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Human Growth Hormones

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BUSINESS
November 20, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS and KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ending one of the most contentious legal disputes in its history, the University of California Board of Regents on Friday unanimously agreed to a $200-million settlement of a long-running patent infringement case against Genentech Inc. The lump-sum payment is believed to be the largest legal settlement for the university system and includes a $50-million "donation" toward construction of a building to be named by Genentech on UC San Francisco's new Mission Bay research campus.
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SPORTS
August 14, 2013 | Sam Farmer
Christian Fauria spent 13 seasons as an NFL tight end. He won two Super Bowl rings with the New England Patriots. He understands the hunger for any possible physical edge. But he said he couldn't bring himself to use human growth hormone. He did buy it though. He held the vials in his hands. He contemplated injecting himself with the banned substance, but… "Too chicken to go through with it," Fauria told The Times on Wednesday. "I did my research. I had tons of ankle problems, and I was looking for a way to get back faster.
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BUSINESS
November 15, 1999 | Associated Press
A reported settlement reached between biotech giant Genentech Inc. and UC San Francisco over the patent for the lucrative human growth hormone Protropin is expected to be considered by the UC Board of Regents on Thursday. Associated Press reported over the weekend that the company and UC had agreed to settle their decade-long dispute in which UC accused South San Francisco-based Genentech of stealing a patented DNA molecule and using it to develop Protropin, its top-selling product.
SPORTS
August 13, 2013 | Wire reports
The NFL Players Assn. has told its members that the union "tentatively agreed" that 40 players will take blood tests for human growth hormone each week during the season, with a positive result drawing a four-game suspension. The NFLPA emailed players a memo in question-and-answer format Tuesday. The Associated Press obtained a copy. According to the email, players participating in NFL training camps this year will provide a blood sample for a "population study" to determine what level of HGH will result in penalties.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Genentech Inc. said it plans to appeal a court ruling that invalidated one of its growth-hormone patents. U.S. District Judge Thomas Griesa in New York ruled that rival Bio-Technology General Corp. could enter the $350-million-a-year U.S. market for growth hormones, giving Genentech's Nutropin and Protropin new competition.
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
August 8, 2011 | By Sam Farmer
Reporting from Latrobe, Pa. — Ryan Clark has some pointed words for the needle. The Pittsburgh Steelers safety and player representative to the union is disappointed the players decided to allow the NFL to test blood for human growth hormone, something they had resisted for years. "I think people wanted to get a deal done so badly that it was overlooked," Clark said. "In that sense, players kind of got screwed, for lack of a better word. " Like many players, Clark said he's all for the idea of catching cheaters and wants a level playing field.
HEALTH
February 16, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Anyone seeking the fountain of youth should think twice before turning to growth hormone, a fast-growing trend in anti-aging fringe medicine. If conclusions from a study of an obscure population living in Ecuador prove true, less growth hormone ? not more ? may help prevent cancer and diabetes in old age. The discovery, published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine, backs up earlier research showing that yeast, flies and rodents live longer ? in some species, as much as 10 times longer ?
HEALTH
September 21, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
As many as 75,000 adults who could benefit from treatment with human growth hormone are not receiving it because their physicians are not aware of its benefits or their insurance companies will not pay for the prescriptions, according to medical specialists. At the same time, many people taking it to increase their athletic prowess or to slow aging are probably not getting any benefit and may be endangering their health, doctors representing the American Assn.
SPORTS
July 22, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
The NFL and NFL Players Assn. are once again talking about putting a test in place for human growth hormone, although those discussions have gone back and forth over the last two years with no resolution. “We are in active discussions with the NFLPA regarding the implementation of HGH testing for NFL players,” league spokesman Greg Aiello wrote Monday in a text message. “Those discussions are focused on a full resolution of any remaining issues, including the role of a population study.” According to an NFLPA email obtained by the Associated Press, the league and union have jointly hired a doctor to conduct a study on NFL players that establishes a baseline for what constitutes a positive test for HGH. The union sent the email to players to explain their blood will be drawn at the start of training camps, but that those samples will only be used to establish a population study.
SPORTS
July 22, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
The NFL and NFL Players Assn. are once again talking about putting a test in place for human growth hormone, although those discussions have gone back and forth over the last two years with no resolution. “We are in active discussions with the NFLPA regarding the implementation of HGH testing for NFL players,” league spokesman Greg Aiello wrote Monday in a text message. “Those discussions are focused on a full resolution of any remaining issues, including the role of a population study.” According to an NFLPA email obtained by the Associated Press, the league and union have jointly hired a doctor to conduct a study on NFL players that establishes a baseline for what constitutes a positive test for HGH. The union sent the email to players to explain their blood will be drawn at the start of training camps, but that those samples will only be used to establish a population study.
