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NEWS
February 22, 1991
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL accused members of the anti-Iraq alliance of using war as a pretext for human rights violations. The single U.S. case cited by the London-based organization was the imprisonment of a soldier who refused to help prepare military supplies for shipment to Saudi Arabia on moral and religious grounds.
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NEWS
October 2, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although soapbox orators have made Speaker's Corner a symbol of free speech for much of the world, their right to hold forth in Hyde Park is not explicitly guaranteed in British law. Similarly, Britain has no equivalent of the Fifth Amendment right to remain silent. Prosecutors have been allowed to introduce illegally obtained evidence in British trials, and police entrapment is not accepted as a defense in court.
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NEWS
October 2, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although soapbox orators have made Speaker's Corner a symbol of free speech for much of the world, their right to hold forth in Hyde Park is not explicitly guaranteed in British law. Similarly, Britain has no equivalent of the Fifth Amendment right to remain silent. Prosecutors have been allowed to introduce illegally obtained evidence in British trials, and police entrapment is not accepted as a defense in court.
NEWS
October 13, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past two weeks, British officials and Irish activists have squared off in federal court here in an unusual extradition hearing that has turned into a challenge of British rule in Northern Ireland. In proceedings that sometimes resemble the World Court, an undersecretary of state, a brigadier general, a prison governor, a member of Parliament and Irish radical Bernadette Devlin McAliskey have taken the witness stand to debate British policy in the province.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
One considers itself the fount of liberty; the other was branded not so long ago as an "evil empire." But as Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev arrived in Britain on Wednesday for the third time to hold talks with Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, it sometimes seems from the headlines as if the two countries have switched roles.
NEWS
November 30, 1988
Britain violated the human rights of four men held under anti-terrorism laws in Northern Ireland, the European Court of Human Rights ruled. The court upheld Britain's right to arrest suspected terrorists without charging them with a specific offense, but it ruled that Terrence Brogan, Dermot Coyle, William McFadden and Michael Tracey are entitled to compensation because they were denied speedy judicial hearings.
NEWS
October 13, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past two weeks, British officials and Irish activists have squared off in federal court here in an unusual extradition hearing that has turned into a challenge of British rule in Northern Ireland. In proceedings that sometimes resemble the World Court, an undersecretary of state, a brigadier general, a prison governor, a member of Parliament and Irish radical Bernadette Devlin McAliskey have taken the witness stand to debate British policy in the province.
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on Thursday angrily rejected an Amnesty International request to clarify events surrounding the killing of three Irish Republican Army terrorists in Gibraltar last month. "There will be an inquest in Gibraltar, and that is the proper occasion for the matters in question to be examined," Thatcher told Parliament.
BOOKS
March 22, 1998 | THEODORE ZELDIN, Theodore Zeldin is the author of "An Intimate History of Humanity" (HarperCollins)
John Lukacs has broken the rules of his profession. He won't lose his job (he's retired from his university), but his former colleagues will warn their students that his latest book is not real history. Of all the arts, history is the most conservative.
NEWS
February 22, 1991
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL accused members of the anti-Iraq alliance of using war as a pretext for human rights violations. The single U.S. case cited by the London-based organization was the imprisonment of a soldier who refused to help prepare military supplies for shipment to Saudi Arabia on moral and religious grounds.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
One considers itself the fount of liberty; the other was branded not so long ago as an "evil empire." But as Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev arrived in Britain on Wednesday for the third time to hold talks with Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, it sometimes seems from the headlines as if the two countries have switched roles.
NEWS
November 30, 1988
Britain violated the human rights of four men held under anti-terrorism laws in Northern Ireland, the European Court of Human Rights ruled. The court upheld Britain's right to arrest suspected terrorists without charging them with a specific offense, but it ruled that Terrence Brogan, Dermot Coyle, William McFadden and Michael Tracey are entitled to compensation because they were denied speedy judicial hearings.
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on Thursday angrily rejected an Amnesty International request to clarify events surrounding the killing of three Irish Republican Army terrorists in Gibraltar last month. "There will be an inquest in Gibraltar, and that is the proper occasion for the matters in question to be examined," Thatcher told Parliament.
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