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Human Rights Saudi Arabia

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NEWS
May 14, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dramatic increase in executions in Saudi Arabia this year has alarmed human rights groups and refocused international attention on the kingdom's controversial judicial system. Estimates by human rights groups that closely monitor events there place the total between 90 and 100 through May 2. London-based Amnesty International said that figure exceeds the 53 executions known to have been carried out in 1994 and the 88 recorded in 1993, which also prompted complaints by human rights advocates.
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NEWS
March 28, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amnesty International accused the United States and the rest of the industrialized world today of ignoring human rights violations by Saudi Arabia because of the desert kingdom's massive economic power.
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NEWS
May 13, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The way Scott Nelson sees it, it was bad enough for Saudi Arabian police to beat him on the soles of his feet and break his knees while trying to get him to confess to charges they never even explained. But for the U.S. government to side with the torturers in court, that was too much. "When you come back to this country and your own government turns its back on you, the torture continues," said Nelson, a technician from Raleigh, N.C. Nelson is trying to sue the Saudi government for damages.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dramatic increase in executions in Saudi Arabia this year has alarmed human rights groups and refocused international attention on the kingdom's controversial judicial system. Estimates by human rights groups that closely monitor events there place the total between 90 and 100 through May 2. London-based Amnesty International said that figure exceeds the 53 executions known to have been carried out in 1994 and the 88 recorded in 1993, which also prompted complaints by human rights advocates.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amnesty International accused the United States and the rest of the industrialized world today of ignoring human rights violations by Saudi Arabia because of the desert kingdom's massive economic power.
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Finding human rights abuses in countries on both sides of the Persian Gulf conflict, the State Department on Friday accused Iraq of systematic repression of its own people and reported significant violations by the allied governments of Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Syria.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mahmoud Abdullah Kazem traveled to Mecca every year with his brother Ali, the high, sweet tones of his voice as he recited the Koran enchanting pilgrims during Islam's holy pilgrimage. A slight, quiet young medical student, Mahmoud, 20, was on his fifth hajj with his brother that day in July, 1989, when Ali disappeared. The next day, the police came for Mahmoud.
OPINION
July 18, 2007
Re "Iraq insurgency said to include many Saudis," July 15 The Times' piece is glaring proof that the Saudi ruling princes and their ostensible enemy, Osama bin Laden, have identical objectives in Iraq: no democracy, no majority rule, no women's or minority rights and, above all, very limited oil production, which could bring prices down and undermine the Saudi monopoly.
OPINION
January 27, 2009
Re "Israel and Gaza, now," editorial, Jan. 22 The Times is correct to call for Israel to recognize Hamas as the elected government of Palestine. The United States also must recognize the legitimacy of Hamas. Hamas' leaders have said they are open to a two-state solution based on the pre-1967 borders of Israel -- essentially, the Saudi peace initiative. To date, neither Israel nor the United States have accepted that initiative. It would be a good start to acknowledge Hamas as a legitimate participant in negotiations.
WORLD
April 4, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Alarmed by reports that Saudi Arabia will paralyze a man as punishment for allegedly stabbing a friend who ended up paralyzed, Britain urged the kingdom Thursday to abandon the “grotesque punishment.” The Saudi Gazette reported last week that Ali Khawahir was sentenced to be paralyzed if he could not pay 1 million riyals - roughly $270,000 - to the friend he allegedly stabbed a decade ago. Khawahir was reportedly 14 years old when he...
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The way Scott Nelson sees it, it was bad enough for Saudi Arabian police to beat him on the soles of his feet and break his knees while trying to get him to confess to charges they never even explained. But for the U.S. government to side with the torturers in court, that was too much. "When you come back to this country and your own government turns its back on you, the torture continues," said Nelson, a technician from Raleigh, N.C. Nelson is trying to sue the Saudi government for damages.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mahmoud Abdullah Kazem traveled to Mecca every year with his brother Ali, the high, sweet tones of his voice as he recited the Koran enchanting pilgrims during Islam's holy pilgrimage. A slight, quiet young medical student, Mahmoud, 20, was on his fifth hajj with his brother that day in July, 1989, when Ali disappeared. The next day, the police came for Mahmoud.
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Finding human rights abuses in countries on both sides of the Persian Gulf conflict, the State Department on Friday accused Iraq of systematic repression of its own people and reported significant violations by the allied governments of Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Syria.
OPINION
September 9, 2001 | JIM HOAGLAND
The United States has no peer in world affairs in understanding and responding to an urgent challenge painted in black and white. Painting challenges in shades of gray, however, disorients U.S. presidents and legislators as well as the public. Complex situations like the Balkans seem to confirm the Churchillian theory that Americans will always do the right thing after trying all other alternatives. This partly--but only partly--explains the difficulties successive U.S.
WORLD
March 29, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - The Saudi royal family prizes stability as much as the oil that secures its wealth, but political upheaval across the Middle East has shaken the kingdom's sense of balance, forcing it to press for radical change in Syria and confront a bid by longtime nemesis Iran to wield greater influence. The decades-old rivalry between Sunni Muslim Saudi Arabia and Shiite-controlled Iran for prominence in the region is one of the volatile subplots embedded in the "Arab Spring.
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