SPORTS
December 1, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Reporting from New York - The head of the World Anti-Doping Agency chided the NFL Players Assn. on Thursday for not giving a green light to testing players for human growth hormone. "It seems [the union's objection] is not based on science," WADA chief David Howman said. "You're better [off] to expose yourself to a test than decline it, because the impression you leave is that you have something to hide. " The new NFL labor contract allowed HGH testing as early as this season but only if the players' union approved the tests.
SPORTS
November 22, 2011 | By Phil Rogers
Live long enough, you'll see everything. One of America's major sports just announced a new collective bargaining agreement. It is the same one that is expanding its drug testing program to become the first to include blood testing for human growth hormone. And that sport is baseball. Where have you gone, Pete Rozelle? You too, the young David Stern? Baseball lost the 1994 World Series to civil strife between small-market clubs and large-market clubs and a 25-year war with the players union.
SPORTS
October 3, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
A new test that can detect the use of human growth hormone for up to 21 days has been endorsed by international anti-doping officials, moving a step closer to a potential breakthrough against doping at next year's London Olympics. U.S. Anti-Doping Agency Chief Executive Travis Tygart told the Associated Press on Monday that the "biomarker" test for HGH won strong consensus among doping scientists and experts from around the world who attended a London symposium on detecting growth factors.
SPORTS
August 8, 2011 | By Sam Farmer
Reporting from Latrobe, Pa. — Ryan Clark has some pointed words for the needle. The Pittsburgh Steelers safety and player representative to the union is disappointed the players decided to allow the NFL to test blood for human growth hormone, something they had resisted for years. "I think people wanted to get a deal done so badly that it was overlooked," Clark said. "In that sense, players kind of got screwed, for lack of a better word. " Like many players, Clark said he's all for the idea of catching cheaters and wants a level playing field.
SPORTS
July 13, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano
Reporting from Washington — In a Washington courtroom not far from where 11-time All-Star pitcher Roger Clemens testified before Congress, one of Major League Baseball's biggest names went on trial Wednesday before a jury of 12 ordinary citizens and a national public disgusted by performance-enhancing drug scandals that have mocked the credibility of the game. Clemens won seven Cy Young awards in a legendary career that typically would make him a lock for the Hall of Fame. But now he stands charged with perjury, obstructing Congress and making false statements for telling investigators and declaring in an open hearing three years ago that he never used steroids or HGH — a human growth hormone.
SPORTS
August 14, 2013 | Sam Farmer
Christian Fauria spent 13 seasons as an NFL tight end. He won two Super Bowl rings with the New England Patriots. He understands the hunger for any possible physical edge. But he said he couldn't bring himself to use human growth hormone. He did buy it though. He held the vials in his hands. He contemplated injecting himself with the banned substance, but… "Too chicken to go through with it," Fauria told The Times on Wednesday. "I did my research. I had tons of ankle problems, and I was looking for a way to get back faster.
SPORTS
February 28, 2010 | By Jim Peltz
The new head of the baseball players' union is taking a cautious stance toward blood tests for detecting human growth hormone in ballplayers despite this week's landmark case of a British rugby player who tested positive for the substance, which is banned by Major League Baseball. "The fact that there has been a positive [result] that an athlete has chosen not to challenge is a factor that raises the profile" of potential HGH testing in baseball, Michael Weiner , executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2011 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
The New Yorker magazine once touted former New York Mets star Lenny Dykstra as "baseball's most improbable post-career success story. " He transformed himself into a financial guru and ace stock picker, drove a Maybach and bought Wayne Gretzky's palatial estate near the Sherwood Country Club. But on Monday, Dykstra's well-documented financial collapse took another sharp turn when authorities charged him with nearly two dozen felony counts related to a scheme to obtain luxury cars and possession of cocaine, human growth hormone and Ecstasy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2011 | Maura Dolan
Retired baseball player Randy Velarde, who last played for the Oakland Athletics, testified Wednesday that Barry Bonds' former athletic trainer supplied him with performance-enhancing drugs and injected him during a series of parking lot meetings in 2002. Velarde was one of four major league ballplayers called by the prosecution in an effort to prove that Bonds lied when he told a grand jury in 2003 that he did not knowingly take steroids or human growth hormone. But Velarde and the other players have not implicated Bonds in their dealings with his athletic trainer, Greg Anderson.
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