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Human Rights Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
April 16, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher has reignited the international debate about how best to bring peace to the Balkans with her withering attack on Western nations for failing to support Bosnia-Herzegovina's Muslims. Baroness Thatcher this week accused Prime Minister John Major and his government of lacking resolve, as she widened her campaign urging support for Bosnia's Muslims in their struggle against the attacking Serbs.
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NEWS
July 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
War crimes investigators have completed exhumations of mass graves in northwestern Bosnia and expect to issue new indictments this year in connection with a 1995 massacre in the Muslim enclave of Srebrenica, prosecutors said Wednesday.
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NEWS
July 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
War crimes investigators have completed exhumations of mass graves in northwestern Bosnia and expect to issue new indictments this year in connection with a 1995 massacre in the Muslim enclave of Srebrenica, prosecutors said Wednesday.
NEWS
October 6, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Esad Muhibic, the jabs thrown his way were especially hurtful. Seated before a session of parliament in Bosnia, the Muslim judge and veteran Sarajevo attorney was branded a traitor, an opportunist who had failed to protect his "own people." And it was Muhibic's "own people" doing the attacking: legislators from the ruling Muslim political party, using a very public forum to rake Muhibic over the coals.
NEWS
August 24, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a year of ethnic bloodshed and atrocities that have evoked images of Lebanon, Northern Ireland, Cyprus and the Nazi Holocaust, a gathering in London this week to draft a Western response to the horrors in Yugoslavia has invited another disturbing comparison: Munich.
NEWS
June 14, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As delegates gathered here Sunday on the eve of the first global human rights meeting in a quarter-century, their lofty goal of making the world a less oppressive place appeared about to drown in a sea of chaotic organization and diplomatic stumbling blocks.
NEWS
January 20, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite atrocities "bordering on genocide" in Bosnia-Herzegovina and bloody ethnic conflicts raging from Africa to the former Soviet republics, the State Department reported Tuesday that the worldwide human rights situation improved somewhat last year. "The human rights observance trend line was, on balance, positive," Patricia Diaz Dennis, assistant secretary of state for human rights, told reporters after issuing the 1,950-page report covering 189 countries.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A Serbian mob burned homes belonging to Muslim refugees trying to resettle their village in Serb-controlled territory, prompting heavy criticism of the NATO-led peace force. A mob of 150 Serbs entered Gajevi, a village patrolled by Russian peacekeeping troops, and set 11 prefabricated houses afire Sunday afternoon, the Stabilization Force reported.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Ambassador Madeleine Albright showed the U.N. Security Council photographs Thursday that she said depicted mass graves in Bosnia-Herzegovina that hold the bodies of as many as 2,700 civilians murdered by Bosnian Serb forces after two U.N.-protected "safe areas" were overrun last month. She said the photos, combined with witness accounts, provide a "compelling case that there were wide-scale atrocities committed . . . against defenseless civilians." A senior U.S.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the spotlight is on the deployment of troops to Bosnia, President Clinton and other policymakers are now also calling attention to the host of unheralded civilian programs that may be as crucial as the military operation in determining whether long-term peace takes hold.
NEWS
October 5, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sadik Pazarac, a Bosnian Muslim known by a decidedly Serbian nickname, Sasa, filed a final newspaper dispatch in March 1992. War was descending on his hometown. Serbian paramilitaries scoured the neighborhoods. Muslims were being rounded up and shot. Instead of covering the mayhem, the part-time reporter and veteran schoolteacher put all his energies into just surviving. "I no longer dared to go out in the street, much less to write openly and publicly," Pazarac said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998
About 60,000 Dutch Christians have signed a petition calling on the Muslim, Croatian and Serbian leaders of Bosnia for a clarification on the status of the nearly 20,000 people still unaccounted for after the end of the war in Bosnia.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ibrahim Djedovic reported for work as a newly elected legislator last spring and quickly found himself whisked away by police. Frantic efforts by international diplomats to save him failed, and Djedovic was summarily stripped of his parliamentary immunity and imprisoned on war crimes charges. Today his case has become a symbol of unhealed wounds from Europe's deadliest conflict since World War II and a stark illustration of this damaged society's inability to mete out justice.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sarajevo police whom Secretary of State Madeleine Albright praised last weekend as "heroes" have been accused of abuse in numerous recent cases, international monitors say. Human rights officials have received about 45 complaints of jailhouse beatings by Sarajevo police in the last two months. Although apparently not directed against ethnic or religious minorities, the alleged beatings of detainees indicate a disturbing abuse of police power.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A Serbian mob burned homes belonging to Muslim refugees trying to resettle their village in Serb-controlled territory, prompting heavy criticism of the NATO-led peace force. A mob of 150 Serbs entered Gajevi, a village patrolled by Russian peacekeeping troops, and set 11 prefabricated houses afire Sunday afternoon, the Stabilization Force reported.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beaten and tortured into signing murder confessions, seven Muslim men who were turned over to Bosnian Serb police by U.S. troops are at the center of a heated controversy over law, human rights and the actions of American peacekeepers. Most of the men are thought to be survivors of the Serb-captured former eastern "safe area" of Srebrenica.
NEWS
October 6, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Esad Muhibic, the jabs thrown his way were especially hurtful. Seated before a session of parliament in Bosnia, the Muslim judge and veteran Sarajevo attorney was branded a traitor, an opportunist who had failed to protect his "own people." And it was Muhibic's "own people" doing the attacking: legislators from the ruling Muslim political party, using a very public forum to rake Muhibic over the coals.
NEWS
August 8, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Mortar rounds that slammed into the headquarters of U.N. peacekeepers in Sarajevo and seriously wounded a French soldier were deliberately aimed at the United Nations, officials said Friday. The attack, which occurred late Thursday, "was a direct attack on the United Nations," U.N. spokesman Mik Magnusson said. "It was unquestionably intentional."
NEWS
February 3, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a clear violation of the U.S.-brokered peace agreement, the Muslim-led Bosnian government has been hiding 88 Serbian prisoners from international authorities and refusing to release them, the International Committee of the Red Cross reported Friday. News of the noncompliance came as Secretary of State Warren Christopher traveled to Bosnia-Herzegovina to urge the former warring factions here to abide by the accord forged in Dayton, Ohio, late last year.
NEWS
January 13, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nezad Avdic crept away from the stony killing field in this Serb-held village last summer with bullet wounds in his arm and stomach, and his heart in his throat. The baby-faced high school student was left for dead in a heap of slaughtered Muslims who fled Srebrenica when the U.N.-protected town was overrun by Bosnian Serb soldiers in July. "I was lying there when I felt a boot stop next to my head," Avdic, 17, said in an interview. "The guy next to me was groaning in pain.
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