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Human Rights Cuba

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NEWS
November 4, 1988 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
A member of the first U.S. delegation to visit Cuba's quarantine center for people infected with the AIDS-causing human immunodeficiency virus Thursday described the detention facility as "pleasant" but "frightening in its implications." The first detailed picture of what the Cuban government calls its "sanitarium" for all identified HIV carriers was painted by Ronald Bayer, associate professor at Columbia University's School of Public Health, in an interview with The Times.
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NEWS
April 23, 2002 | Associated Press
Calling Mexico's human rights vote against Cuba "the last straw," an angry President Fidel Castro on Monday played a recording of Mexican President Vicente Fox encouraging him not to attend a U.N. conference last month--contradicting Mexican officials' earlier account of Castro's sudden departure from the gathering.
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NEWS
August 4, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Of all the places to interview Ricardo Bofill, a dissident who confronts the government of Cuba on human rights abuses, his apartment on the outskirts of Havana might seem the least likely. The apartment is one floor above the residence of the local representative of the Committee for the Defense of the Revolution, the Cuban government's grass-roots vigilance network.
NEWS
April 18, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was well into the seventh inning during the opening game of Cuba's national baseball finals earlier this month when more than a dozen police officers lined the right-field fence, apparently to keep the crowd off the field: "Palestinians! Palestinians! Palestinians!" thousands of fans began to chant, using a derisive nickname many in this capital have for the island's provincial easterners.
NEWS
June 3, 1988
Three leading members of Cuba's unofficial human rights group have received permission to emigrate to the United States and will leave Havana for Miami tonight, Enrique Hernandez Mendez, a vice president of the self-styled Cuban Human Rights Committee, said. Hernandez said that he and two other dissidents, Ramon Guin and Edmigio Lopez Castillo, will be granted refugee status in the United States.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Dec. 19, Orestes Lorenzo Perez, a Cuban military pilot who had defected to the United States in 1991, took a daring risk. Flying a small, aging plane back into Cuba, he landed in the middle of a crowded highway, picked up his wife and two sons and returned to this country. When Lorenzo's plane landed in the Florida Keys, it was met by a group of supporters, including a representative of the Valladares Foundation, the Virginia-based human rights organization that helped set up the rescue.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
Imagine a man sinking in muddy water until it reaches his lips. Then the years go by. Twenty-six years. Finally, that man is taken out and put in the middle of the city where there is walking and buses and signs of life. Ask that man how he feels, I don't know that he could tell you. He has no eyes for wonders. He is amazed only that he is free and his companions are not. He is free--and yet still wishes to be with them. Now imagine I am that man.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
In one of the most important human rights cases in Cuba in years, a court sentenced a leading dissident Monday to five years in prison and gave three co-defendants lesser terms for stirring up unrest against the government of Fidel Castro. A five-member tribunal tried Vladimiro Roca, a former military pilot and son of the late Cuban Communist Party leader Blas Roca, and three others behind closed doors the first week of March.
NEWS
April 24, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. Commission on Human Rights, meeting in Geneva, passed a U.S.-backed motion of censure against Cuba for violating human rights but did not take similar action against China. With more than half the members of the 53-nation forum abstaining, the commission voted 20 to 5 to adopt the resolution criticizing Cuba.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Communist government announced it has detained eight leading human rights activists, accusing them of helping prepare for a U.S. invasion. The arrests were announced by the state media in a clear break from a past policy of official silence on such detentions. Unofficial statements identified the detainees as leading members of the Pro-Human Rights Party of Cuba, an outlawed rights group.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
In one of the most important human rights cases in Cuba in years, a court sentenced a leading dissident Monday to five years in prison and gave three co-defendants lesser terms for stirring up unrest against the government of Fidel Castro. A five-member tribunal tried Vladimiro Roca, a former military pilot and son of the late Cuban Communist Party leader Blas Roca, and three others behind closed doors the first week of March.
NEWS
December 27, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the decadent decades before Fidel Castro's Communist Party took power and outlawed elitism, the Havana Biltmore Yacht and Country Club was the very symbol of Cuban wealth and exclusivity. Its aristocratic parties were renowned in the '40s, its pristine beach reserved for members and its 18-hole golf course off limits even to most tourists. So exclusive was the Biltmore that Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista is said to have been denied membership because of his ethnic roots.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | From Reuters
Fidel Castro on Tuesday rebuffed an appeal for political changes and prisoner releases made by Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien during a groundbreaking visit to Cuba. Immediately after seeing Chretien off at the airport, Castro declared: "We are not going to change. We are going to continue defending our cause and our socialism." The Cuban leader made it clear to reporters that he will not bend to pressure for reforms.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | From Reuters
The U.N. Commission on Human Rights dealt the United States a major diplomatic blow Tuesday, defeating its resolution criticizing Cuba over human rights and political prisoners. The 53-member body also condemned "systematic, widespread and extremely grave violations" in Iraq and renewed the mandate of its investigator, former Dutch Foreign Minister Max van der Stoel.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly 40 years, Canada has cultivated what its ambassador to Cuba, Mark Entwistle, calls "a special relationship" with President Fidel Castro's government. Now, it is testing that relationship in a risky and controversial effort to improve human rights in the island dictatorship.
NEWS
April 24, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. Commission on Human Rights, meeting in Geneva, passed a U.S.-backed motion of censure against Cuba for violating human rights but did not take similar action against China. With more than half the members of the 53-nation forum abstaining, the commission voted 20 to 5 to adopt the resolution criticizing Cuba.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush marked Cuba's independence day by calling on Fidel Castro to free political prisoners, hold fair elections and let a U.N. commission investigate allegations of human rights violations. In a challenge to Castro, Bush laid down requirements for improved relations with the United States.
NEWS
June 6, 1988
As part of an effort to clean up his human rights image, Cuban President Fidel Castro has said he will release all but 44 of his country's political prisoners, the New York Times reported. Castro announced his decision in a letter to Cardinal John O'Connor of New York, the newspaper said. The cardinal recently returned from a visit to Cuba but could not be reached for immediate comment.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Former Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca was here recently. So were executives from major U.S. pharmaceutical companies. And when Cuban officials hosted a reception in New York for U.S. businesses last month, about 100 firms showed up. After more than three decades in which Cuba has been virtually off-limits to American business, there is a sense among many U.S. firms that change may be in the air. This mood blends nicely with the hope among government officials and ordinary citizens here that U.S.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Dec. 19, Orestes Lorenzo Perez, a Cuban military pilot who had defected to the United States in 1991, took a daring risk. Flying a small, aging plane back into Cuba, he landed in the middle of a crowded highway, picked up his wife and two sons and returned to this country. When Lorenzo's plane landed in the Florida Keys, it was met by a group of supporters, including a representative of the Valladares Foundation, the Virginia-based human rights organization that helped set up the rescue.
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