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NEWS
February 6, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Philippines on Friday carried out its first execution in 23 years, killing by lethal injection a house painter convicted of raping his 10-year-old stepdaughter. President Joseph Estrada, a former movie actor whose roles cast him as a tough guy with a soft heart, had said weeks ago that he would not grant clemency to Leo Echegaray, 38. On Thursday, he cut the hotline from his office to Manila's Bilibid Prison, saying: "They don't have to wait for any call from me."
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NEWS
February 6, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Philippines on Friday carried out its first execution in 23 years, killing by lethal injection a house painter convicted of raping his 10-year-old stepdaughter. President Joseph Estrada, a former movie actor whose roles cast him as a tough guy with a soft heart, had said weeks ago that he would not grant clemency to Leo Echegaray, 38. On Thursday, he cut the hotline from his office to Manila's Bilibid Prison, saying: "They don't have to wait for any call from me."
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NEWS
May 19, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seldom has the Asia-Pacific region appeared as pacific as now. In a single year, the Soviet threat has disappeared. Hopes for peace in Indochina have emerged. Ever-hostile North and South Korea are talking reconciliation. And America is preparing to make up with Vietnam. Spots of tension remain. But in a sweep down the coast of the Asian continent and around Southeast Asia, nowhere can a powder keg be found before arriving at India and Pakistan and their potential for nuclear war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1996 | DONALD K. EMMERSON, Donald K. Emmerson, a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has written widely on democracy and human rights in Asia
During Bill Clinton's travels to Japan and South Korea, he reaffirmed American support for these Asian outposts of democracy. The idea that the Japanese and South Koreans are freedom-loving democrats "like us" reinforce a characteristically American faith in the universality of individual rights as we understand them. But the leaders of some of the Asian countries that Clinton did not visit--Singapore and Malaysia, for instance--do not share this faith.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Pope John Paul II on Friday departed on a politically sensitive, 10-day Asian pilgrimage amid calls that he speak out on human rights. The Pope's special Alitalia Boeing 747 took off from Leonardo da Vinci Airport at 2:15 p.m. He was to arrive in Seoul, South Korea, today after a flight of more than 13 hours. His route will take him over the Soviet Union; China earlier denied permission for the overflight. It is the 44th foreign trip of John Paul's 11-year papacy.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The International Labor Organization, a U.N. agency, chastised the African nations of Mauritania and Sudan on Monday for continuing to practice the centuries-old scourge of slavery and accused nine other countries in Asia and Latin America of tolerating something that could be even worse--other forms of forced labor. In its annual report, the ILO acknowledged that Mauritania is trying, though somewhat feebly, to deal with the traditional problem. But the U.N.
NEWS
March 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
Europe and Asia, trying to modernize ties that have slipped behind the times, on Friday explored ways of increasing economic links but found it impossible to avoid the thorny issue of human rights. The first Asia-Europe economic summit--a two-day meeting between leaders of the 15 European Union nations and 10 of East Asia's most robust economies--seeks to renew Europe's interest in the world's fastest-growing market. Trade is booming, but European investment here is lagging.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights intruded into the summit of Asian leaders Monday with scores of demonstrators arrested in the disputed territory of East Timor and President Clinton interceding for students holding a protest in the U.S. Embassy compound here. About 600 people were reported to have rioted Monday at the university in East Timor, throwing stones at police after a scuffle between a student and a street vendor. The violence marked the third day of unrest in East Timor, 1,200 miles east of Jakarta.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of mainly Asian nations has launched a powerful assault against the long-agreed principle that basic human rights apply to individuals everywhere. The campaign, unfolding here these days at the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights, is cloaked in an old argument: that Western definitions of human rights are culture-bound and thus inappropriate in many non-Western cultures.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
The governments of North America and Western Europe, including the United States, "have become increasingly restrictive in granting asylum" to political refugees, Amnesty International said Tuesday. Where the problem is "most critical," the London-based human rights organization's refugee coordinator, Nicholas J. Rizza, said in a news conference in Los Angeles, is in the efforts of political refugees from El Salvador and Guatemala to seek asylum in the United States.
