a meaningful game, they were drenched by a South Florida downpour. The last time the New Orleans Saints played one that counted, they were frozen by a bitter-cold Chicago squall. And tonight, with the eyes of the NFL watching and the climate-controlled RCA Dome tuned to a shirt-sleeve 70 degrees, a new storm is brewing -- a high-pressure system that will establish a pecking order atop the league.
SPORTS
June 8, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
Think this jaw-dropping start by Yasiel Puig is some guarantee of a Hall of Fame-caliber career? Not so fast. The three major leaguers Puig has joined in the history books with his explosive start never once became an All-Star (at least not yet). Although there has been some success, none has been of the spectacular variety. In his first five games, Puig has 10 RBI (tying him with Danny Espinosa and Jack Merson) and four home runs (tying him with Mike Jacobs) for the best starts ever.
SPORTS
January 10, 2013 | By Mike Hiserman
Major League Baseball announced Thursday that it will begin in-season blood-testing for human growth hormone and additional testing for testosterone this year. Batting leader Melky Cabrera of the San Francisco Giants and Oakland Athletics pitcher Bartolo Colon were both suspended last season after tests revealed elevated levels of testosterone. "This agreement addresses critical drug issues and symbolizes Major League Baseball's continued vigilance against synthetic human growth hormone, testosterone and other performance-enhancing substances," Commissioner Bud Selig said in a statement.
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