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Human Rights Iran

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2000
A nonprofit Iranian watchdog organization will hold a daylong symposium Saturday at Occidental College on reports of human rights abuses in the Middle Eastern country. The symposium, which is free and runs from 11:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. at Thorne Hall, will feature Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Huntington Beach), scholars and human rights activists. Five former political prisoners from Iran will also speak about their experiences.
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WORLD
June 5, 2009 | Christi Parsons and Jeffrey Fleishman
President Obama's sweeping call Thursday for a "new beginning" between the United States and the Islamic world was greeted by Muslims of many countries as a conciliatory gesture aimed at setting aside suspicion and moving ahead on problems that include terrorism and the Arab-Israeli conflict. The 55-minute address at Cairo University, which was widely translated and sent across the Internet, did little to sway hardened enemies such as Iran.
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NEWS
November 4, 1988
A U.N. report on human rights in Iran says "a renewed wave of executions" occurred at about the time the country's Islamic fundamentalist government agreed to a cease-fire in its war with Iraq. The report to the General Assembly calls for continued scrutiny of Tehran's human rights practices, citing executions of political dissidents and other reports of abuses.
NEWS
June 29, 2001 | Associated Press
Iran's hard-line watchdog body has rejected legislation aimed at guaranteeing public trials by jury for government critics and protecting the rights of political prisoners, newspapers reported Thursday. The Guardian Council, whose oversight role is intended to ensure that statutes do not violate the Iranian Constitution or Islamic law, rejected the "political crime" bill approved by parliament in late May, the government-owned daily Iran reported.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | Associated Press
A U.N. report released Thursday says at least 7,000 people were executed in Iran between 1979 and 1985 and cites allegations that torture in the country continues to be widespread. But the report, compiled by Reynaldo Galindo Pohl of El Salvador for the 43-nation U.N. Human Rights Commission, notes a "certain (positive) evolution in the situation of human rights" in Iran.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gholamreza Mohajeri Nejad sat on the edge of his chair, his machine-gun-fire pitch for a free and democratic Iran interrupted every few minutes by an impassive clerk calling another political asylum seeker to the Immigration and Naturalization Service counter in Anaheim. "I'm surprised they haven't called me yet," the 29-year-old Iranian rebel said Thursday morning in his native Persian, his eyes locked on two applicants who jumped up as their number was called.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With each succeeding lash to his back, the bound man sagged deeper, oblivious to the cries of "God is great!" from the crowd. They gathered to watch the slow, painful death of a soldier convicted by a clergy-run Iranian court. The charge: moral corruption. Two others were buried up to their chests and then stoned to death for the same crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trace of repeated beatings for secular thought linger on Gholam Reza Mohajery-Nejad's face: a crooked nose, the slight indentation in one cheekbone, the haunted look in dark eyes as he recounts 130 days of torture in a windowless Iranian prison. It is the same infamous prison that Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei was sent to for opposing the former shah.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States moved quickly Thursday to prevent troubling developments in Iran, including the test-launch of a medium-range missile and the imposition of a stiff prison sentence on a leading reformer, from derailing efforts to open a dialogue with Tehran.
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | Associated Press
A former Iranian intelligence agent said Saturday that he participated in the 1998 killings of dissident writers and intellectuals, state-run television reported. Seyyed Mostafa Kazemi, the first of 17 defendants to testify, said during the closed court session that he had a role in ordering the killings, Iranian TV reported without providing any details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gholamreza Mohajeri Nejad sat on the edge of his chair, his machine-gun-fire pitch for a free and democratic Iran interrupted every few minutes by an impassive clerk calling another political asylum seeker to the Immigration and Naturalization Service counter in Anaheim. "I'm surprised they haven't called me yet," the 29-year-old Iranian rebel said Thursday morning in his native Persian, his eyes locked on two applicants who jumped up as their number was called.
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | Associated Press
A former Iranian intelligence agent said Saturday that he participated in the 1998 killings of dissident writers and intellectuals, state-run television reported. Seyyed Mostafa Kazemi, the first of 17 defendants to testify, said during the closed court session that he had a role in ordering the killings, Iranian TV reported without providing any details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trace of repeated beatings for secular thought linger on Gholam Reza Mohajery-Nejad's face: a crooked nose, the slight indentation in one cheekbone, the haunted look in dark eyes as he recounts 130 days of torture in a windowless Iranian prison. It is the same infamous prison that Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei was sent to for opposing the former shah.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi wrapped up the Southern California portion of an unprecedented tour of the United States on Saturday night, telling a sympathetic audience of expatriates in Dana Point to rejoice in an independent Iran. The highest-ranking Iranian official permitted to travel widely in the U.S. since the overthrow of the Shah more than two decades ago also urged the audience to speak out for the rights of Iranians everywhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With each succeeding lash to his back, the bound man sagged deeper, oblivious to the cries of "God is great!" from the crowd. They gathered to watch the slow, painful death of a soldier convicted by a clergy-run Iranian court. The charge: moral corruption. Two others were buried up to their chests and then stoned to death for the same crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2000
A nonprofit Iranian watchdog organization will hold a daylong symposium Saturday at Occidental College on reports of human rights abuses in the Middle Eastern country. The symposium, which is free and runs from 11:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. at Thorne Hall, will feature Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Huntington Beach), scholars and human rights activists. Five former political prisoners from Iran will also speak about their experiences.
NEWS
May 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two more Iranian Jews said Wednesday that they spied for Israel, bringing to three the number of defendants who have confessed to espionage in a trial that has attracted international concern. Defense lawyers for the 13 Jews on trial questioned the validity of the confessions and criticized the court, in which the judge also acts as prosecutor. Israel condemned the latest confessions as "loathsome." It denies that any of the defendants are spies.
NEWS
May 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two more Iranian Jews said Wednesday that they spied for Israel, bringing to three the number of defendants who have confessed to espionage in a trial that has attracted international concern. Defense lawyers for the 13 Jews on trial questioned the validity of the confessions and criticized the court, in which the judge also acts as prosecutor. Israel condemned the latest confessions as "loathsome." It denies that any of the defendants are spies.
NEWS
August 20, 1999 | From Associated Press
Iran urged the United States on Thursday to stop meddling in its domestic affairs, in response to State Department calls for the release of 13 Iranian Jews accused of spying. Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi said the U.S. statements go against "international norms and rules," Iran's official Islamic Republic News Agency, or IRNA, reported. "It is as though Iran asks the U.S. to release, before trial, all those who are arrested in the U.S.
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