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Human Rights China

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NEWS
July 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Members of the first foreign delegation invited to examine human rights in China arrived in Beijing. They said the 12-day visit probably won't prompt vast changes but that it signals an important policy shift.
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OPINION
January 21, 2011
There are many metrics by which to judge the summit between President Obama and Chinese President Hu Jintao, but one has attracted the most attention: Did Obama adequately stand up for human rights in China? Much as we would have preferred a more full-throated criticism of China's abysmal record ? including the imprisonment of Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo ? we recognize that Obama was required to balance principle and protocol. The principle part took place largely in private.
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NEWS
July 27, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reflection of the wide gap that still divides Washington and Beijing, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said Thursday that the Bush administration intends to follow up on the release of three scholars convicted of espionage by pressing China on the fate of other detainees with U.S. connections.
WORLD
October 8, 2010 | By Janet Stobart and Megan Stack, Los Angeles Times
The 2010 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded Friday to Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo "for his long and nonviolent struggle for fundamental human rights in China. " The award dealt a resounding slap to the Chinese government, which called the decision a "blasphemy" and warned that relations with Norway would be damaged. "Liu Xiaobo is a convicted criminal who broke Chinese law," Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said in a statement published on the ministry website. "If the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to such a person, it absolutely disobeyed the spirit of this prize and it is a blasphemy to the prize.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Chinese police have detained three dissidents, including one taken from a hospital bed as he was being treated for heart and lung ailments stemming from abuse during 11 years in prison, human rights groups said. Labor activist Li Wangyang was removed May 6 from a hospital in Shaoyang, a city in Hunan province, and charged with subversion, New York-based Human Rights in China said.
NEWS
August 17, 1989
A Chinese student leader told a U.N. Human Rights Committee that 120,000 people may have been secretly killed since the June crackdown on pro-democracy protests. Li Lu gave the estimate at a meeting in Geneva of the U.N. Subcommission on the Prevention of Discrimination. Li, on Beijing's most-wanted list for his role in the student-led movement, urged the panel to condemn China for human rights violations.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
Fellow prisoners severely beat dissident Wei Jingsheng after being promised reduced sentences if they attacked him, human rights advocates charged Thursday. They said the beating seriously worsened Wei's already poor health. The 46-year-old Wei, China's most famous dissident, is serving a 14-year sentence at a prison in northern Hebei province near Beijing for advocating democratic reforms.
NEWS
April 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
One of China's few active dissidents has been sentenced to two years in a labor camp, a human rights group said Saturday. Authorities told Shen Liangqing's mother that he was being punished for contacting foreign human rights groups and reporters, a Hong Kong human rights monitoring group said. Shen, 35, was detained during a February roundup of people who had petitioned the Chinese legislature before its annual session.
NEWS
May 2, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
"The next sound you hear is the sound of freedom of speech in Communist China," begins a radio ad sponsored by the Family Research Council. What follows is silence. The ad is part of a well-financed campaign by the religious right opposing renewal of most-favored-nation trade status for China on grounds that the Chinese are engaged in religious persecution. The announcer continues: "And now the sound of Chinese Christians singing their favorite hymns at an open church service." More silence.
NEWS
September 3, 1995 | Associated Press
A leading Chinese dissident has been arrested for refusing to report his thoughts to police, a human rights group said Saturday. Officials ordered Liu Gang to report his thoughts to police every week after they released him from prison in June. He served a six-year sentence for his leading role in the 1989 Tian An Men Square democracy movement.
SPORTS
March 15, 2009 | Associated Press
"The decision in 2001 to give the games to China was made in the hope of improvement in human rights and, indeed, the Chinese themselves said that having the games would accelerate progress in such matters." -- IOC member Dick Pound in his book "Inside the Olympics." -- One political issue overshadowed the rest when International Olympic Committee members voted in 2001 to award the Summer Games to Beijing -- human rights. Tibetan activists demonstrated against the bid near the Moscow convention center where the secret ballot was held, and Russian police broke up small protests by free-speech advocates.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The United Nations' top human rights official told Chinese leaders Friday that efforts to combat terrorism must not infringe on the human rights of China's Muslim minorities. U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson told officials that, since the Sept. 11 attacks in the United States, her office had seen an increase in allegations of summary execution, imprisonment and torture of ethnic Uighurs in the Xinjiang region in northwestern China.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | ANUJ GUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department voiced its strong displeasure Monday with Chinese state television's decision to edit out comments on Taiwan and human rights from an interview with Secretary of State Colin L. Powell it broadcast over the weekend. The U.S. Embassy in China had an agreement with Chinese Central Television that Saturday's interview would be aired in its entirety, department officials said.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reflection of the wide gap that still divides Washington and Beijing, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said Thursday that the Bush administration intends to follow up on the release of three scholars convicted of espionage by pressing China on the fate of other detainees with U.S. connections.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The International Olympic Committee on Friday awarded the 2008 Summer Games to Beijing, a decision that for the first time brings the Games to the world's most-populous nation. In a secret ballot that critics said ignored concerns about China's record on human rights, the IOC chose Beijing over Toronto; Paris; Istanbul, Turkey; and Osaka, Japan.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush ordered toughened enforcement of long-standing sanctions against Cuba on Friday and said he would also expand support for human rights activists on the Communist-run island. "The sanctions the United States enforces against the Castro regime are not just a policy tool but a moral statement," Bush said. "It is wrong to prop up a regime that routinely stifles all the freedoms that make us human."
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
Reports that veteran dissident Wei Jingsheng has been beaten by other prisoners and is in ill health are "sheer fabrications," China's Justice Ministry said Saturday. The statement issued via the state-run New China News Agency was China's first direct comment on reports by his family and human rights groups that Wei was severely injured by prisoners hoping to get reduced sentences for attacking him.
NEWS
March 9, 1994 | from Times Staff and Wire Reports
Secretary of State Warren Christopher issued a new warning Tuesday to China that its human rights policies, and particularly its detention of several dissidents over the past week, are spoiling the atmosphere for the visit to Beijing he will make on Friday and are jeopardizing China's future trade privileges in the United States. "It would be hard to overstate the strong distaste we all feel" for China's recent behavior, he said at a news conference.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a dozen adherents of the outlawed Falun Gong meditation movement apparently died last month in a Chinese labor camp in what the government says was a mass suicide but the group's representatives allege was the result of brutal mistreatment. A government official in northeastern Heilongjiang province said that 14 Falun Gong followers hanged themselves June 20 in the Wanjia labor camp, the Associated Press reported today.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Chinese police have detained three dissidents, including one taken from a hospital bed as he was being treated for heart and lung ailments stemming from abuse during 11 years in prison, human rights groups said. Labor activist Li Wangyang was removed May 6 from a hospital in Shaoyang, a city in Hunan province, and charged with subversion, New York-based Human Rights in China said.
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