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Human Immuno Deficiency Virus

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SPORTS
February 24, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Greg Louganis hit his head on the diving board and spilled his blood into the pool at the 1988 Olympic Games, did he have an obligation to disclose to doctors who treated him and to other athletes using the pool that he was HIV-positive?
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SCIENCE
October 15, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
Fearing that the global economic crisis could cause nations to renege on commitments to fight tuberculosis, new Nobel laureate and HIV co-discoverer Francoise Barre-Sinoussi warned that a drop in TB funding could wipe out gains made against AIDS because so many people suffer from both diseases. "We are at the period of success with antiretroviral treatment" for HIV, Barre-Sinoussi said Tuesday during a teleconference from the Pasteur Institute in Paris.
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SPORTS
November 9, 1991 | JULIE CART and RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The prominent NBA player met a beautiful young woman after a road game at a restaurant near the arena and, after a few drinks, asked if he could go home with her. She agreed, with one condition. In return for her companionship, he had to give her a pair of autographed sneakers. When they arrived at her bedroom, he fulfilled his part of the agreement, producing the shoes from his shoulder bag and signing them.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2008 | Cynthia Dizikes, Times Staff Writer
The HIV epidemic in the United States is a crisis, federal health officials told a House panel Tuesday, urging additional programs to specifically protect and educate African Americans, Latinos and gay and bisexual men -- the groups hardest hit by the virus that causes AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1992 | ROSE APODACA
A low-cost, anonymous HIV-testing program that is expected to draw at least 10,000 people begins today at five Southern California sites. The program, which organizers say is one of the most ambitious undertakings of HIV testing to date, will be conducted in Orange, Los Angeles and Riverside counties today and next Saturday. For $13, participants will receive a blood test and individual counseling before and after the test.
SPORTS
February 16, 1996 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the second time in six days, boxer Tommy Morrison was hit with a blow more devastating than any he ever took in the ring. Shortly after 1 o'clock on Thursday afternoon, Morrison, surrounded by family, friends and associates on his ranch in Jay, Okla., was told that the result of a blood test administered by his chosen physician was the same as that determined last week by the Nevada State Athletic Commission: HIV-positive. But this time, Morrison's knees didn't buckle.
NEWS
February 20, 1999 | From Associated Press
An HIV-infected woman who said she had a series of one-night stands to get "revenge" for contracting the virus from her boyfriend was sentenced Friday to 26 1/2 years in prison after changing her story in court. Pamela Wiser apologized to the men she exposed to the disease. She denied her earlier statements that she exposed them intentionally and testified that she just couldn't refuse when they asked her for sex. "I didn't know what I was thinking.
NEWS
February 4, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Researchers have tracked down the oldest known specimen of the virus that causes AIDS, a feat that has allowed them to pinpoint the beginnings of the AIDS epidemic to shortly after the end of World War II, a decade earlier than many experts had suspected. At the same time, another team has identified a new strain of HIV, a finding that some researchers speculate could eventually make identification, treatment and prevention of this disease more difficult.
SCIENCE
October 30, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
A genetic analysis of 25-year-old blood samples has outlined a new map of the AIDS virus' journey out of Africa, showing that today's most widespread subtype first emerged in Haiti in the 1960s and arrived in the United States a few years later. The analysis fills in a gap in the history of the virus, whose migration has been known in only sketchy form from its origin in Africa in the 1930s to its first detection in Los Angeles in 1981. Dr.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Equipment used during routine visits to the dentist can harbor and possibly transmit the AIDS virus if rigorous sterilization procedures are not followed, according to a study released Friday by researchers at the University of Georgia.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Disheartened by the failures of vaccines and microbicides in blocking HIV transmission, some AIDS researchers are now touting a third possibility: using existing HIV drugs prophylactically. By next year, as many as 15,000 people worldwide will be enrolled in trials to test the concept -- more than are enrolled in all vaccine and microbicide trials combined -- according to a report issued Sunday at the International AIDS Conference in Mexico City. There are seven trials underway or planned.
SCIENCE
August 3, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Federal officials have been underestimating the number of new HIV infections in the United States by 40% every year for more than a decade, a finding that indicates the U.S. epidemic is much worse than thought, researchers said Saturday. Using sophisticated testing to identify new infections, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concluded that there are about 56,300 new infections each year, not the 40,000 figure that has been gospel for so long.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2008 | Vimal Patel, Times Staff Writer
President Bush signed a sweeping measure Wednesday that provides $48 billion to combat AIDS and other diseases globally and that also ends a long-standing U.S. ban on foreign visitors and immigrants who are HIV-positive. The travel ban, approved in 1993, was seen by opponents as an anachronism from a period of hysteria surrounding gays. Its repeal, however, does not remove all U.S. travel impediments.
SCIENCE
July 30, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The number of AIDS deaths worldwide dropped 10% in 2007 because of increasing access to treatment, as did the number of new infections in children, the United Nations reported Tuesday. Condom use and prevention efforts increased in many countries and adolescent sexual intercourse declined in some of the most heavily affected regions, the report says. "In a surprisingly short period of time, there has been a tripling of prevention efforts in some countries," said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2008 | Mary Engle, Times Staff Writer
The VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System began offering 20-minute HIV tests at its downtown ambulatory care center Tuesday -- part of a campaign to encourage more veterans to get tested and treated for the virus. "HIV testing is the gateway to life-saving therapy," said Dr. Earl Tso, a primary care physician who is leading the downtown center's outreach effort. In the past, veterans wanting to be tested for HIV had to have blood drawn and sent to a laboratory for analysis.
WORLD
February 15, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writers
This western Kenya village was slowly dying five years ago. One in three people was HIV-positive, then a virtual death sentence. Coffin-makers couldn't work fast enough and the nearby hospital overflowed with HIV patients. No family went untouched, but stigma was so severe that few got tested and the word AIDS was rarely uttered. Today, with an influx of U.S.-funded antiretroviral drugs, prevalence rates have dropped to single digits. The AIDS ward has shut down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1998 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prompted by reports that at least three sex film actresses have tested positive for HIV since the beginning of the year, many of the largest sex video producers have formed a pact to require the use of condoms on screen--a move the industry has avoided since the AIDS outbreak began. The decision came at a hastily called summit of industry executives earlier this month, as rumors swirled and actors and actresses threatened to walk off sets.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Brad Davis joined the cast of "The Habitation of Dragons," a drama about family and politics in a small Texas town, he had been HIV-positive for six years and had already developed some symptoms of AIDS. But nobody involved with the film knew that. So nobody knew then that the film--which airs tonight at 5, 7 and 9 as part ofcable channel TNT's "Screenworks" series--would be his last.
SCIENCE
February 9, 2008 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
The use of antiretroviral drugs by mother or baby for several months after delivery can significantly reduce the risk of transmitting the AIDS virus during breast-feeding, researchers reported this week. Public health officials have had great success blocking HIV transmission to newborns using the drugs AZT and nevirapine about the time of delivery, but they have had few tools to prevent transmission through breast-feeding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2008 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
Twelve years after a Silver Lake man died, his pharmacy receipts and medical bills sit in a Los Angeles archive with a hand-written message declaring: "The Cost of AIDS." In a San Francisco library, a massive photo collection capturing the exuberance of gay liberation in the 1970s and its tragic collision with AIDS fills many cartons.
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