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Human Rights Philippines

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge ordered a freeze Monday on several Swiss bank accounts that may contain nearly $13 billion hidden in trust for the widow and children of the late Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos, according to testimony at a court hearing presented by a lawyer for Philippine human rights victims. U.S. District Judge Manuel L.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Merrill Lynch agreed Monday to turn over to a U.S. court more than $35.3 million being sought by Filipino citizens who won a human rights lawsuit against their late President Ferdinand E. Marcos. Plaintiffs' attorney Robert A. Swift said after a closed-door meeting in the chambers of U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real that the brokerage house had agreed to let Real decide who is entitled to the money.
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NEWS
February 25, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The 13-year legal battle to secure compensation for human rights victims of former Philippine dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos appears to have finally concluded, with the announcement Wednesday of a $150-million settlement. The announcement represents the culmination of years of on-and-off negotiations, complicated by the fractious nature of Philippine politics and the fact that Marcos' money was tied up in Swiss bank accounts with contested ownership.
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tentative federal court settlement that would provide $150 million in compensation for human rights victims of former Philippine dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos showed signs of unraveling Monday, as the plaintiffs' lawyer sought in vain to strike a paragraph from the agreement. An angry U.S. District Judge Manuel Real refused to alter the settlement's language, warning attorney Robert A. Swift that he could "wind up with zero" for his 9,539 Filipino clients.
NEWS
November 27, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In an attempt to avoid a frontal assault on the secrecy of their operations, two large Swiss banks will hold a high-powered bargaining session in Hong Kong that could generate significant payments to 10,000 Filipinos, The Times has learned. The Filipinos are trying to collect on a $1.9-billion judgment against the estate of late Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos, stemming from a massive human rights case.
NEWS
December 8, 1988
Nearly 12,000 people have been arrested in the Philippines, most of them illegally, since President Corazon Aquino came to power in February, 1986, a church-backed human rights group said. Task Force Detainees said at a press conference in Manila that most of the arrests were made during raids on slum districts in search of Communist rebels and that 659 remained in prison as of Nov. 21.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Two banks have won a small victory in the battle over an estimated $450 million belonging to the late Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos. A U.S. federal appellate judge has issued a temporary stay blocking the transfer of millions of dollars from Marcos' Swiss bank accounts to pay damages to 10,000 victims of human rights violations. The order from Judge Stephen Trott of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco was dated Dec. 22. It will remain in effect at least until Jan.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | Associated Press
More than 9,000 victims of torture under the regime of the late Philippine dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos were awarded $766 million Wednesday by a U.S. District Court jury. Now lawyers for the 9,070 plaintiffs in the class-action suit must begin the daunting task of trying to collect the money from the Marcos estate over opposition from the current Philippine government.
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tentative federal court settlement that would provide $150 million in compensation for human rights victims of former Philippine dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos showed signs of unraveling Monday, as the plaintiffs' lawyer sought in vain to strike a paragraph from the agreement. An angry U.S. District Judge Manuel Real refused to alter the settlement's language, warning attorney Robert A. Swift that he could "wind up with zero" for his 9,539 Filipino clients.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
A half-dozen bodyguards surrounded the hospital room where university president Nemesio Prudente was recovering Monday from the second attempt on his life in six months. As an added precaution, the patient's nameplate outside his private room at suburban Makati Medical Center simply said, "Occupied." At all times, heavy curtains inside Prudente's room remained closed. Such security was not the result of paranoia.
NEWS
February 25, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The 13-year legal battle to secure compensation for human rights victims of former Philippine dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos appears to have finally concluded, with the announcement Wednesday of a $150-million settlement. The announcement represents the culmination of years of on-and-off negotiations, complicated by the fractious nature of Philippine politics and the fact that Marcos' money was tied up in Swiss bank accounts with contested ownership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge ordered a freeze Monday on several Swiss bank accounts that may contain nearly $13 billion hidden in trust for the widow and children of the late Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos, according to testimony at a court hearing presented by a lawyer for Philippine human rights victims. U.S. District Judge Manuel L.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Two banks have won a small victory in the battle over an estimated $450 million belonging to the late Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos. A U.S. federal appellate judge has issued a temporary stay blocking the transfer of millions of dollars from Marcos' Swiss bank accounts to pay damages to 10,000 victims of human rights violations. The order from Judge Stephen Trott of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco was dated Dec. 22. It will remain in effect at least until Jan.
NEWS
December 9, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal judge said Friday that he will order two Swiss banks to turn over to court custody hundreds of millions of dollars from former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos' estate to partially satisfy a $1.9-billion verdict won by 9,400 victims of human rights abuse. U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real in Los Angeles did not issue a formal order but told attorneys for the banks and the victims that he plans to do so soon.
NEWS
November 27, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In an attempt to avoid a frontal assault on the secrecy of their operations, two large Swiss banks will hold a high-powered bargaining session in Hong Kong that could generate significant payments to 10,000 Filipinos, The Times has learned. The Filipinos are trying to collect on a $1.9-billion judgment against the estate of late Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos, stemming from a massive human rights case.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | Associated Press
More than 9,000 victims of torture under the regime of the late Philippine dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos were awarded $766 million Wednesday by a U.S. District Court jury. Now lawyers for the 9,070 plaintiffs in the class-action suit must begin the daunting task of trying to collect the money from the Marcos estate over opposition from the current Philippine government.
NEWS
November 4, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Rogelio Cinco and his wife were so afraid of the right-wing vigilantes in their home province of Leyte that they borrowed money from their parents, bundled up their five children and fled to what they hoped would be a safe haven in Manila. That was six weeks ago. Now Cinco's wife, Hermelihinda, says the family has learned that "we can run, but there is nowhere left to hide--the fear is everywhere now."
NEWS
December 9, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal judge said Friday that he will order two Swiss banks to turn over to court custody hundreds of millions of dollars from former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos' estate to partially satisfy a $1.9-billion verdict won by 9,400 victims of human rights abuse. U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real in Los Angeles did not issue a formal order but told attorneys for the banks and the victims that he plans to do so soon.
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
A federal court jury Thursday found the estate of the late Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos liable for torture and other atrocities committed against political opponents during his rule. It was the first class-action civil lawsuit in the United States claiming human rights violations in a foreign country. A separate trial will be held on how much the estate must pay the plaintiffs.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soldiers had bullied her before, so Ruby Sioco wasn't especially scared when three heavily armed members of the local militia stopped and roughly searched her in this hamlet of bamboo huts one recent morning. Nor did she worry when the leader, a man known as The Cat, ordered his men to hold her until he found her companions, three members of a leftist union's cultural group, farther down the dirt trail. They were campaigning for a human rights rally, she explained.
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