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Human Rights Azerbaijan

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NEWS
July 18, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet troops have forcibly deported about 10,000 Armenian civilians in the last three months from the neighboring republic of Azerbaijan, and Armenian detainees have been repeatedly tortured in Azerbaijani prisons, international human rights activists said Wednesday.
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NEWS
February 13, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III preached democracy and human rights to Turkmenistan's president in a colorful native yurt near the Iranian border on Wednesday after obtaining pledges of human rights reform from Azerbaijan, another of the newborn states of the former Soviet Union.
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NEWS
February 13, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III preached democracy and human rights to Turkmenistan's president in a colorful native yurt near the Iranian border on Wednesday after obtaining pledges of human rights reform from Azerbaijan, another of the newborn states of the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet troops have forcibly deported about 10,000 Armenian civilians in the last three months from the neighboring republic of Azerbaijan, and Armenian detainees have been repeatedly tortured in Azerbaijani prisons, international human rights activists said Wednesday.
WORLD
November 23, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- That big, hulking statue of the Caucasian strongman has got to go. Such was the recommendation Friday of a special committee appointed to resolve one of the odder controversies to beset this capital. At issue: the city government's decision to allow Azerbaijan to erect a monument to its late president, Heydar Aliyev, on the iconic Reforma Boulevard, prime real estate in the sprawling megalopolis. The bronze and marble statue generated protests and a running debate in the media.
OPINION
September 8, 1991 | WALTER LAQUEUR, Walter Laqueur is chairman of the International Research Council of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington
During World War I, a German professor wrote an influential book in which he suggested that the Russian empire should, like an orange, be sliced into its component parts. It wasn't a brilliant idea then; it isn't one now. The current rush for full sovereignty at any price is self-defeating; those involved may live to regret it. The Soviet Union was populated by several dozen major and several hundred minor nationalities.
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