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Human Rights Ordinance

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1988 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
When he first learned that Irvine was considering including homosexuals in an anti-discrimination ordinance, an alarmed Scott Peotter went to City Hall to get a copy. "It was the first time I'd ever been to the city clerk's office," Peotter said. He is becoming a frequent visitor now. Peotter is leading a group of Irvine residents, also novices at fighting City Hall, in a task worthy of an experienced civic gadfly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1991
I want to erase any misunderstanding of my testimony at the Irvine City Council on Dec. 11, 1990. I then protested the vicious newspaper delivered on Irvine streets targeting blacks, Jews, Hispanics, and the gay community with violent, Nazi hate. Something I said made Mayor Sally Anne Sheridan ask if I meant to suggest that member(s) of the City Council condoned that hate. Of course not. I referred to support by some council member(s) of Measure N, which removed the human rights guarantee to the gay community.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1989
I was reading the ballot arguments for and against Measure N in the Voter Information Pamphlet distributed by the Orange County registrar for Tuesday's ballot. I find a clear distinction in the way the arguments are presented. The city attorney's impartial summary says that "this initiative would delete any references to sexual orientation (in the city's Human Rights Ordinance)." The argument for Measure N says the issue is special protections for homosexuals, not discrimination, and proceeds to give examples of how that's true and reasons why the Human Rights Ordinance needs to be amended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1990 | JOE BEL BRUNO
Organizers of Irvine Citizens United, the group that lost its bid to keep the city's human rights ordinance intact in November's election, said that they will not disband and instead will continue to push for gay rights in future elections. After intense discussions over the future of the group, members voted overwhelmingly last week not to disband. The group said that its post-election agenda will include education packages, community symposiums and possibly seeking additional legislation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1989 | PAULA WERNER, Paula Werner is a member of the Irvine City Council and the advisory board of Irvine Citizens United Against Discrimination.
What's happening in Irvine? Apparently a host of accomplishments. Business leaders rank Irvine as No. 1. Irvine's schools are judged best in the county and nation, and UCI boasts prestigious scholars and growing research endowments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1989 | CHRISTINA L. SHEA, Christina L. Shea is on the Steering Committee of the Irvine Values Coalition Citizens for Equal Rights.
In July of 1988 the mayor and the Irvine City Council enacted a human rights ordinance that has imbedded within its structure a clause referring to "sexual orientation." This Human Rights Ordinance, because of the inclusion of this clause, gives special legislative protection to the homosexual, bisexual and lesbian communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many, the campaign claims are nothing short of shocking: Homosexuals have an exorbitant number of lovers. They want to have sex with children. They relentlessly push their beliefs on a straight society. Such claims are part of a barrage of campaign mailers and brochures put out by Irvine anti-gay rights activists seeking to remove gays from protection under the city's Human Rights Ordinance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1989
A few months ago, while trying to enter a supermarket, I was approached and asked to sign a petition that was represented as "a non-discriminating amendment to the city charter." Upon questioning the signature-gatherer as to exactly what this petition was, he replied that it would set aside a small part of the human rights ordinance. I kept asking, "What exactly are you trying to do?" He kept replying, "To deal with sexual orientation in the human rights ordinance." Being a newcomer to Irvine, I didn't know about the human rights ordinance, so I finally said, "What will be added to the H.R.O.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1989
It disturbs us that both proponents and opponents of Irvine's Measure N have chosen to play on the fears of the voters. Opponents say if you support Measure N, then you are a religious and political extremist and a gay and lesbian basher. Supporters say that if you oppose Measure N, then you advocate destruction of family and church and promote deviant sexual activity. Neither position is supported by the facts. Both positions are wrong morally and legally. Measure N is not a civil rights issue, it is a privacy issue.
NEWS
August 11, 1988
An anti-gay group has launched an initiative drive to remove from Irvine's new human rights ordinance any reference to homosexuals. The Irvine Values Coalition's initiative, submitted to the city clerk, would exclude homosexuals from protection against discrimination. If signatures of 10% of the Orange County city's 50,000 registered voters are collected, the measure could be voted on in 1989 or 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1989
Like others, I've wrestled with the pros and cons of Irvine's Measure N, the "sexual orientation" issue. On the surface, I wondered, "Why not?" Fair housing and employment seem so basic to America. Nagging questions caused me to reconsider the "sexual orientation" clause. Is it necessary? Is blatant discrimination taking place? To my surprise, the Irvine Human Rights Committee, in its yearlong study, found no discrimination taking place regarding sexual orientation. What can Irvine add to the Bill of Rights, Constitution, national and state laws?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many, the campaign claims are nothing short of shocking: Homosexuals have an exorbitant number of lovers. They want to have sex with children. They relentlessly push their beliefs on a straight society. Such claims are part of a barrage of campaign mailers and brochures put out by Irvine anti-gay rights activists seeking to remove gays from protection under the city's Human Rights Ordinance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1989
Last year Irvine enacted a human rights ordinance that protects, among others, gays and lesbians. It would be a terrible mistake if residents voted Nov. 7 to weaken that ordinance by deleting all references to sexual orientation. Voters in Irvine should reject Measure N, which is rooted in baseless fears and prejudice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1989
It disturbs us that both proponents and opponents of Irvine's Measure N have chosen to play on the fears of the voters. Opponents say if you support Measure N, then you are a religious and political extremist and a gay and lesbian basher. Supporters say that if you oppose Measure N, then you advocate destruction of family and church and promote deviant sexual activity. Neither position is supported by the facts. Both positions are wrong morally and legally. Measure N is not a civil rights issue, it is a privacy issue.
NEWS
October 27, 1989
Joseph N. Bell is to be congratulated for his investigative reporting in the Life section Oct. 14. As he points out, the disgraceful lies used by the so-called Traditional Values Coalition in the Yes argument on (Measure) N are disconcerting. Like most things done in Irvine, the Human Rights Ordinance was well thought out and debated before passage. It favors no one but only bars discrimination on account of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, sexual orientation, marital status and physical handicap.
NEWS
October 27, 1989
Joseph N. Bell is to be congratulated for his investigative reporting in the Life section Oct. 14. As he points out, the disgraceful lies used by the so-called Traditional Values Coalition in the Yes argument on (Measure) N are disconcerting. Like most things done in Irvine, the Human Rights Ordinance was well thought out and debated before passage. It favors no one but only bars discrimination on account of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, sexual orientation, marital status and physical handicap.
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