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Human Rights Pakistan

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NEWS
August 20, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After centuries of living like slaves, the serfs of southern Pakistan are finally rising up. Thousands of people locked by debt and chains to the country's biggest landlords are setting themselves free and demanding better lives. Laborers who for generations have been swapped and sold like animals are fleeing plantations, marching in the streets and attacking their owners with rocks and sticks.
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NEWS
September 13, 1999 | Times Wire Services
The U.N. human rights investigator Sunday harshly criticized Afghanistan's Taliban religious army for the widespread, systematic and officially sanctioned abuse of women. Accusing the Taliban's Ministry of Vice and Virtue of deep discrimination against women, Radhika Coomaraswamy, the U.N. special investigator into violence against women, called for international pressure to force its dissolution.
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NEWS
September 13, 1999 | Times Wire Services
The U.N. human rights investigator Sunday harshly criticized Afghanistan's Taliban religious army for the widespread, systematic and officially sanctioned abuse of women. Accusing the Taliban's Ministry of Vice and Virtue of deep discrimination against women, Radhika Coomaraswamy, the U.N. special investigator into violence against women, called for international pressure to force its dissolution.
NEWS
August 20, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After centuries of living like slaves, the serfs of southern Pakistan are finally rising up. Thousands of people locked by debt and chains to the country's biggest landlords are setting themselves free and demanding better lives. Laborers who for generations have been swapped and sold like animals are fleeing plantations, marching in the streets and attacking their owners with rocks and sticks.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | Reuters
The Pakistan government rejected U.S. charges of human rights abuses and called a State Department report an attempt to malign the people of Pakistan. Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto's government called the annual report on human rights "a classical example of disinformation." The report, released last week, said Pakistan police commonly torture people in custody. It also said that religious minorities face discrimination and that television and radio suppress news.
NEWS
August 4, 1989
More than 20 million children live in bonded slavery in South Asia, half of them in India, the Anti-Slavery Society said. "This system is perpetuated in India and also in Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka," society representative Kailish Satyarthi told a U.N. Human Rights Commission working group in Geneva.
WORLD
January 22, 2008 | From Reuters
Broadcasts by the private Geo television network resumed Monday in Pakistan more than 2 1/2 months after its transmission was blocked during a state of emergency. Geo News and its sister sports channel came back on the air hours after President Pervez Musharraf began a four-country trip to Europe, where he expected to face tough questions on media restrictions and human rights.
OPINION
January 16, 1994 | Jennifer Griffin, Jennifer Griffin, a contributor to the Asian Wall Street Journal and the London Observer, has written extensively on Asian affairs.
Their differences include a decade-old war atop a Himalayanglacier, accusations of cross-border terrorism and the specter of human-rights violations by the Indian army in what Pakistan has termed "occupied Kashmir." Neither side is without obstinate views on these issues. Indeed, neither side has softened its stance since partition and the end of British colonialism in 1947. Talks earlier this month between the two countries' foreign secretaries resulted in little progress.
WORLD
March 3, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Gunmen killed the only Christian member of Pakistan's Cabinet on Wednesday in Islamabad, the second assassination this year of a top official who had opposed the country's controversial blasphemy law and championed the rights of its beleaguered minorities. The slaying of Minority Affairs Minister Shahbaz Bhatti, 42, underscored the reach of extremism in Pakistan, a Muslim country founded on the principles of minority inclusion but increasingly unable to counter the influence of hard-line Islamist parties and clerics.
WORLD
October 11, 2002 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As workers counted millions of ballots Thursday, early unofficial results in the first general election since a 1999 coup suggested that allies of President Pervez Musharraf were locked in a tight race with the leading opposition party for control of parliament.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | Reuters
The Pakistan government rejected U.S. charges of human rights abuses and called a State Department report an attempt to malign the people of Pakistan. Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto's government called the annual report on human rights "a classical example of disinformation." The report, released last week, said Pakistan police commonly torture people in custody. It also said that religious minorities face discrimination and that television and radio suppress news.
NEWS
August 4, 1989
More than 20 million children live in bonded slavery in South Asia, half of them in India, the Anti-Slavery Society said. "This system is perpetuated in India and also in Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka," society representative Kailish Satyarthi told a U.N. Human Rights Commission working group in Geneva.
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