NEWS
March 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
Europe and Asia, trying to modernize ties that have slipped behind the times, on Friday explored ways of increasing economic links but found it impossible to avoid the thorny issue of human rights. The first Asia-Europe economic summit--a two-day meeting between leaders of the 15 European Union nations and 10 of East Asia's most robust economies--seeks to renew Europe's interest in the world's fastest-growing market. Trade is booming, but European investment here is lagging.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights intruded into the summit of Asian leaders Monday with scores of demonstrators arrested in the disputed territory of East Timor and President Clinton interceding for students holding a protest in the U.S. Embassy compound here. About 600 people were reported to have rioted Monday at the university in East Timor, throwing stones at police after a scuffle between a student and a street vendor. The violence marked the third day of unrest in East Timor, 1,200 miles east of Jakarta.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of mainly Asian nations has launched a powerful assault against the long-agreed principle that basic human rights apply to individuals everywhere. The campaign, unfolding here these days at the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights, is cloaked in an old argument: that Western definitions of human rights are culture-bound and thus inappropriate in many non-Western cultures.
NEWS
May 29, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday ended three years of battles between the White House and Capitol Hill over China's trade benefits, winning the backing of Democratic leaders for an executive order demanding that the Beijing regime improve its human rights policies during the next 12 months. The order, signed by Clinton early Friday, extends China's most-favored-nation trade privileges in this country for another year, until mid-1994.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The International Labor Organization, a U.N. agency, chastised the African nations of Mauritania and Sudan on Monday for continuing to practice the centuries-old scourge of slavery and accused nine other countries in Asia and Latin America of tolerating something that could be even worse--other forms of forced labor. In its annual report, the ILO acknowledged that Mauritania is trying, though somewhat feebly, to deal with the traditional problem. But the U.N.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seldom has the Asia-Pacific region appeared as pacific as now. In a single year, the Soviet threat has disappeared. Hopes for peace in Indochina have emerged. Ever-hostile North and South Korea are talking reconciliation. And America is preparing to make up with Vietnam. Spots of tension remain. But in a sweep down the coast of the Asian continent and around Southeast Asia, nowhere can a powder keg be found before arriving at India and Pakistan and their potential for nuclear war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1996 | DONALD K. EMMERSON, Donald K. Emmerson, a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has written widely on democracy and human rights in Asia
During Bill Clinton's travels to Japan and South Korea, he reaffirmed American support for these Asian outposts of democracy. The idea that the Japanese and South Koreans are freedom-loving democrats "like us" reinforce a characteristically American faith in the universality of individual rights as we understand them. But the leaders of some of the Asian countries that Clinton did not visit--Singapore and Malaysia, for instance--do not share this faith.
NEWS
May 29, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday ended three years of battles between the White House and Capitol Hill over China's trade benefits, winning the backing of Democratic leaders for an executive order demanding that the Beijing regime improve its human rights policies during the next 12 months. The order, signed by Clinton early Friday, extends China's most-favored-nation trade privileges in this country for another year, until mid-1994.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Pope John Paul II on Friday departed on a politically sensitive, 10-day Asian pilgrimage amid calls that he speak out on human rights. The Pope's special Alitalia Boeing 747 took off from Leonardo da Vinci Airport at 2:15 p.m. He was to arrive in Seoul, South Korea, today after a flight of more than 13 hours. His route will take him over the Soviet Union; China earlier denied permission for the overflight. It is the 44th foreign trip of John Paul's 11-year papacy.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
The governments of North America and Western Europe, including the United States, "have become increasingly restrictive in granting asylum" to political refugees, Amnesty International said Tuesday. Where the problem is "most critical," the London-based human rights organization's refugee coordinator, Nicholas J. Rizza, said in a news conference in Los Angeles, is in the efforts of political refugees from El Salvador and Guatemala to seek asylum in the United States.
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