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Human Rights Armenia

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Armenia, she said, she was raped, brutalized and incarcerated for practicing transcendental meditation. She said she was forced out of her country and branded a heretic. In America, as a refugee hoping for religious asylum, Armine is dismissed as a liar. The atrocities described by Armine--who said she fears retaliation if her last name is used--ring untrue to some of her fellow expatriates residing in the large Armenian pockets of Los Angeles County. It didn't happen, they say.
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NEWS
March 21, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fighting is over, and the women of the carpet factory have returned to their looms. Hunched over the bright threads with combs, scissors and shuttles, they are once again weaving the traditional rugs of the Caucasus Mountains. Still, half the looms in the cold hall stand idle, and many of the low stools drawn up to them are empty. Ethnic Armenians are still here, grieving for the thousands killed in a decade of ethnic conflict.
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NEWS
March 21, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fighting is over, and the women of the carpet factory have returned to their looms. Hunched over the bright threads with combs, scissors and shuttles, they are once again weaving the traditional rugs of the Caucasus Mountains. Still, half the looms in the cold hall stand idle, and many of the low stools drawn up to them are empty. Ethnic Armenians are still here, grieving for the thousands killed in a decade of ethnic conflict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Armenia, she said, she was raped, brutalized and incarcerated for practicing transcendental meditation. She said she was forced out of her country and branded a heretic. In America, as a refugee hoping for religious asylum, Armine is dismissed as a liar. The atrocities described by Armine--who said she fears retaliation if her last name is used--ring untrue to some of her fellow expatriates residing in the large Armenian pockets of Los Angeles County. It didn't happen, they say.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States was voted off the U.N. Human Rights Commission on Thursday, marking the first time since the world body's inception more than five decades ago that the Americans will not hold a seat. "It was an election, understandably, where we're very disappointed," said acting U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham. "This won't at all, of course, affect our commitment to human rights issues in and outside of the United Nations. We'll continue to pursue them." In a surprise result, the U.S.
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