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Human Rights Libya

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NEWS
June 14, 1988
Libya has banned housemaids, most divorces and the manufacture of nuclear weapons under a charter aimed at achieving world peace, the official Libyan news agency JANA said. The agency, in announcing a 27-point human rights document, said Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi plans to send envoys around the world to "destroy jails, free prisoners and abolish the death penalty, hard labor and life sentences."
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NEWS
August 31, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan on Friday proclaimed himself honored to accept a human rights award named for Libyan ruler Moammar Kadafi but turned down its accompanying $250,000 prize to avoid legal problems in the United States. Standing before emotional supporters who cried "Victory!" and "God is great!"
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NEWS
August 31, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan on Friday proclaimed himself honored to accept a human rights award named for Libyan ruler Moammar Kadafi but turned down its accompanying $250,000 prize to avoid legal problems in the United States. Standing before emotional supporters who cried "Victory!" and "God is great!"
NEWS
June 14, 1988
Libya has banned housemaids, most divorces and the manufacture of nuclear weapons under a charter aimed at achieving world peace, the official Libyan news agency JANA said. The agency, in announcing a 27-point human rights document, said Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi plans to send envoys around the world to "destroy jails, free prisoners and abolish the death penalty, hard labor and life sentences."
WORLD
February 20, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Haley Sweetland Edwards, Los Angeles Times
Two of the Arab world's most ruthless leaders have moved to crush revolts threatening their power in Libya and Yemen as security forces and thugs intensified attacks on dissidents and protesters dug scores of fresh graves amid the rattle of gunfire. The unrest convulsing the region has swept through the two police states, where deaths have climbed past 100 and demonstrators have grown fearless against tear gas and bullets. But even if the scenario is similar to the narrative played out in the overthrow of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, it is far from certain whether demonstrations can dislodge Libyan President Moammar Kadafi and Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh.
WORLD
July 7, 2012 | By Glen Johnson, Los Angeles Times
TRIPOLI, Libya - Libyans vote for a national assembly Saturday amid sharpening ethnic and tribal tension threatening the nation's transition from Moammar Kadafi's repressive rule to the newest democracy to emerge from the Arab Spring. This North African country, rich in oil and scarred by Kadafi's legacy, is at once a cause for hope and a dangerous tinderbox. Heavily armed militias hold sway in many towns. Talk of secession echoes through the east. Islamists are angling for a political voice and tribal leaders from the Sahara desert to the Mediterranean coast have only a cursory notion of how to build a civil state.
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