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Human Rights Bulgaria

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NEWS
January 15, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fear of Dimo Bodurov is the problem of Bulgaria and Eastern Europe itself as the region attempts to revive democracy. A petty entrepreneur in this small factory town, Bodurov in many ways is a man to be admired. He runs the local market and is an active member of the Ekoglasnost opposition group, one of many budding organizations that will challenge the ruling Communist Party as early as next May in Bulgaria's first free elections since 1946.
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NEWS
March 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities arrested a retired deputy interior minister who ran a camp in northern Bulgaria in which hundreds of prisoners may have been killed during Todor Zhivkov's Communist regime. The arrest of 80-year-old Gen. Mincho Spassov followed a series of reports about the camp that have stirred memories of Stalinist repression.
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NEWS
August 30, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration recalled its ambassador to Bulgaria, Sol Polansky, on Tuesday to protest the Sofia regime's continuing oppression of the country's ethnic Turkish minority, which has caused about 310,000 people to flee to Turkey in the past three months. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said Polansky was ordered to return to Washington "for consultations." On the traditional list of diplomatic gestures, the action is less severe than a formal breach in relations.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fear of Dimo Bodurov is the problem of Bulgaria and Eastern Europe itself as the region attempts to revive democracy. A petty entrepreneur in this small factory town, Bodurov in many ways is a man to be admired. He runs the local market and is an active member of the Ekoglasnost opposition group, one of many budding organizations that will challenge the ruling Communist Party as early as next May in Bulgaria's first free elections since 1946.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities arrested a retired deputy interior minister who ran a camp in northern Bulgaria in which hundreds of prisoners may have been killed during Todor Zhivkov's Communist regime. The arrest of 80-year-old Gen. Mincho Spassov followed a series of reports about the camp that have stirred memories of Stalinist repression.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | from Times Wire Services
Thousands of Bulgaria's Slavic majority defied their government and kept up protests in at least four cities Saturday to try to overturn new laws granting religious and cultural freedom for ethnic Turks. "Turks to Turkey!" and "Listen to the voice of the people!" shouted at least 2,000 people outside Parliament in Sofia, the capital. Demonstrations continued for a third day in the southern town of Kardzhali and in the northern cities of Shumen and Razgrad.
NEWS
August 18, 1989
Turkey said it is barring indefinitely the entry of a Bulgarian train that for three months has carried an average of 600 ethnic Turks into the country daily. Foreign Ministry spokesman Murat Sungar said the decision was made to protest the "disorderly and inhuman" transfer of ethnic Turks by the Bulgarian government.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | From United Press International
The Parliament declared an amnesty on Friday for Bulgarians accused of political crimes and introduced legislation that would guarantee freedom of speech and assembly. The reform measures sailed through the National Assembly as lawmakers rushed to change Bulgarian law to reflect the democratic changes embraced earlier in the week by the Communist leadership.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | Reuters
Bulgarian dissidents, struggling under one of Eastern Europe's most orthodox Communist governments, formed a group Wednesday to monitor human rights. Activist Anton Zapryanov said he and 11 others had founded the Helsinki Watch committee to check Bulgaria's compliance with the human rights provisions of the 1975 Helsinki Declaration on Security and Cooperation in Europe. Similar committees exist in Western European countries as well as in Czechoslovakia and Hungary.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | From Reuters
Strikes and mass protests by Bulgarians opposed to new freedoms for ethnic Turks paralyzed towns and cities across the country Friday. What started as a token two-hour stoppage in the southern town of Kurdzhali five days ago grew into a general strike that spread throughout the country. Shops and factories closed in Kurdzhali and the nearby town of Haskovo, as well as in Stara Zagora and Devnia, site of the country's biggest chemical plant.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | from Times Wire Services
Thousands of Bulgaria's Slavic majority defied their government and kept up protests in at least four cities Saturday to try to overturn new laws granting religious and cultural freedom for ethnic Turks. "Turks to Turkey!" and "Listen to the voice of the people!" shouted at least 2,000 people outside Parliament in Sofia, the capital. Demonstrations continued for a third day in the southern town of Kardzhali and in the northern cities of Shumen and Razgrad.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | From Reuters
Strikes and mass protests by Bulgarians opposed to new freedoms for ethnic Turks paralyzed towns and cities across the country Friday. What started as a token two-hour stoppage in the southern town of Kurdzhali five days ago grew into a general strike that spread throughout the country. Shops and factories closed in Kurdzhali and the nearby town of Haskovo, as well as in Stara Zagora and Devnia, site of the country's biggest chemical plant.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | From United Press International
The Parliament declared an amnesty on Friday for Bulgarians accused of political crimes and introduced legislation that would guarantee freedom of speech and assembly. The reform measures sailed through the National Assembly as lawmakers rushed to change Bulgarian law to reflect the democratic changes embraced earlier in the week by the Communist leadership.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | From Reuters
More than 4,000 Bulgarians shouting "Democracy!" and "Glasnost!" rallied Friday outside the National Assembly in that country's first mass protest in four decades of Communist rule. The cheering but orderly crowd had joined a brief march organized by an unofficial ecology group to present lawmakers with a petition on environmental problems. "It was electrifying, the biggest sign of hope that seems to be mounting here," said one Western diplomat in the crowd.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | Reuters
Bulgarian dissidents, struggling under one of Eastern Europe's most orthodox Communist governments, formed a group Wednesday to monitor human rights. Activist Anton Zapryanov said he and 11 others had founded the Helsinki Watch committee to check Bulgaria's compliance with the human rights provisions of the 1975 Helsinki Declaration on Security and Cooperation in Europe. Similar committees exist in Western European countries as well as in Czechoslovakia and Hungary.
NEWS
August 30, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration recalled its ambassador to Bulgaria, Sol Polansky, on Tuesday to protest the Sofia regime's continuing oppression of the country's ethnic Turkish minority, which has caused about 310,000 people to flee to Turkey in the past three months. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said Polansky was ordered to return to Washington "for consultations." On the traditional list of diplomatic gestures, the action is less severe than a formal breach in relations.
NEWS
August 18, 1989
Turkey said it is barring indefinitely the entry of a Bulgarian train that for three months has carried an average of 600 ethnic Turks into the country daily. Foreign Ministry spokesman Murat Sungar said the decision was made to protest the "disorderly and inhuman" transfer of ethnic Turks by the Bulgarian government.
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