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Human Rights Nicaragua

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NEWS
February 10, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The U.S.-funded Nicaraguan rebels are guilty of systematic violations of the laws of war, including indiscriminate attacks against civilians, assassination of suspected opponents and widespread kidnaping, a human rights organization charged Monday. The group, Americas Watch, also accused Nicaragua's Sandinista government of human rights abuses but said that the regime does not regularly violate the laws of war as the contras do.
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NEWS
November 10, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young police officer slowly read aloud the dozen names etched on a stone tomb marking their common grave. "There are cemeteries like this all over Pantasmas, where state security killed hundreds of peasants and dumped their bodies," he said angrily. He spoke softly, changing the subject any time a passerby wandered along the rutted, muddy road past the graveyard.
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NEWS
June 27, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Shoemaker Rufo Hernandez left his wife and two daughters to serve in the Sandinista military reserves in January, 1985, expecting to be home within a few months. Instead, within a few weeks he was captured by anti-Sandinista rebels at an outpost in northern Nicaragua. He has spent the last two years in a rebel jail. "I have a son I haven't even seen yet," Hernandez said in an interview recently.
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean Paul Genie had no future in the old Nicaragua. Some of his friends had gone to battle and come home crippled. Others had fled to avoid conscription. His parents, fearful for their only child as he neared draft age, made plans to abandon the country. Then last February, Violeta Barrios de Chamorro was elected president, ending a decade of Sandinista rule. She abolished military conscription and settled the Contra war. Exiles came back.
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean Paul Genie had no future in the old Nicaragua. Some of his friends had gone to battle and come home crippled. Others had fled to avoid conscription. His parents, fearful for their only child as he neared draft age, made plans to abandon the country. Then last February, Violeta Barrios de Chamorro was elected president, ending a decade of Sandinista rule. She abolished military conscription and settled the Contra war. Exiles came back.
NEWS
February 28, 1989
Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, moving quickly to comply with a Central American peace accord, has sent the National Assembly a list of 1,932 political prisoners he wants pardoned. The prisoners are all former members of the National Guard of dictator Anastasio Somoza, whom the ruling Sandinistas helped overthrow in 1979. Ortega promised to free them as part of the peace pact, signed Feb. 14.
NEWS
August 15, 1987 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
A group of Presbyterians urged President Reagan, in a White House meeting this week, to support the preliminary peace accord recently signed by the presidents of the five Central American nations and to talk directly with any leader of the region, particularly President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua. "We felt that in dialogue, there is more chance for understanding and reconciliation," said the Rev. Donn Moomaw, senior pastor of Bel Air Presbyterian Church.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
High-ranking contra commanders have been blocking the work of a human rights office that was established by the U.S. Congress to monitor the Nicaraguan rebels as a condition for U.S. aid, according to human rights officials and other sources. The $100 million in aid is being given to the contras in this fiscal year. Marta Patricia Baltodano, director of the U.S.-funded Nicaraguan Assn.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | Associated Press
The Sandinista government Tuesday charged a jailed Illinois farmer with violating public order and security and accused him of having ties to U.S.-supported rebels. Government prosecutor Julio Cabrera delivered the papers to a court in Managua. Cabrera declined to read the charges. However, he told reporters of the charges and alleged that James Denby, 58, was linked to "the war of aggression" by the Contras. Conviction could carry a prison term of up to 30 years.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | Associated Press
Torture and other serious human rights violations by Nicaraguan authorities have led to the exodus of about 300,000 people--10% of the population--since the 1979 Sandinista revolution, according to a study released Tuesday. The report by the Puebla Institute, a lay Roman Catholic human rights organization, cited a variety of reasons for the exodus, including alleged restrictions on freedom of religion and Sandinista military attacks against civilians.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The day before he died, Martin Martinez, 17, told his mother the Sandinistas were after him. He would go into hiding, he promised, as soon as he brought in the bean crop. The youth's ordeal had begun when Contras seized him two years ago as an alleged Sandinista informer. He had escaped, only to be harassed by state security agents seeking hidden weapons and information about his brother, a Contra foot soldier. Last Nov. 22, months after the fighting subsided, the delicate balance of forces and fate that had allowed Martin to survive in this war zone collapsed.
NEWS
March 21, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
During nearly 10 years in a Sandinista prison for his service in the pre-revolutionary National Guard, Octavio Borgen had plenty of time to count. He said his jailers beat him 27 times. Thirty-five times, the former captain recalled, he was put in a dark punishment cell with no room to lie down. Five times he was taken from his cell in Modelo Prison to El Chipote, a notorious interrogation center. Once he endured three days of hostile questioning without sleep.
NEWS
February 28, 1989
Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, moving quickly to comply with a Central American peace accord, has sent the National Assembly a list of 1,932 political prisoners he wants pardoned. The prisoners are all former members of the National Guard of dictator Anastasio Somoza, whom the ruling Sandinistas helped overthrow in 1979. Ortega promised to free them as part of the peace pact, signed Feb. 14.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | United Press International
A human rights organization said Thursday that U.S.-backed Contras have released one of its American members who had been kidnaped and held for nine days. Spokesmen for Witness for Peace announced in Managua and Washington that Richard Boren, 30, of Elkin, N.C., was released unharmed Wednesday night in the village of Quilali, 145 miles north of the capital.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | Associated Press
The Sandinista government Tuesday charged a jailed Illinois farmer with violating public order and security and accused him of having ties to U.S.-supported rebels. Government prosecutor Julio Cabrera delivered the papers to a court in Managua. Cabrera declined to read the charges. However, he told reporters of the charges and alleged that James Denby, 58, was linked to "the war of aggression" by the Contras. Conviction could carry a prison term of up to 30 years.
NEWS
August 15, 1987 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
A group of Presbyterians urged President Reagan, in a White House meeting this week, to support the preliminary peace accord recently signed by the presidents of the five Central American nations and to talk directly with any leader of the region, particularly President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua. "We felt that in dialogue, there is more chance for understanding and reconciliation," said the Rev. Donn Moomaw, senior pastor of Bel Air Presbyterian Church.
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