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Human Rights South Africa

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March 24, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High school student Mthetheleli Mncube sneaked out of South Africa in 1980, and, five years later, stole back into the country as a trained guerrilla of the outlawed African National Congress. His military unit planted land mines on the northern border, killing six farmers and a farm worker before Mncube was captured. He managed to escape, though, mortally wounding his two white police captors in the process.
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NEWS
February 24, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rights activists and opposition politicians here are up in arms over proposed legislation that would allow suspected terrorists to be detained and interrogated for 14 days without charge or trial. Government officials argue that the absence of specific anti-terrorism laws has made South Africa a haven for international terrorists and fugitives. The legislation also would provide for harsher sentences for people convicted of terrorism.
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NEWS
November 14, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A six-month-long judicial inquiry, investigating allegations that government death squads assassinated 71 political opponents, exonerated the police Tuesday but blamed a covert army unit for two murders. Justice Louis Harms, who led the government-appointed commission, recommended that the authorities consider charges against army operatives for the two 1986 murders in Pretoria's Mamelodi township, a 1989 bombing near Cape Town and plots to kill three political activists.
NEWS
November 20, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The history of this country is rife with human rights abuses. The secret horrors of the apartheid security apparatus continue to unfold in court hearings. Even hushed-up atrocities from the Boer War, fought a century ago, are now coming to light. Three years ago, the new black-majority government enacted a revamped constitution that guarantees far-reaching human rights protections. The intention was to declare: "Never again."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1989 | WILLIAM D.MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
In a major policy study ordered by Pope John Paul II, the Roman Catholic Church on Friday condemned racism as "a wound in humanity's side that mysteriously remains open." The 16,000-word document, prepared by the Pontifical Justice and Peace Commission, singles out South Africa as the worst example of institutionalized racism and suggests that the policy of strict racial separation there might be effectively combatted with international sanctions.
NEWS
June 3, 1989 | From Reuters
Four people, including a 22-year-old woman, were hanged in South Africa on Friday, provoking fresh calls from church and civil rights groups for an end to the death penalty. A Justice Ministry spokesman said that the four, all convicted murderers, were sent to the gallows inside Pretoria Central Prison at dawn. It was the first execution of a woman in more than two years in South Africa, which the London-based human rights organization Amnesty International says has the world's third-highest official execution rate after Iran and Iraq.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The final report of this country's truth commission, meant to clear the air about the nation's racist past, may instead resemble apartheid-era documents that were left with gaping holes by government censors. Back from the printers on Wednesday, the five-volume report is scheduled to be delivered today to President Nelson Mandela and made public.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of people from both sides of this country's racial divide scrambled Saturday to beat a midnight deadline to seek amnesty for political crimes and human rights abuses committed in the apartheid era. Among those who applied to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission were some of the government's most senior officials, including Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, several Cabinet ministers and at least 370 other members of the ruling African National Congress, officials said.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who won the 1984 Nobel Peace Prize for his impassioned leadership of the anti-apartheid struggle, was appointed Wednesday as chairman of South Africa's new panel to investigate past political crimes and human rights abuses.
NEWS
June 8, 1994 | CHRIS McGREAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An official commission will investigate state-sanctioned murders and the catalogue of other human rights abuses committed under apartheid, this nation's African National Congress-led government decided Tuesday. But eager to allay fears within South Africa's security forces of Nuremberg-style trials, officials also offered a new amnesty for politically motivated crimes to those who are prepared to confess before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
NEWS
October 31, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the Nobel laureate who heads this country's truth commission, is to board a plane this morning for a teaching job in Atlanta. Vice Chairman Alex Boraine is bound for New York. Commissioner Fazel Randera, a physician, is going back to private practice. "The Truth and Reconciliation Commission is now closed," Commissioner Dumisa Ntsebeza, a human rights attorney, said Friday. A beaming Tutu added: "We have done it. Now let us move on."
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a public damnation of the evils perpetrated under apartheid, South Africa's truth commission Thursday released its final report after the ruling African National Congress lost an eleventh-hour court battle to keep it under wraps. The milestone document lays blame for killings, beatings and torture on the former, white-minority regime, which it identifies as the No. 1 villain of the country's racist past.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The final report of this country's truth commission, meant to clear the air about the nation's racist past, may instead resemble apartheid-era documents that were left with gaping holes by government censors. Back from the printers on Wednesday, the five-volume report is scheduled to be delivered today to President Nelson Mandela and made public.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The former white-led government tried to develop bacteria that would kill, or make infertile, only black people, the scientist who set up the apartheid regime's secret poison factory said. Dr. Daan Goosen told the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, engaged in unraveling the grim secrets of the apartheid era, that a major focus at the secret laboratory had been the infertility project. "It was not thought to get rid of all the black people, just to curb the birth rate," he said.
NEWS
July 13, 1997 | JAMES F. SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As soon as the amnesty hearing for the murderers of Newport Beach's Amy Biehl ended last week, the committee began hearing its next case: a grenade attack on a church service that killed 11 worshipers. South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission is considering amnesty applications from more than 7,000 people in human rights violations committed from 1960 to 1994.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of people from both sides of this country's racial divide scrambled Saturday to beat a midnight deadline to seek amnesty for political crimes and human rights abuses committed in the apartheid era. Among those who applied to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission were some of the government's most senior officials, including Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, several Cabinet ministers and at least 370 other members of the ruling African National Congress, officials said.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Amnesty International accused the South African government of continuing to allow security forces to wage war on the African National Congress, even as it negotiates power-sharing with the black movement. A 100-page report by the London-based human rights group said the government has "failed to act against all but a tiny proportion of human rights violators within the police and military." A police spokesman rejected the Amnesty report as biased and incomplete.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A parliamentary advisory body on Wednesday recommended a constitution for South Africa that would extend voting rights to the black majority but protect the political rights of whites. President Frederik W. de Klerk's government has yet to put forth a formal constitutional proposal. The plan recommended Wednesday loosely resembles other blueprints under consideration.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic breakthrough, officials said Monday that five former security police officers are expected to seek amnesty in the 1977 beating death of celebrated black leader Steven Biko, the most notorious death in police custody of the apartheid era. Biko headed the Black Consciousness Movement and at the time was arguably South Africa's best-known political dissident. His death in detention prompted worldwide outrage and was instrumental in the imposition of U.N.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a youth, Simon Nkuli had two strikes against him under the white supremacist system of apartheid and the stern Calvinist morality that underpinned it: He was both black and homosexual. Thus he endured five years in various jails and prisons for his political activism before being acquitted of treason charges in 1988. And he was both tortured and mocked by police, who called him a moffie, a pejorative for gays.
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