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Human Rights Panama

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NEWS
December 7, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Panama's military strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, is shoring up his rule with menacing and arbitrary actions that are radically--perhaps permanently--changing the country's political landscape. The steady move here--from what Latin Americans call a soft dictatorship to a hard one--has driven opponents of the military underground, into exile or into sullen silence.
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NEWS
December 29, 1989 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They swept streets, cashed checks, scanned the morning papers, swapped stories over huevos y cafe with the boys and even resumed running red lights and driving with the characteristic discipline of a pinball bounding back and forth between bumpers. With a resilience that surprised even themselves, Panamanians were getting back to the business of being Panamanians on Thursday--not prisoners in their own homes, fearing looters or battling troops.
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NEWS
September 21, 1989
The European Community agreed to suspend high-level contacts with Panama as part of a package of measures against that country's government. The 12 governments that make up the group said in a joint statement, issued in Brussels, that they seek "the re-establishment of institutional legitimacy and democracy in Panama to be achieved through a genuinely free and guaranteed electoral process."
NEWS
September 21, 1989
The European Community agreed to suspend high-level contacts with Panama as part of a package of measures against that country's government. The 12 governments that make up the group said in a joint statement, issued in Brussels, that they seek "the re-establishment of institutional legitimacy and democracy in Panama to be achieved through a genuinely free and guaranteed electoral process."
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz publicly endorsed Panama's main opposition movement Thursday and said that the Reagan Administration has decided to continue its freeze on aid to the regime of military strongman Manuel A. Noriega. "There are real problems in Panama," Shultz told a news conference. "We want to see in Panama--as elsewhere--an emergence of civilian, democratic control. . . . We see the efforts of the people in the Civic Crusade as making these points."
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They swept streets, cashed checks, scanned the morning papers, swapped stories over huevos y cafe with the boys and even resumed running red lights and driving with the characteristic discipline of a pinball bounding back and forth between bumpers. With a resilience that surprised even themselves, Panamanians were getting back to the business of being Panamanians on Thursday--not prisoners in their own homes, fearing looters or battling troops.
NEWS
May 8, 1988
A Panamanian dissident said he was forced to board a plane to Miami after being arrested and beaten. Ivan Romero, secretary general of the Christian Democratic Party, was detained in Panama after visiting the United States, said Perry Rivkind, local director of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. "They apparently interpreted something he said in New York as unflattering to Gen. (Manuel A. ) Noriega," Rivkind said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1996
The initial wave of pardons came from Panama's president himself in 1994. Right after his inauguration, Ernesto Perez Balladares granted amnesty to 222 onetime cronies of Manuel Antonio Noriega, Panama's former dictator. Then quietly, almost surreptitiously, Vice President Tomas Altamirano Duque granted 130 pardons for other Noriega loyalists.
WORLD
November 8, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Panama won a two-year term on the Security Council on Tuesday, making the powerful body's composition for 2007 much less contrarian than the U.S. had feared should Venezuela have won the Latin American seat. But the new council still will include voices that could challenge the United States, such as South Africa, a leader of developing nations. Panama emerged last week as the compromise candidate to fill the regional seat, ending a protracted standoff between U.S.
WORLD
July 13, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Her name is Milagro, or it was before her mother's heart broke into a million bits. The girl was 4, dark-toned and skinny. On the day soldiers took her away, she wore a violet dress with short sleeves and tiny pleats. She had no shoes. "They took my girl and said, 'Go, old lady!'" recalled her mother, Enma Orellana. The woman ran in fear, looking back just once, when the girl cried, "Mama!" That was 29 years ago, when El Salvador waged war with itself and left hurts that have never healed.
NEWS
May 8, 1988
A Panamanian dissident said he was forced to board a plane to Miami after being arrested and beaten. Ivan Romero, secretary general of the Christian Democratic Party, was detained in Panama after visiting the United States, said Perry Rivkind, local director of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. "They apparently interpreted something he said in New York as unflattering to Gen. (Manuel A. ) Noriega," Rivkind said.
NEWS
December 7, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Panama's military strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, is shoring up his rule with menacing and arbitrary actions that are radically--perhaps permanently--changing the country's political landscape. The steady move here--from what Latin Americans call a soft dictatorship to a hard one--has driven opponents of the military underground, into exile or into sullen silence.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz publicly endorsed Panama's main opposition movement Thursday and said that the Reagan Administration has decided to continue its freeze on aid to the regime of military strongman Manuel A. Noriega. "There are real problems in Panama," Shultz told a news conference. "We want to see in Panama--as elsewhere--an emergence of civilian, democratic control. . . . We see the efforts of the people in the Civic Crusade as making these points."
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