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Human Rights Africa

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NEWS
October 12, 1987 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
The Commonwealth heads of government, gathering for what has become a biennial attack on South Africa's apartheid system, came under attack Sunday for "deplorable" and widespread violations of human rights. Amnesty International, a private agency that monitors human rights practices around the world, charged that two-thirds of the Commonwealth, made up of Britain and its former colonies and dominions, systematically engage in abuses ranging from torture to illegal detention.
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NEWS
December 16, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winding up a week's tour of Africa, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Monday that Washington's traditional foreign policy emphasis on human rights must be adjusted to take into account the "local context" of the continent's diverse countries. This was a rare admission by a top U.S. official that the American model of multi-party democracy, freedom of association and respect for opposition opinion may not be exportable to the Third World.
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NEWS
January 14, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stern speech to the international community, Pope John Paul II on Saturday called for a global ban "without delay" on the proliferation and testing of all nuclear weapons. In a French-language "state of the world" speech to diplomats from 161 countries, the pope also appealed for resolution of the status of Jerusalem, asked Muslim states to allow greater religious freedom and warned a number of African leaders to clean up their acts.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stern speech to the international community, Pope John Paul II on Saturday called for a global ban "without delay" on the proliferation and testing of all nuclear weapons. In a French-language "state of the world" speech to diplomats from 161 countries, the pope also appealed for resolution of the status of Jerusalem, asked Muslim states to allow greater religious freedom and warned a number of African leaders to clean up their acts.
NEWS
December 16, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winding up a week's tour of Africa, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Monday that Washington's traditional foreign policy emphasis on human rights must be adjusted to take into account the "local context" of the continent's diverse countries. This was a rare admission by a top U.S. official that the American model of multi-party democracy, freedom of association and respect for opposition opinion may not be exportable to the Third World.
NEWS
May 22, 1989
Amnesty International said human rights violations are taking place in a majority of the world's 40 French-speaking nations. The London-based rights group said in Paris that violations including torture and executions have been registered. Amnesty International said it has established that torture was widely used by security services during riots in Algeria, and it added that many African countries have used torture against political opponents. It made the disclosure in a report released in advance of the annual summit of Francophone countries that opens Wednesday in Dakar, the capital of Senegal.
NEWS
February 1, 1992 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The collapse of totalitarian Communist regimes contributed to a general improvement in human rights conditions worldwide last year, the State Department reported Friday. "In many countries there is now less fear of the knock on the door at midnight than there was as recently as five years ago," Richard Schifter, assistant secretary for human rights, said in releasing the agency's annual report on the state of human rights worldwide.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just four years ago, President Francois Mitterrand lost patience with human rights abuses in Zaire, Gabon and Togo and vowed to work for the ouster of those countries' dictators. This week, though, in the French resort of Biarritz, those same dictators again were enjoying head-of-state perks at the Franco-African summit--still in power and still supping with Mitterrand and top French officials.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assistant Secretary of State John H. Shattuck, finding signals of improved stability in ravaged Rwanda, hailed the new Rwandan leaders Tuesday for promising to turn over suspected killers to a future U.N. war crimes tribunal.
OPINION
February 4, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
A disturbing new law in Nigeria establishes sweeping restrictions on homosexuality and has already led to dozens of arrests. Even before the law went into effect, it was illegal to engage in same-sex relations. But the new law goes further, prohibiting civil unions and same-sex marriages and threatening to slap a 10-year prison sentence on anyone who officiates at such a marriage. The law bans public displays of affection between people of the same sex, outlaws gay support organizations and makes it illegal for gay groups to meet.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just four years ago, President Francois Mitterrand lost patience with human rights abuses in Zaire, Gabon and Togo and vowed to work for the ouster of those countries' dictators. This week, though, in the French resort of Biarritz, those same dictators again were enjoying head-of-state perks at the Franco-African summit--still in power and still supping with Mitterrand and top French officials.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assistant Secretary of State John H. Shattuck, finding signals of improved stability in ravaged Rwanda, hailed the new Rwandan leaders Tuesday for promising to turn over suspected killers to a future U.N. war crimes tribunal.
NEWS
February 1, 1992 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The collapse of totalitarian Communist regimes contributed to a general improvement in human rights conditions worldwide last year, the State Department reported Friday. "In many countries there is now less fear of the knock on the door at midnight than there was as recently as five years ago," Richard Schifter, assistant secretary for human rights, said in releasing the agency's annual report on the state of human rights worldwide.
NEWS
May 22, 1989
Amnesty International said human rights violations are taking place in a majority of the world's 40 French-speaking nations. The London-based rights group said in Paris that violations including torture and executions have been registered. Amnesty International said it has established that torture was widely used by security services during riots in Algeria, and it added that many African countries have used torture against political opponents. It made the disclosure in a report released in advance of the annual summit of Francophone countries that opens Wednesday in Dakar, the capital of Senegal.
NEWS
October 12, 1987 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
The Commonwealth heads of government, gathering for what has become a biennial attack on South Africa's apartheid system, came under attack Sunday for "deplorable" and widespread violations of human rights. Amnesty International, a private agency that monitors human rights practices around the world, charged that two-thirds of the Commonwealth, made up of Britain and its former colonies and dominions, systematically engage in abuses ranging from torture to illegal detention.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | Times Wire Services
Five Somalis were killed Friday in the southern Somali port of Kismayu, four of them in gun battles with Belgian troops, the U.S. military said. The fifth Somali died in renewed clan clashes in the port, the spokesman, Marine Col. Fred Peck, told reporters. He also announced that Kismayu's rival warlords, Mohamed Siad Hirsi, known as Gen. Morgan, and Omar Jess, volunteered to hand over more weapons to the U.S.-led task force today.
NEWS
November 1, 1995 | From Associated Press
A playwright who fought for the rights of a minority ethnic group was convicted of four counts of murder Tuesday and immediately sentenced to death. Ken Saro-Wiwa, 54, a member of Nigeria's minority Ogoni tribe, was found guilty in the deaths of four electoral opponents who died during a melee at a political rally last year. Saro-Wiwa was to have addressed the crowd. "Although Mr.
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