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Human Rights Chile

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May 13, 1988 | CARLA HALL, The Washington Post
"There have been two parts to my life," Carmen Gloria Quintana, 20 years old, begins, "one before the 2nd of July 1986, and what's come after." She speaks in soft, steady Spanish, and sits erectly in a hotel room chair, her posture stiffened perhaps by the therapeutic body garment, a Jobst stocking, which encases her from neck to feet under her slacks, blouse and sweater. It covers both hands like a pair of gloves with the fingertips cut out.
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NEWS
July 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Gen. Augusto Pinochet cannot be tried on human rights charges because of his deteriorating health and mental condition, a divided court ruled Monday, in effect bringing the 85-year-old former dictator's legal troubles to an end. The ruling said Pinochet suffers from such severe dementia that he cannot be prosecuted on charges of covering up 75 murders by the "caravan of death," an army unit that toured northern Chile by helicopter shortly after his 1973 coup, eliminating suspected leftists.
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NEWS
July 10, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The demons of memory stalked Pedro Alejandro Matta from the Mack truck assembly line in Hayward to the streets where he worked as a private detective to his bungalow in a San Francisco suburb. There was no escape from Villa Grimaldi. When the Chilean refugee closed his eyes, he was back in the concentration camp on the outskirts of Santiago, an elegant 19th century estate converted into the dictatorship's biggest clandestine detention center.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
Gen. Augusto Pinochet, who once ruled Chile unchallenged, was put under house arrest Wednesday after he was formally notified that he faces homicide and kidnapping charges. Angry supporters of the former ruler shouted insults as two vehicles carrying court officials and police officers sped to Pinochet's countryside home in Bucalemu, 80 miles southwest of Santiago, the capital, to serve him notice that Judge Juan Guzman had indicted him and ordered his house arrest.
NEWS
February 26, 1987
A Chilean army commander, whose troops allegedly burned to death a U.S. resident last summer, was forced to resign because he failed to inform his superiors about the incident, an army statement said. Col. Rene Munoz Bruce's regiment allegedly attacked Rodrigo Rojas, 19, of Washington, D.C., and Carmen Quintana, a Chilean national, during anti-government demonstrations July 2, 1986, in Santiago. Witnesses said Munoz's troops poured a flammable liquid on Rojas and Quintana and set them afire.
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | From Associated Press
Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, in an impassioned plea for the release of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, declared Wednesday that the former Chilean dictator is on trial "for defeating communism." "Make no mistake, revenge by the left, not justice for the victim, is what the Pinochet case is all about," she told a packed rally held in conjunction with the Conservative Party's annual conference.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1990 | PABLO BACHELET
Some of the pop world's most acclaimed artists will gather here Friday to sing Bob Marley's "Get Up, Stand Up," kicking off Amnesty International's latest consciousness-raising concert. The setting for the two-day event--which will feature Sting, Peter Gabriel, Jackson Browne, Sinead O'Connor and New Kids on the Block, among others--will be the National Stadium, a powerful symbol of Chile's sad record of human rights violations.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 |
A judge asked a Chilean court Monday to strip Gen. Augusto Pinochet of his congressional immunity so that the former dictator could stand trial for what has come to be known as "the caravan of death"--the killing and disappearance of 72 dissidents in the days after his 1973 coup.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
Britain's highest court wrapped up hearings Thursday to determine Gen. Augusto Pinochet's fate, with opposing lawyers contending that human rights law would be reduced to a "meek little mouse" if he goes free. The judges from the House of Lords said they would begin private considerations and announce "in due course" their ruling on whether the former Chilean dictator is immune from prosecution for crimes against humanity that he is accused of committing during his 17-year rule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1999 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Chileans who suffered abuses under military rule cheered the British court ruling Wednesday that former dictator Augusto Pinochet is not immune from prosecution for human rights atrocities, but were disappointed by the limitations it imposed on the bid to extradite him to Spain.
NEWS
January 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
A Chilean judge Tuesday questioned Augusto Pinochet for the first time in his three-year probe into the former strongman's alleged role in human rights abuses. Judge Juan Guzman was in the retired general's secluded home outside Santiago for two hours. But Guillermo Garin, a Pinochet ally, said the questioning lasted only a few minutes.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise decision that could help former dictator Augusto Pinochet elude trial, Chile's Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that the retired general must undergo mental tests before he is interrogated by a judge seeking to indict him on murder and kidnapping charges. The court issued the ruling just as Chileans prepared for a long-awaited showdown: Today, the special magistrate had been scheduled to question Pinochet, 85, about alleged crimes during his 17-year military regime.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | From Reuters
The Chilean Supreme Court on Tuesday finished hearing an appeal to overturn an order that blocked the arrest of Augusto Pinochet, but it did not reveal the verdict. The five judges voted on the appeal but chose not to disclose their decision until the full verdict was transcribed, a court official said. Human rights lawyers were bidding to quash a lower court's ruling Dec.
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Former dictator Augusto Pinochet, facing possible trial for human rights abuses while he was in power, urged Chileans to put the past behind them and focus on the future. He made the call in a brief handwritten letter addressed to the Chilean people on National Unity Day, a public holiday tied to the anniversary of his military coup on Sept. 11, 1973.
NEWS
August 9, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and EVA VERGARA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Chilean Supreme Court stripped former dictator Augusto Pinochet of his immunity from prosecution Tuesday, in a decision that dealt the beleaguered senator-for-life his worst defeat ever in his homeland and reaffirmed the strength of Chile's democracy.
NEWS
August 7, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In October 1973, when Augusto Pinochet was making his mark on Chile, death rode a puma through the sky. The Puma helicopter carried a six-member army squad led by a general who was a special emissary of the dictator himself. These men roamed the north, massacring political prisoners--at least 72 victims in all. The "caravan of death" became a symbol of the regime's thuggish swagger and murderous efficiency. Even fellow soldiers were horrified. Gen.
NEWS
January 19, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet is not immune from prosecution as a former head of state because he committed many crimes before he seized power, lawyers for the British and Spanish governments told Britain's highest court Monday. The lawyers, seeking Pinochet's extradition to Spain on charges of murder, torture and kidnapping, made the argument on the opening day of an unprecedented rehearing of the court's own case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Francisco Letelier came to Washington, he thought his family was finally safe from the soldiers who ousted Chile's democratic government and held his father at a bleak island prison. That assurance vanished in 1976, when he was pulled out of high school to find that his father, Chilean pro-democracy exile leader Orlando Letelier, was killed a mile from the White House by a car bomb. An American colleague, Ronni Moffitt, died with him.
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sources on both sides of the case said Wednesday that they believed Chile's Supreme Court had stripped former dictator Augusto Pinochet of his immunity from prosecution, but the chief justice insisted that the court would not disclose its ruling until the justices have written their opinions. The court is considering Pinochet's appeal of a lower court ruling in May that removed his immunity in a case involving crimes by a military death squad in October 1973.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Chile's Supreme Court is expected to rule today on whether former dictator Augusto Pinochet, 84, will be stripped of his immunity from prosecution and tried for alleged rights abuses. A simple majority vote from the full Supreme Court will decide Pinochet's fate. The ruling cannot be appealed.
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