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NEWS
August 7, 1994 | MIKE CORBETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steve Markhem did a double take as what looked like an egg on wheels flashed by a shopping mall in this North Coast timber town. A moment later, a contraption with two drivers seated back to back rounded a corner. Then a yellow blur shaped like the nose of an airplane whizzed by. "What in the world is that?" Markhem asked, dumbfounded by the sight. A bird? A plane? A UFO? Try human-powered vehicle.
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WORLD
March 29, 2010 | By Mark Magnier
In a gloomy building off Ganguly Street with 12-foot ceilings and floors carpeted with wood chips, Mohammad Manawwar spends his days building the obsolete. Nearly half a century ago, his father and grandfather taught him how to hand-craft a rickshaw, shaping the spokes and outer arc of the oversized wheels from pieces of ash and lining the bucket seat with a pillow of flax. "For years, they've threatened to close us down," he said. "But we're still here." Welcome to Kolkata, where poverty, inertia and entrenched interests have made this former capital of the Raj a soulful, somewhat squalid bastion of fading traditions and technologies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1989
A team of cyclists led by a Fallbrook man zipped to victory after departing Orange County last weekend in the first cross-country test for high-tech bikes known as human-powered vehicles. Led by ultra-endurance cycling champ Pete Penseyres of Fallbrook and his brother James, of San Juan Capistrano, the four-man squad took turns piloting Lightning to the finish line in New York's Battery Park, covering the 3,000-mile race course in 5 days, 1 hour and 8 minutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The flag drops today on the second-most-famous race of the Memorial Day weekend: the 35th Annual Arcata to Ferndale World Championship Kinetic Sculpture Race. Unlike the Indianapolis 500, the Kinetic Sculpture Race is slow and silent, because the entertaining homemade racers must be human-powered. The 38-mile course has the intrepid racers trudging through sand, water, road and mud.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The crowd was cheering and ringing cow bells. The teams had come from universities as far away as Hawaii, New York and Canada. The contestants raced around the track on contraptions that had a faint resemblance to bicycles. No, this wasn't some sort of funky NCAA sporting event. It was the 15th Annual Human Powered Vehicle Competition, a matchup of creativity and engineering know-how as well as physical strength.
WORLD
March 29, 2010 | By Mark Magnier
In a gloomy building off Ganguly Street with 12-foot ceilings and floors carpeted with wood chips, Mohammad Manawwar spends his days building the obsolete. Nearly half a century ago, his father and grandfather taught him how to hand-craft a rickshaw, shaping the spokes and outer arc of the oversized wheels from pieces of ash and lining the bucket seat with a pillow of flax. "For years, they've threatened to close us down," he said. "But we're still here." Welcome to Kolkata, where poverty, inertia and entrenched interests have made this former capital of the Raj a soulful, somewhat squalid bastion of fading traditions and technologies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The flag drops today on the second-most-famous race of the Memorial Day weekend: the 35th Annual Arcata to Ferndale World Championship Kinetic Sculpture Race. Unlike the Indianapolis 500, the Kinetic Sculpture Race is slow and silent, because the entertaining homemade racers must be human-powered. The 38-mile course has the intrepid racers trudging through sand, water, road and mud.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, for 12 hours on average, Ayodhya, a 35-year-old Calcutta slum dweller, turns himself into a beast of burden to feed himself, his wife and three children. Skinny and barely five feet tall, he grabs the wooden forks of his rickshaw and lugs people through the crowded streets of Calcutta for about 15 cents a mile. On a good day, the illiterate economic migrant from Bihar, India's poorest state, clears around $2.
NEWS
October 4, 1995 | BRAD BONHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You'll pardon Joe Grutzik if his bicycle appears to have the hiccups. Grutzik's invention--a half scooter, half mountain bike that lurches itself across the pavement--is what old-timers might call a high-falutin' contraption, of the what-in-tarnation class. Grutzik can hear the know-it-all codgers now: "Some fella had a mighty poor eye who built that front wheel; the axle's all haywire." Which, of course, is the whole idea.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | CONNIE KOENENN
Gentlemen, start your engines. No . . . wait . . . charge your batteries. It's the environmental '90s, and although the sports car race set for Sunday in Long Beach may be as competitive as the Indy 500, it won't be as noisy or polluting. The Electrathon Competition will feature ultra-light electric vehicles with limited battery packs speeding silently around the Queen Mary parking lot, their drivers testing who can go farthest before running out of power in a one-hour rally.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The crowd was cheering and ringing cow bells. The teams had come from universities as far away as Hawaii, New York and Canada. The contestants raced around the track on contraptions that had a faint resemblance to bicycles. No, this wasn't some sort of funky NCAA sporting event. It was the 15th Annual Human Powered Vehicle Competition, a matchup of creativity and engineering know-how as well as physical strength.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, for 12 hours on average, Ayodhya, a 35-year-old Calcutta slum dweller, turns himself into a beast of burden to feed himself, his wife and three children. Skinny and barely five feet tall, he grabs the wooden forks of his rickshaw and lugs people through the crowded streets of Calcutta for about 15 cents a mile. On a good day, the illiterate economic migrant from Bihar, India's poorest state, clears around $2.
NEWS
October 4, 1995 | BRAD BONHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You'll pardon Joe Grutzik if his bicycle appears to have the hiccups. Grutzik's invention--a half scooter, half mountain bike that lurches itself across the pavement--is what old-timers might call a high-falutin' contraption, of the what-in-tarnation class. Grutzik can hear the know-it-all codgers now: "Some fella had a mighty poor eye who built that front wheel; the axle's all haywire." Which, of course, is the whole idea.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | MIKE CORBETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steve Markhem did a double take as what looked like an egg on wheels flashed by a shopping mall in this North Coast timber town. A moment later, a contraption with two drivers seated back to back rounded a corner. Then a yellow blur shaped like the nose of an airplane whizzed by. "What in the world is that?" Markhem asked, dumbfounded by the sight. A bird? A plane? A UFO? Try human-powered vehicle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1989
A team of cyclists led by a Fallbrook man zipped to victory after departing Orange County last weekend in the first cross-country test for high-tech bikes known as human-powered vehicles. Led by ultra-endurance cycling champ Pete Penseyres of Fallbrook and his brother James, of San Juan Capistrano, the four-man squad took turns piloting Lightning to the finish line in New York's Battery Park, covering the 3,000-mile race course in 5 days, 1 hour and 8 minutes.
NEWS
April 9, 1995
Here's the word on ecological matters for families from TV's "Newton" scientist, Bill Nye the Science Guy and a mad scientist: "My biggest concern is the destruction of our natural habitat. Families need to share in their understanding of concern. Adults and young people need to work together, for example, on how to use water more wisely and protect that natural habitat, and make sure they purchase environmentally safe products."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1990
The city Transportation Commission, seeking to ensure the safety of pedestrians on Ocean Front Walk in Venice and elsewhere, endorsed a proposed ordinance Thursday designed to crack down on reckless skateboarders, roller-skaters and bicyclists. The panel also approved a second ordinance that would let the Transportation Department establish broad restrictions over such activities. Both ordinances must be approved by the City Council.
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