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Human Rights Afghanistan

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NEWS
April 29, 1999 | HEIDI SHERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) was honored Wednesday by a prominent human rights group for her efforts to spotlight and combat the repression of women in Afghanistan. Feinstein is a leader in the effort "to assure we in the U.S. are doing all we can to bring an end to the oppression," said Len Rubenstein, director of the Boston-based Physicians for Human Rights, which sponsored Wednesday's luncheon.
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NEWS
November 25, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a doctor to impose the Taliban version of God's law. He wore a blue surgical mask under a white hospital cap, which left a narrow slit for him to see through. The convict would know him only by his eyes. Ghulam Farooq, an apprentice ironsmith accused of theft, was ordered to lie on dying brown grass near the center of the Kabul Sports Stadium in July 1998 so that a capacity crowd could watch the Taliban enforce its strain of Sharia, Islamic law.
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NEWS
October 15, 2001 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sprawling refugee camps on the Pakistani-Afghan border have long been breeding grounds for male militants in Afghanistan--first for the moujahedeen fighters who battled the Soviet occupation in the 1980s and, more recently, for the fundamentalist Taliban. But here in the dusty, abused terrain of Pakistan's northwestern frontier, the Khaiwa refugee camp is a uniquely feminist outpost. Women in the Khaiwa camp shun the head-to-toe raiment known as a burka.
NEWS
October 15, 2001 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sprawling refugee camps on the Pakistani-Afghan border have long been breeding grounds for male militants in Afghanistan--first for the moujahedeen fighters who battled the Soviet occupation in the 1980s and, more recently, for the fundamentalist Taliban. But here in the dusty, abused terrain of Pakistan's northwestern frontier, the Khaiwa refugee camp is a uniquely feminist outpost. Women in the Khaiwa camp shun the head-to-toe raiment known as a burka.
NEWS
August 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Boston-based Physicians for Human Rights is calling on firms to halt investment in Afghanistan to protest the "war on women" by the ruling Taliban army. The group's report also urges the United Nations to consider removing its aid workers, even as the Taliban is claiming new victories that could soon put the entire country under its extreme interpretation of Islamic law. The Taliban has ruled most of Afghanistan since 1996.
NEWS
May 4, 1988
Afghan and Soviet forces routinely tortured and killed civilian refugees trying to flee to Pakistan from the war in Afghanistan, a human rights group charged. London-based Amnesty International, citing what it said appeared to be "a policy of deliberate killings" of refugees, noted one instance in which 100 families were attacked twice on their 300-mile trek out of the country. It said 24 refugees, including seven children under the age of six, were killed.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
A human rights group on Monday called for an inquiry into reports that as many as 300 Shiite Muslim civilians were recently massacred by Afghanistan's ruling Taliban in the central province of Bamian. Citing witnesses, New York-based Human Rights Watch said Taliban troops rounded up and shot about 300 men after capturing the city of Yakaolang in January. The Taliban rejected the report. The United Nations said Jan.
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | From Reuters
The U.N. Human Rights Commission ended a politically acrimonious annual meeting Friday, adopting a final report that included strong criticism of Afghanistan, Chile and Iran. The 43-nation commission approved 61 resolutions, including decisions to renew the mandates of special investigators to look into alleged murder and torture by the governments of those three countries. Delegates also extended the mandate of a special rapporteur, or investigator, on El Salvador.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton told a U.N. conference on equality Thursday that women stand on the front lines of the battle for human rights and that their voices must be heard. The day after former White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky painted a highly intimate portrait of her relationship with President Clinton for more than 48 million television viewers, the first lady received a standing ovation when she entered the large conference room at U.N. headquarters.
NEWS
November 25, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a doctor to impose the Taliban version of God's law. He wore a blue surgical mask under a white hospital cap, which left a narrow slit for him to see through. The convict would know him only by his eyes. Ghulam Farooq, an apprentice ironsmith accused of theft, was ordered to lie on dying brown grass near the center of the Kabul Sports Stadium in July 1998 so that a capacity crowd could watch the Taliban enforce its strain of Sharia, Islamic law.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
A human rights group on Monday called for an inquiry into reports that as many as 300 Shiite Muslim civilians were recently massacred by Afghanistan's ruling Taliban in the central province of Bamian. Citing witnesses, New York-based Human Rights Watch said Taliban troops rounded up and shot about 300 men after capturing the city of Yakaolang in January. The Taliban rejected the report. The United Nations said Jan.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | HEIDI SHERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) was honored Wednesday by a prominent human rights group for her efforts to spotlight and combat the repression of women in Afghanistan. Feinstein is a leader in the effort "to assure we in the U.S. are doing all we can to bring an end to the oppression," said Len Rubenstein, director of the Boston-based Physicians for Human Rights, which sponsored Wednesday's luncheon.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton told a U.N. conference on equality Thursday that women stand on the front lines of the battle for human rights and that their voices must be heard. The day after former White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky painted a highly intimate portrait of her relationship with President Clinton for more than 48 million television viewers, the first lady received a standing ovation when she entered the large conference room at U.N. headquarters.
NEWS
August 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Boston-based Physicians for Human Rights is calling on firms to halt investment in Afghanistan to protest the "war on women" by the ruling Taliban army. The group's report also urges the United Nations to consider removing its aid workers, even as the Taliban is claiming new victories that could soon put the entire country under its extreme interpretation of Islamic law. The Taliban has ruled most of Afghanistan since 1996.
NEWS
May 4, 1988
Afghan and Soviet forces routinely tortured and killed civilian refugees trying to flee to Pakistan from the war in Afghanistan, a human rights group charged. London-based Amnesty International, citing what it said appeared to be "a policy of deliberate killings" of refugees, noted one instance in which 100 families were attacked twice on their 300-mile trek out of the country. It said 24 refugees, including seven children under the age of six, were killed.
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | From Reuters
The U.N. Human Rights Commission ended a politically acrimonious annual meeting Friday, adopting a final report that included strong criticism of Afghanistan, Chile and Iran. The 43-nation commission approved 61 resolutions, including decisions to renew the mandates of special investigators to look into alleged murder and torture by the governments of those three countries. Delegates also extended the mandate of a special rapporteur, or investigator, on El Salvador.
WORLD
April 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Under U.S. pressure, the United Nations has eliminated the job of its top investigator on human rights in Afghanistan. U.S. diplomats pressed the U.N. Commission on Human Rights to end the mandate of Cherif Bassiouni, a Chicago-based law professor who has repeatedly criticized the U.S. military for detaining prisoners without trial and for barring almost all human rights monitors from its prisons in the country. An American official who asked not to be named said the U.S.
WORLD
August 22, 2004 | From Reuters
A U.N. human rights expert criticized U.S. military authorities in Afghanistan on Saturday for barring him from visiting detention centers, and he described one Kabul prison he did visit as "inhuman." The lack of transparency "raises serious concerns about the legality of detention and conditions of those detainees," M. Cherif Bassiouni said. Former prisoners have said they were tortured and abused while in U.S. custody in Afghanistan, raising concerns that the mistreatment of U.S.
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