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Human Rights Hungary

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NEWS
September 28, 1989
Hungary's Parliament adopted a law giving people the right to express opinions or advocate political and social change, further expanding freedom of speech before multi-party elections next year. The bill and a related amendment of the criminal procedure law are part of a package of legislation designed to bring Hungary's laws in line with moves toward a pluralistic system and with international covenants on human rights.
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NEWS
September 28, 1989
Hungary's Parliament adopted a law giving people the right to express opinions or advocate political and social change, further expanding freedom of speech before multi-party elections next year. The bill and a related amendment of the criminal procedure law are part of a package of legislation designed to bring Hungary's laws in line with moves toward a pluralistic system and with international covenants on human rights.
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NEWS
August 9, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
From the moment she saw that supermarkets in this capital overflowed with food and that people didn't cringe automatically when police appeared, May Li began mulling the idea over in her mind. Li, who is afraid to disclose her real name or nationality for fear of reprisal, is an exchange student from a Communist country in the Far East. Here in socialist Hungary, she is learning technical skills desperately needed by her developing nation. But 30-year-old Li has other plans.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
From the moment she saw that supermarkets in this capital overflowed with food and that people didn't cringe automatically when police appeared, May Li began mulling the idea over in her mind. Li, who is afraid to disclose her real name or nationality for fear of reprisal, is an exchange student from a Communist country in the Far East. Here in socialist Hungary, she is learning technical skills desperately needed by her developing nation. But 30-year-old Li has other plans.
NEWS
August 6, 1990 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, TIMES INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CORRESPONDENT
As far back as Thomas Jefferson, Americans have been quick--some say too quick--to let loose with economic sanctions in international disputes. In modern times, these gentler means of persuasion, which Jefferson called "peaceful coercion," usually have failed because too many ways around them existed.
NEWS
July 6, 1987 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
In their book-lined studies less than 500 miles apart, two white-haired history professors are modern-day versions of medieval champions sent forth to defend the honor of their realms. But for Stefan Pascu, a Romanian, and Laszlo Makkai, a Hungarian, the weapons are scholarly works and artifacts left by a people who lived more than 2,000 years ago. The two are in the forefront of a dispute that has its roots deep in the past, a tug-of-war over the people of the region known as Transylvania.
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