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February 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel, on his way to Canada and the United States, stopped over to meet Iceland's president Saturday and attended a play he wrote but had never seen performed. The playwright president told reporters he decided to visit Reykjavik because the city is a symbol of peace--a reference to the U.S.-Soviet summit in 1986. Havel talked with reporters before attending a production in Icelandic of his play "Slum Clearance."
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NEWS
September 9, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moments after touchdown here Saturday, President Bush paid tribute to the exceptional role this locale has already played in reshaping the postwar world. "The city of Helsinki has often been a meeting place for nations seeking to advance the cause of peace," Bush said after stepping off Air Force One. He expressed hope that his talks with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev here will help lay "the cornerstone" of a safer world order.
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NEWS
January 18, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, marking the end of his diplomatic career, said Tuesday that the world is "entering a period in which respect for human rights is gaining ground" although some Marxist governments, such as Czechoslovakia's and East Germany's, are lagging behind the Soviet Union. In a speech and a press conference at the final session of the two-year-old Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe, Shultz praised Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The industrialized world's 24 richest nations approved a U.S.-backed plan Wednesday to give economic aid only to countries committed to human rights, multi-party democracy and free-market economics. The so-called Group of 24, which is already coordinating a $14-billion aid package for Poland and Hungary, agreed to add Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia and East Germany to the program but rejected both Romania and the Soviet Union.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why did events come out so differently this year in Eastern Europe than in China? Why did the movements toward democratic changes succeed in Warsaw, Prague, Budapest and East Berlin while failing in Beijing? Scholars point to several factors that help explain why the Chinese regime was willing and able to carry out a forceful crackdown while East European governments were not.
NEWS
December 17, 1989
In the gray and deliberate world of diplomacy, there are moments when decisions are made and agreements are reached whose importance is understood only afterward. It can be a painstaking and finely bargained process, the work of diplomats, and its significance often lies buried in its very detail. January 19 was a quiet Sunday morning, bitterly cold in Vienna. Outside the Austria Center, the flags of 35 nations flapped impressively in the wind. It was a day of ceremony, yet curiously low key.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moments after touchdown here Saturday, President Bush paid tribute to the exceptional role this locale has already played in reshaping the postwar world. "The city of Helsinki has often been a meeting place for nations seeking to advance the cause of peace," Bush said after stepping off Air Force One. He expressed hope that his talks with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev here will help lay "the cornerstone" of a safer world order.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The industrialized world's 24 richest nations approved a U.S.-backed plan Wednesday to give economic aid only to countries committed to human rights, multi-party democracy and free-market economics. The so-called Group of 24, which is already coordinating a $14-billion aid package for Poland and Hungary, agreed to add Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia and East Germany to the program but rejected both Romania and the Soviet Union.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III fired off a telegram to the Soviet Foreign Ministry Wednesday, "insisting" that Moscow reverse its position and admit a congressional delegation to monitor Saturday's elections in Lithuania, U.S. officials said. Rep. C. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach), one of four members of the observer delegation, said he was informed of Baker's action Wednesday afternoon as he and his three colleagues waited in a West Berlin hotel for a resolution of the impasse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1987 | TONY P. HALL, Rep. Tony P. Hall (D-Ohio) is co-author of the legislation to suspend Romania's most-favored-nation status and chairman of the International Task Force of the House Select Committee on Hunger
In the next few days, President Reagan may decide to continue most-favored-nation trade status to Romania for another year. Or, he will take a strong stand for human rights by carrying out the House recommendation to temporarily suspend the status which provides vital U.S. trade concessions to one of the most austere economies in Europe. During recent consideration of the trade bill, the House agreed to lift Romania's most-favored-nation status for six months.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel, on his way to Canada and the United States, stopped over to meet Iceland's president Saturday and attended a play he wrote but had never seen performed. The playwright president told reporters he decided to visit Reykjavik because the city is a symbol of peace--a reference to the U.S.-Soviet summit in 1986. Havel talked with reporters before attending a production in Icelandic of his play "Slum Clearance."
NEWS
December 17, 1989
In the gray and deliberate world of diplomacy, there are moments when decisions are made and agreements are reached whose importance is understood only afterward. It can be a painstaking and finely bargained process, the work of diplomats, and its significance often lies buried in its very detail. January 19 was a quiet Sunday morning, bitterly cold in Vienna. Outside the Austria Center, the flags of 35 nations flapped impressively in the wind. It was a day of ceremony, yet curiously low key.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why did events come out so differently this year in Eastern Europe than in China? Why did the movements toward democratic changes succeed in Warsaw, Prague, Budapest and East Berlin while failing in Beijing? Scholars point to several factors that help explain why the Chinese regime was willing and able to carry out a forceful crackdown while East European governments were not.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, marking the end of his diplomatic career, said Tuesday that the world is "entering a period in which respect for human rights is gaining ground" although some Marxist governments, such as Czechoslovakia's and East Germany's, are lagging behind the Soviet Union. In a speech and a press conference at the final session of the two-year-old Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe, Shultz praised Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
House Democrats angry about the Bush Administration's overtures to China predicted Tuesday that there will be strong bipartisan support when Congress tries to override President Bush's veto of a bill aiding Chinese students in this country. "I think we have enough to override," said California Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1990 | RUDOLF L. TOKES, Rudolf L. Tokes is a professor of political science at the University of Connecticut.
The sight of angry East Germans storming and ransacking buildings occupied by the secret police might upset those who expected the Communist regimes of Eastern Europe to quietly fade away once the Erich Honeckers, the Milos Jakes, the Todor Zhivkovs and the Nicolae Ceausescus were overthrown. Lest we believe Gregor Gysi, the new East German party boss, that the unruly mobs "succumbed to violence directed at property," we should ask: What kind of property came under attack?
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