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NEWS
December 11, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Thousands of demonstrators, many chanting for the release of a U.S. church worker imprisoned in Central America, paraded through Seattle in a "March for Human Rights in El Salvador." Many of the estimated 2,000 protesters carried crosses, while others pounded drums as they chanted slogans supporting human rights. Signs carried by some of the demonstrators said "U.S. Imperialism out of El Salvador" and "Free Jennifer Casolo," the U.S.
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NEWS
October 26, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid a surge in politically tinged violence, a prominent member of El Salvador's former guerrilla front was shot to death Monday morning as he took his small child to a day care center. The murder of Francisco Velis came as U.N. peacekeepers are denouncing an alarming resurgence in rightist death-squad-style killings 10 months after the end of El Salvador's brutal civil war. Such murders not only are on the rise but are not being adequately investigated, the United Nations says in a new report.
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NEWS
April 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush welcomed President-elect Alfredo Cristiani of El Salvador to the White House on Friday, assuring him of U.S. support for his rightist government in battling leftist rebels. Cristiani and a White House statement issued after their Oval Office meeting said that the two discussed a shared commitment to democracy and protection of human rights in El Salvador.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A State Department panel concluded Thursday that U.S. diplomats reported honestly and fully on human rights abuses in El Salvador during the 1980s but that higher officials in Washington sometimes distorted their reports for political reasons. The largely laudatory report abruptly reopened the 13-year-old debate over U.S. policy in Central America, and it prompted human rights activists and liberal Democrats in Congress to charge the State Department with whitewashing its own performance.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A State Department panel concluded Thursday that U.S. diplomats reported honestly and fully on human rights abuses in El Salvador during the 1980s but that higher officials in Washington sometimes distorted their reports for political reasons. The largely laudatory report abruptly reopened the 13-year-old debate over U.S. policy in Central America, and it prompted human rights activists and liberal Democrats in Congress to charge the State Department with whitewashing its own performance.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration praised El Salvador on Monday for admitting military involvement in the recent slayings of six Jesuit priests, but members of Congress suggested that continued U.S. military support for the tiny Central American nation might be in jeopardy unless the killers are punished.
NEWS
March 9, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Vice President Dan Quayle's trip here last month to demand that the government end human rights violations or face the loss of American aid has had almost no impact, with the number of killings actually increasing since his visit, according to diplomats and human rights groups. In the month before the vice president's February trip, the number of civilian deaths attributed to death squads and the military was eight. However, since Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
One man told of being forced into a pool of electrified water. A teacher testified that he was dragged out of the classroom over his students' wails of protest and interrogated for 15 days about a kidnaping he knew nothing about. Raul Sosa Rodriguez was 14 years old when government agents lined him up with a dozen other prisoners along the edge of a cliff and began killing them one by one with machetes, hurtling their bodies onto the rocks below.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1989 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
A fiery Catholic priest is mourning the plight of war-ravaged Central Americans before an auditorium full of college students. "One out of every four babies starves to death in El Salvador," he says. "One out of four. The U.S. spends $1 million a day down there. (But) U.S. foreign aid doesn't buy food. It buys weapons. The army has them. The rebels have them. The death squads have them. What do the people have? They have poverty, no sanitation, no land reform and their schools under siege.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Government and leftist rebel leaders have agreed to a timetable for purging dozens of abusive and corrupt officers from El Salvador's armed forces, a senior U.N. official said Saturday. The agreement apparently resolves the most serious crisis to hit El Salvador's peace accords since the end of a brutal 12-year civil war in January, but the military's reaction will likely be decisive. "It looks like we have total agreement.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The top officers of El Salvador's armed forces were removed from duty Thursday in a U.N.-ordered purge of human rights abusers, marking the end of an era in which a single generation of U.S.-trained officers controlled the army and dominated wartime society. President Alfredo Cristiani, acting six months late, replaced Defense Minister Gen. Rene Emilio Ponce and ordered a complete overhaul of the military high command. He also ordered changes in key military posts around the country.
NEWS
March 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Salvadoran Supreme Court rejected Friday the findings of a report on human rights violations that recommended, among other things, the removal of the justices. The court disputed the Truth Commission's finding that the judges obstructed investigations into some of the rights violations during the past decade, when the U.S.-backed Salvadoran government battled leftist guerrillas.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration may try to thwart El Salvador's controversial new amnesty law by bringing its military officers to trial in American courts for human rights abuses committed during the Central American country's bloody 11-year civil war, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Thursday. In testimony to a House Appropriations subcommittee, he also said he is determined to ensure that the State Department will never mislead Congress about atrocities committed by friendly countries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993
About 100 demonstrators calling for the punishment of human rights violators in El Salvador briefly blocked the main entrance to the Federal Building in downtown Los Angeles Wednesday, resulting in the arrest of nine people. "Those responsible for the killings in El Salvador must be brought to justice," said Father Chris Ponnet, associate pastor at Our Lady of the Assumption Church in Claremont, who was among those arrested for blocking the entrance.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a challenge to both President Alfredo Cristiani and the United Nations, El Salvador's top military commanders angrily denounced an international investigation that blamed them for widespread wartime atrocities, and they suggested that they would fight their ouster. The bitter military response to the U.N.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid shouts of protest, the right-wing party of President Alfredo Cristiani swiftly pushed through a blanket amnesty Saturday that pardons all Salvadorans who committed political murder and other crimes during 12 years of civil war. In a stormy legislative session that showed just how fresh the war's wounds still are, the national Legislative Assembly approved the amnesty on a 47-9 vote. There were 13 abstentions, and 15 legislators were absent.
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | From Reuters
Forensic experts have unearthed the skeletons of children and babies in this remote hamlet, bolstering charges that soldiers killed hundreds of civilians in the largest massacre in El Salvador's civil war. Twenty-two battered skulls and skeletons were exhumed Monday from the ruins of a church where U.S.-trained soldiers of the elite Atlacatl Battalion allegedly began a three-day slaughter of more than 800 people in December, 1981. "They are all children and several were babies.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration may try to thwart El Salvador's controversial new amnesty law by bringing its military officers to trial in American courts for human rights abuses committed during the Central American country's bloody 11-year civil war, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Thursday. In testimony to a House Appropriations subcommittee, he also said he is determined to ensure that the State Department will never mislead Congress about atrocities committed by friendly countries.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The release this week of a United Nations report on human rights abuses in El Salvador has resurrected the decade-long debate over U.S. aid to that country and prompted Democratic calls for a thorough investigation of American involvement in one of Central America's bloodiest civil wars. Outraged by the findings of the U.N.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under mounting pressure from El Salvador's right wing, President Alfredo Cristiani on Thursday criticized a U.N. report that blames civil war crimes on state security forces, saying the findings will not contribute to healing this country's wounds. In his first public comments on the report by the U.N.-appointed Commission on Truth, Cristiani said the investigation painted an incomplete picture that dredges up ugly memories and prevents reconciliation.
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