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OPINION
February 28, 1993 | Paul Hoffman and Gara LaMarche, Paul Hoffman is legal director of the ACLU Foundation of Southern California and a member of the executive committee of Human Rights Watch/California. Gara LaMarche is associate director of Human Rights Watch, based in New York.
Unlike many nations, the United States has a Bill of Rights and civil-rights laws, along with independent courts available to remedy abuses. What has been lacking until recently, when the United States finally ratified the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights after more than 25 years' delay, is any recognition that this country must account to the world for its human-rights practices.
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WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- The only candidate running for president against Egypt's former military chief, Abdel Fattah Sisi, has reportedly said that if elected he would put Sisi on trial in connection with the deaths of hundreds of protesters. "I don't treat Sisi as a criminal, but I plan to bring him to court …. When I do this, I aim to heal wounds without opening up new confrontations," candidate Hamdeen Sabahi was quoted as saying by the Egyptian news outlet Youm7 on Friday. Sabahi's campaign denied the comments were his. But Youm7 posted an audio recording of a voice that sounded much like the candidate.
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WORLD
March 21, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. human rights chief accused the Sudanese army of looting towns and raping girls and women during attacks carried out in West Darfur with the help of Arab militias. The Feb. 8 attacks on Sirba, Sileia and Abu Suruj, with helicopter gunships and fixed-wing craft, killed at least 115 people and caused 30,000 to flee their homes, Louise Arbour, the U.N. high commissioner for human rights, said in a report. "The scale of destruction . . . suggests that the damage was a deliberate and integral part of a military strategy," the nine-page report says.
WORLD
April 14, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
The United Nations human rights chief condemned widespread torture by all sides in the Syrian conflict, citing examples such as that of a detained 26-year-old woman who was raped, had her teeth pulled out and was beaten with electrical cables. The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights said in a report released Monday that it had interviewed individuals who spent time in detention facilities in Syria. It did not identify them by name. It said the young woman reported that she had been tortured during repeated nightlong interrogation sessions.
WORLD
May 12, 2004 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
China's state-monitored Internet has been having a field day with the scandal over the abuse of Iraqi prisoners, even as some analysts here warned that the issue could alter the Sino-U.S. human rights debate. "It could strengthen China's position, putting the political dialogue between the U.S. government and the Chinese government at least on an equal footing," said Yan Xuetong, an expert at Qinghua University here on relations between the nations.
OPINION
May 18, 2009
The Obama administration says it is committed to protecting human rights and supporting multilateral institutions, and the decision to seek a place on the United Nations Human Rights Council was a step in that direction. We are pleased that the General Assembly voted overwhelmingly last week to seat the United States on the council for the first time since its creation in 2006. The council was set up to replace the U.N. Human Rights Commission, which was ineffective.
WORLD
December 4, 2012 | By Ramin Mostaghim
TEHRAN -- Jailed Iranian human rights attorney Nasrin Sotoudeh has halted her hunger strike after the Iranian judiciary agreed to drop a travel ban against her daughter, her husband said Tuesday. Sotoudeh had endured nearly seven weeks without food, drinking salt and sugar solutions, to protest her 12-year-old daughter Mehrave being banned from leaving the country. The couple claimed their daughter was being punished for the alleged crimes of her mother, who has defended dissidents.
OPINION
March 1, 2012
If foreign victims of human rights abuses can use U.S. courts to seek justice from their tormentors, it shouldn't matter whether they were mistreated by an individual or a corporation. But the Supreme Court was urged this week by an international oil company to insulate it from a law against torture and other violations of the "law of nations. " In 1789, Congress enacted the Alien Tort Statute, which gave federal district courts jurisdiction over "any civil action by an alien for a tort committed in violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States.
WORLD
January 24, 2013 | By Reem Abdellatif
CAIRO - An Egyptian human rights groups reported this week that torture and police brutality, which helped spark a national uprising two years ago, have continued under the new Islamist-led government. Over the course of 2011 and 2012, the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR) documented more than 20 extrajudicial killings as a result of torture or "unnecessary" use of firearms by police forces, the group said in a report released ahead of the second anniversary of the Jan. 25 revolt that eventually toppled former President Hosni Mubarak.
WORLD
January 18, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim
TEHRAN -- Iranian attorney and human rights activist Nasrin Sotoudeh was  freed for three days from a Tehran prison after more than two years behind bars. "She is suffering from digestive system disorder, her mom is recently deceased, so she needs to be out of jail to spend time with her children and family and restore her health," her husband, Reza Khandan, told The Times. Sotoudeh herself did not speak with the media. Sotoudeh, who is known for defending Iranian dissidents, was convicted of undermining national security and spreading propaganda against the government after she spoke out against the unannounced execution of one of her clients.
