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Human Rights Estonia

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NEWS
July 31, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 79-year-old retired KGB agent who helped send hundreds of Estonians to Siberia 50 years ago was convicted Friday of crimes against humanity and sentenced to four years in prison. Mikhail A. Neverovsky, who was found guilty of selecting 274 people for deportation and personally putting three families on a train bound for Siberia, received the harshest sentence yet in Estonia for participating in mass deportations of the Soviet era.
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NEWS
July 31, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 79-year-old retired KGB agent who helped send hundreds of Estonians to Siberia 50 years ago was convicted Friday of crimes against humanity and sentenced to four years in prison. Mikhail A. Neverovsky, who was found guilty of selecting 274 people for deportation and personally putting three families on a train bound for Siberia, received the harshest sentence yet in Estonia for participating in mass deportations of the Soviet era.
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NEWS
August 10, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
The Russian minority in the Baltic republic of Estonia went on the offensive Wednesday with scattered strikes at factories and shipyards, protesting efforts by Estonian activists to sever the republic politically and economically from Moscow. The action demonstrated the growing anger of the Russians, who have held the reins of power in the Soviet Union ever since the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution but who have been criticized by many of the country's more than 100 ethnic minorities.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
The Russian minority in the Baltic republic of Estonia went on the offensive Wednesday with scattered strikes at factories and shipyards, protesting efforts by Estonian activists to sever the republic politically and economically from Moscow. The action demonstrated the growing anger of the Russians, who have held the reins of power in the Soviet Union ever since the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution but who have been criticized by many of the country's more than 100 ethnic minorities.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian diplomats and lawmakers reacted with outrage Friday to a U.S. Senate vote linking aid to Russia to the withdrawal of Russian troops from Estonia by Aug. 31. Senior Russian diplomat Vitaly S. Churkin denounced the U.S. attempt to pressure Russia into removing remnants of the occupying Red Army from its Baltic neighbor as "counterproductive and wrong," while the lower house of Parliament condemned it as unwarranted meddling in Russia's affairs. Foreign Minister Andrei V.
OPINION
July 24, 2005 | MICHAEL KINSLEY
Cyberspace, to its early denizens, was supposed to be a prelapsarian world, free from the taint of commerce and other vices of "meatspace" (as the material world is known), full of sweetness and light and universal siblinghood. The preferred story line was Genesis in reverse: Our troubles started when Eve ate the apple of knowledge; now knowledge had accumulated to the point where it could undo the damage, reconstruct the apple (or Apple) and restore our innocence.
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