Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHuman Rights Sri Lanka
IN THE NEWS

Human Rights Sri Lanka

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 22, 1987
Amnesty International called on Sri Lanka to investigate reports that hundreds of Tamils were tortured and that nearly 500 disappeared in the last 2 1/2 years after they were arrested by security forces. "We have strong reason to believe that many of the 'disappeared' have been tortured, some dying as a result, and that others have been sh1869881441disposed of in secret," the London-based group said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
September 27, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
UNITED NATIONS - From Moammar Kadafi's baffling fantasies to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's room-emptying rants, almost every confab of world leaders at the annual United Nations General Assembly includes speeches that make people squirm in their chairs. With the Libyan leader deposed and dead and the former Iranian president retired - and Sudan's Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir, charged with committing war crimes in the Darfur region, staying away - one of the most awkward moments this year came when the president of tiny Sri Lanka, Mahinda Rajapaksa, used his speech Tuesday to bash the U.N. itself.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Sri Lanka said it was unhappy with "highly colored language" in an Amnesty International report that accused the government of turning a blind eye to widespread human rights violations. "We take strong exception to some of the allegations in the report. We're very unhappy with the highly colored language in the report," a Foreign Ministry spokesman said. Amnesty said it was unacceptable for the government to try to justify human rights violations in the context of war.
NEWS
June 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
Wailing mothers and sobbing fathers filed past scraps of clothing and two human skeletons displayed on tables in a police station Friday to determine if the remains belonged to about 300 people who disappeared while in military custody. The skeletons--one blindfolded and bound--were exhumed Thursday at a site in northern Sri Lanka where a former soldier said he helped bury bodies in mass graves. The remains will be sent to experts for further examination. The skeletons were identified as R.S.
NEWS
June 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
Wailing mothers and sobbing fathers filed past scraps of clothing and two human skeletons displayed on tables in a police station Friday to determine if the remains belonged to about 300 people who disappeared while in military custody. The skeletons--one blindfolded and bound--were exhumed Thursday at a site in northern Sri Lanka where a former soldier said he helped bury bodies in mass graves. The remains will be sent to experts for further examination. The skeletons were identified as R.S.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old woman was shrieking and wailing and beating her head with her fists as she wildly circled the bloodied body of her son, a local grocer known only as Simon. "My God, can't you all see?" she screamed to the crowd of villagers who had gathered around. "He is still alive. He is still breathing. Can't you see it? My son is dying. Help him! Help him!" But the villagers who had known Simon all their lives just stared at the grisly scene, paralyzed with fear.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a yearlong reign of terror by government-backed death squads that emptied villages of young men and littered Sri Lanka's beaches with corpses, the fishermen of Moratuwa were hardly surprised when they spotted yet another body floating 250 yards offshore recently. But this time, it was different. When the fishermen got the body to shore, they knew that this was not just another anonymous suspect in the government's brutal counterinsurgency campaign.
WORLD
September 27, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
UNITED NATIONS - From Moammar Kadafi's baffling fantasies to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's room-emptying rants, almost every confab of world leaders at the annual United Nations General Assembly includes speeches that make people squirm in their chairs. With the Libyan leader deposed and dead and the former Iranian president retired - and Sudan's Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir, charged with committing war crimes in the Darfur region, staying away - one of the most awkward moments this year came when the president of tiny Sri Lanka, Mahinda Rajapaksa, used his speech Tuesday to bash the U.N. itself.
OPINION
March 9, 2012 | By Lionel Beehner
The U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay, recently depicted the conflict in Syria as "civil war. " Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton added that there was "every possibility" of civil war breaking out in Syria. Both of these portrayals of the conflict were meant to ratchet up pressure on the international community to prevent further violence. But in fact, describing a conflict as a civil war achieves exactly the opposite effect. It is not a call to arms; it is a call to inaction.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Sri Lanka said it was unhappy with "highly colored language" in an Amnesty International report that accused the government of turning a blind eye to widespread human rights violations. "We take strong exception to some of the allegations in the report. We're very unhappy with the highly colored language in the report," a Foreign Ministry spokesman said. Amnesty said it was unacceptable for the government to try to justify human rights violations in the context of war.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a yearlong reign of terror by government-backed death squads that emptied villages of young men and littered Sri Lanka's beaches with corpses, the fishermen of Moratuwa were hardly surprised when they spotted yet another body floating 250 yards offshore recently. But this time, it was different. When the fishermen got the body to shore, they knew that this was not just another anonymous suspect in the government's brutal counterinsurgency campaign.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old woman was shrieking and wailing and beating her head with her fists as she wildly circled the bloodied body of her son, a local grocer known only as Simon. "My God, can't you all see?" she screamed to the crowd of villagers who had gathered around. "He is still alive. He is still breathing. Can't you see it? My son is dying. Help him! Help him!" But the villagers who had known Simon all their lives just stared at the grisly scene, paralyzed with fear.
NEWS
October 6, 1989
At least 18 young Sinhalese were beheaded or shot to death and their bodies were dumped on a Sri Lankan university campus, residents and police said. The unidentified victims' naked bodies were found scattered around Peradeniya University near the town of Kandy, 70 miles east of Colombo, the capital. Residents said they believe the massacre was in retaliation for the killing by leftist rebels of a university official who was also a volunteer army captain.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|