WORLD
April 3, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - A series of mortar shells fired by rebels killed six children and injured 16 others Thursday in and around the Syrian capital of Damascus, according to Syria's official news agency. Rebels based in the capital's outskirts frequently fire mortar shells into the city, which is under tight security. The recent rise in strikes on the capital comes after a relative lull in such attacks earlier in the year. Government officials condemn the mortar fire as indiscriminate. Commanders of forces opposing President Bashar Assad say the attacks target only military, police and government installations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Michelle Obama, who has been an effective if tamped-down first lady, took her daughters and mother to China this week. The seven-day trip, which ends Wednesday, is not much different from other most traditional first lady trips, where highly choreographed appearances and interactions centering on the importance of education unfurl predictably. Obama's conversations and statements are friendly, inspirational and anodyne. The Obamas have also taken in the sights, and if you'd like to see what they have seen, you can read her official blog . Their itinerary includes the Forbidden City, the Summer Palace, the Great Wall and the Chengu Panda Base, home to dozens of the magical creatures.
WORLD
March 23, 2014 | By Glen Johnson and Nabih Bulos
GAZIANTEP, Turkey -- Turkish fighter jets shot down a Syrian warplane Sunday in an embattled border zone, and Turkey and Syria each insisted the plane was in their airspace when it was downed. The downing was the latest border clash between onetime allies who have turned on one another because of Syria's 3-year-old civil war. Turkey has sided with the opposition in that conflict, angering the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Turkey blamed Syria for what it said was an aerial encroachment Sunday, while Syrian state television said a military official called Turkey's action “blatant aggression.” A monitoring group, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, said initial reports indicated the plane came down on the Syrian side of the frontier.
WORLD
March 22, 2014 | By Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - Syrian army units ambushed and killed a group of opposition fighters near Damascus, the capital, state media reported Saturday, saying that the group had crossed into the country from neighboring Jordan. The rebels, which Syria's state-run news agency said were attached to Islamist factions including the Islamic Front and Al Qaeda -linked Al Nusra Front, were monitored as they crossed the Syria-Jordan border before being engaged by army units in the city of Adra , 11 miles northeast of Damascus.
WORLD
March 17, 2014 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO  - A state-appointed human rights panel on Monday blamed both sides for the deadly violence seven months ago when security forces broke up protest camps set up by supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi. The National Council for Human Rights, releasing its findings at a news conference, said it had confirmed the deaths of 632 people, most of them protesters. Egyptian and international human rights groups have put the toll over several days in mid-August at nearly double that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014
Chokwe Lumumba, 66, a human rights activist and nationally prominent attorney who became mayor of Jackson, Miss., last year, died Tuesday at a Jackson hospital, city officials said. The cause wasn't immediately clear. As an attorney, Lumumba represented Tupac Shakur in cases including one in which the rapper was cleared of aggravated assault in the shootings of two off-duty police officers who were visiting Atlanta from another city when they were wounded. Shakur died in 1996. Lumumba also represented Lance Parker, one of the defendants in the attack on truck driver Reginald O. Denny at the beginning of the 1992 Los Angeles riots.
WORLD
October 2, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- The Roman Catholic Church in El Salvador has abruptly closed its important human rights and legal aid office, which for years, and sometimes at great risk, denounced and investigated the most egregious atrocities surrounding that country's civil war. The surprise decision became known Tuesday, when employees showed up for work at the Tutela Legal office in the capital, San Salvador, and found padlocks on the doors and guards who...
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
A potentially tense exchange between Republican Sen. John McCain and Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping on Wednesday provided a glimpse into the personal political skills of heir apparent to China's presidency. Xi was holding a private meeting with nearly a dozen influential senators, both Republicans and Democrats, when McCain -- who described himself as "the skunk at the garden party" -- questioned the Chinese leader on the country's human rights record. "I said that we admire all their progress, we admire their economy -- unfortunately we still have Buddhist monks, Tibetans, burning themselves to death, Nobel prize winners under house arrest, and I said I do not understand why you continue to prop up North Korea, which is a threat to the security of the world, and I want to know why you vetoed the resolution on Syria at the U.N. Security Council," McCain said, recounting the closed session.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. - President Obama warned Sunday that a harsh new anti-gay law in Uganda would “complicate our valued relationship” with the east African country, which receives hundreds of millions of dollars a year in U.S. aid. In a last-ditch effort to derail the measure, national security advisor Susan Rice called Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni over the weekend and urged him not to sign the measure. The law includes a provision of life in prison for “aggravated homosexuality.” But amid news reports that Museveni was intent on pressing forward, Obama said Sunday that the move would be “a step backward for all Ugandans” and would reflect poorly on the country's commitment to protecting the human rights of its people.
WORLD
February 13, 2014 | By Raja Abdulrahim
When Omar Naasir wants a restful night's sleep in Aleppo, he says, he stays as close as possible to the front line of the ongoing clashes between Syrian rebel and government forces. Farther back in his rebel-controlled neighborhood, Naasir says, the risk of death greatly increases because of the barrel bombs and other explosives raining down daily amid the government's bombardment campaign. "Between us and the regime army is sometimes less than 100 meters, so they don't drop barrel bombs there so they don't strike their positions," he said via Skype, referring to the deadly oil drums filled with TNT. "With barrel bombs, there is a feeling of paralysis that is indescribable," said the former peace activist turned rebel.
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