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Human Intracisternal Retrovirus

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NEWS
July 24, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Experts gathered at the eighth International Conference on AIDS insisted Thursday that there is no reason for undue alarm over reports of a possible new virus that may be linked to a baffling series of AIDS-like cases, and they predicted that researchers will unravel the mystery quickly. To that end, World Health Organization officials announced that they plan to hold a meeting soon to determine the extent of the cases. U.S. experts said they will step up their investigations of the phenomenon.
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NEWS
July 25, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The eighth International Conference on AIDS ended Friday after six days in which news of scientific gains and epidemiological trends was upstaged by the startling possibility that a new and undetectable virus could be causing a baffling spate of AIDS-like diseases. Despite hundreds of papers and presentations that covered a range of scientific, medical, political and sociological aspects of the deadly disease, reports about the possible new virus seemed to dominate the conference.
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NEWS
July 24, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN and ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid the clutter of his UC Irvine immunology lab Thursday, Dr. Sudhir Gupta posed this way and that for one television news crew after another. Gupta holding a tray of vials; Gupta standing next to a sample cabinet. Dan Rather's "CBS Evening News" crew rolled in next, moving the nattily dressed immunologist to the next room, where he sat before a refrigerator to explain for the umpteenth time: No, he had not discovered a new AIDS virus.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Experts gathered at the eighth International Conference on AIDS insisted Thursday that there is no reason for undue alarm over reports of a possible new virus that may be linked to a baffling series of AIDS-like cases, and they predicted that researchers will unravel the mystery quickly. To that end, World Health Organization officials announced that they plan to hold a meeting soon to determine the extent of the cases. U.S. experts said they will step up their investigations of the phenomenon.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A team of UC Irvine scientists has isolated a previously unknown virus in nine people who had an AIDS-like disease but tested negative for the two viruses known to cause AIDS. The new virus was first discovered in a 66-year-old Southern California woman who had a type of pneumonia common to AIDS patients but other than a blood transfusion 40 years ago, had no known risk factors for AIDS, UCI researchers announced Wednesday.
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The eighth International Conference on AIDS ended Friday after six days in which news of scientific gains and epidemiological trends was upstaged by the startling possibility that a new and undetectable virus could be causing a baffling spate of AIDS-like diseases. Despite hundreds of papers and presentations that covered a range of scientific, medical, political and sociological aspects of the deadly disease, reports about the possible new virus seemed to dominate the conference.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN and ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid the clutter of his UC Irvine immunology lab Thursday, one television crew after another posed Dr. Sudhir Gupta this way and that. Gupta holding a tray of vials; Gupta standing next to a sample cabinet. Dan Rather's "CBS Evening News" crew rolled in next, moving the nattily dressed immunologist to the next room, where he sat before a refrigerator to explain for the umpteenth time that, no, he had not discovered a new AIDS virus.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN and ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid the clutter of his UC Irvine immunology lab Thursday, Dr. Sudhir Gupta posed this way and that for one television news crew after another. Gupta holding a tray of vials; Gupta standing next to a sample cabinet. Dan Rather's "CBS Evening News" crew rolled in next, moving the nattily dressed immunologist to the next room, where he sat before a refrigerator to explain for the umpteenth time: No, he had not discovered a new AIDS virus.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN and ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid the clutter of his UC Irvine immunology lab Thursday, one television crew after another posed Dr. Sudhir Gupta this way and that. Gupta holding a tray of vials; Gupta standing next to a sample cabinet. Dan Rather's "CBS Evening News" crew rolled in next, moving the nattily dressed immunologist to the next room, where he sat before a refrigerator to explain for the umpteenth time that, no, he had not discovered a new AIDS virus.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A team of UC Irvine scientists has isolated a previously unknown virus in nine people who had an AIDS-like disease but tested negative for the two viruses known to cause AIDS. The new virus was first discovered in a 66-year-old Southern California woman who had a type of pneumonia common to AIDS patients but other than a blood transfusion 40 years ago, had no known risk factors for AIDS, UCI researchers announced Wednesday.
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