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Human Rights Albania

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NEWS
April 14, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the infamous "Case of the Engineers," the crime of Enrik Veizi and three other oil exploration experts was having the cheek to tell the government that it was drilling for oil in an area where it was known there was none. For challenging the leadership's wisdom, they were tortured into confessing to sabotage and spying. A court condemned them to 25 years in prison, extolling the leniency that let them escape with their lives.
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NEWS
February 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Police beat would-be demonstrators with clubs and detained 15 opposition leaders in the capital, Tirana, in an effort to quell even the smallest anti-government protests by victims of shady get-rich-quick schemes. The harsh police response reflected the government's determination to prevent a repeat of the huge demonstrations several weeks ago after the government shut down the schemes.
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NEWS
July 3, 1990 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was nearly midnight, and rain fell as an Albanian stood under an umbrella and talked to a stranger, an American, about forbidden things. All at once, he stopped. "Policia!" he whispered. Then he turned and walked off. Two policemen strode past and caught up with him, escorting him into the shadows of an alley. A few days later, by chance, he saw the American again. The police had held him for more than an hour, he said.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
This nation's last Communist ruler, Ramiz Alia, was convicted Saturday and sentenced to nine years in prison for violating the rights of citizens while he was in power. A three-judge panel reached the verdict partly on the testimony of former political prisoners. Alia, 68, said the verdict against him "shows that revenge is still very strong." The former president said the charges against him were political.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | From Reuters
Albania, Europe's last hard-line Communist state, has announced sweeping reforms of human rights, giving individuals more legal powers and changing the definition of crimes against the state. The reforms mark an apparent softening of the Communist Party's orthodox line, which had resisted the wave of change that swept one-party power from neighboring East European states.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
This nation's last Communist ruler, Ramiz Alia, was convicted Saturday and sentenced to nine years in prison for violating the rights of citizens while he was in power. A three-judge panel reached the verdict partly on the testimony of former political prisoners. Alia, 68, said the verdict against him "shows that revenge is still very strong." The former president said the charges against him were political.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | United Press International
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar, in a historic visit to Albania, welcomed the Balkan country's emergence from decades of isolation and urged its leaders to pay more attention to human rights, the official ATA news agency said Saturday. In his second day in Tirana, the U.N. chief placed a wreath at a monument honoring Albania's dead from World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1990 | ALLISON SAMUELS
Nick H. Christ still has vivid memories of the faces of despair he saw through the electrified barbed-wire fence that separates southern Epirus in Greece from northern Epirus in Albania. "It was truly a pathetic sight," said the 62-year-old Greek immigrant who lives in Tustin. "Seeing those people enslaved sent chills up my spine. Something has to be done to stop the human suffering that is happening there."
NEWS
March 11, 1991 | Associated Press
At least 1,500 Albanians sailed for home after frustrating days without food or shelter in Italy. About 18,000 Albanian refugees remained, hoping to avoid being deported. Police in this port city broke up several scuffles among men crowded on the docks, where many refugees slept in the rain over the weekend. A man who described himself as a leader of those returning said: "We did not find freedom and a friendly welcome, but the police on our arrival. We have been left without food for days."
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Police beat would-be demonstrators with clubs and detained 15 opposition leaders in the capital, Tirana, in an effort to quell even the smallest anti-government protests by victims of shady get-rich-quick schemes. The harsh police response reflected the government's determination to prevent a repeat of the huge demonstrations several weeks ago after the government shut down the schemes.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the infamous "Case of the Engineers," the crime of Enrik Veizi and three other oil exploration experts was having the cheek to tell the government that it was drilling for oil in an area where it was known there was none. For challenging the leadership's wisdom, they were tortured into confessing to sabotage and spying. A court condemned them to 25 years in prison, extolling the leniency that let them escape with their lives.
NEWS
March 11, 1991 | Associated Press
At least 1,500 Albanians sailed for home after frustrating days without food or shelter in Italy. About 18,000 Albanian refugees remained, hoping to avoid being deported. Police in this port city broke up several scuffles among men crowded on the docks, where many refugees slept in the rain over the weekend. A man who described himself as a leader of those returning said: "We did not find freedom and a friendly welcome, but the police on our arrival. We have been left without food for days."
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Albanian President Ramiz Alia says his hard-line Communist country should rethink enshrining the Communist Party's leading role and policy of atheism in the constitution, the state news agency reported Thursday. Signaling a further shift away from the country's orthodox Communist past, Alia said the ruling Party of Labor of Albania "should not and cannot exert state power directly" but should respect the rule of law, according to remarks published by the official news agency ATA.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was nearly midnight, and rain fell as an Albanian stood under an umbrella and talked to a stranger, an American, about forbidden things. All at once, he stopped. "Policia!" he whispered. Then he turned and walked off. Two policemen strode past and caught up with him, escorting him into the shadows of an alley. A few days later, by chance, he saw the American again. The police had held him for more than an hour, he said.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | United Press International
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar, in a historic visit to Albania, welcomed the Balkan country's emergence from decades of isolation and urged its leaders to pay more attention to human rights, the official ATA news agency said Saturday. In his second day in Tirana, the U.N. chief placed a wreath at a monument honoring Albania's dead from World War II.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | From Reuters
Albania, Europe's last hard-line Communist state, has announced sweeping reforms of human rights, giving individuals more legal powers and changing the definition of crimes against the state. The reforms mark an apparent softening of the Communist Party's orthodox line, which had resisted the wave of change that swept one-party power from neighboring East European states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1990
More than 100 Albanians waved placards and chanted slogans outside the Federal Building in Westwood on Thursday, urging the Bush Administration to focus attention on the "brutal and destructive oppression by the Stalinist regime of Ramiz Alia in Albania." The tiny Balkan nation, under Communist rule since 1944, has so far remained untouched by the democratic wave that has swept through the rest of eastern Europe.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Albanian President Ramiz Alia says his hard-line Communist country should rethink enshrining the Communist Party's leading role and policy of atheism in the constitution, the state news agency reported Thursday. Signaling a further shift away from the country's orthodox Communist past, Alia said the ruling Party of Labor of Albania "should not and cannot exert state power directly" but should respect the rule of law, according to remarks published by the official news agency ATA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1990 | ALLISON SAMUELS
Nick H. Christ still has vivid memories of the faces of despair he saw through the electrified barbed-wire fence that separates southern Epirus in Greece from northern Epirus in Albania. "It was truly a pathetic sight," said the 62-year-old Greek immigrant who lives in Tustin. "Seeing those people enslaved sent chills up my spine. Something has to be done to stop the human suffering that is happening there."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1990
More than 100 Albanians waved placards and chanted slogans outside the Federal Building in Westwood on Thursday, urging the Bush Administration to focus attention on the "brutal and destructive oppression by the Stalinist regime of Ramiz Alia in Albania." The tiny Balkan nation, under Communist rule since 1944, has so far remained untouched by the democratic wave that has swept through the rest of eastern Europe.
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