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Human Rights Togo

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April 11, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The federal Board of Immigration Appeals will conduct a hearing next month into the case of Fauziya Kasinga, a young women from Togo who is seeking asylum in the United States on grounds she has been threatened with genital mutilation in her African nation. The hearing had been set for Wednesday. Karen Musalo of American University, who is representing Kasinga, has argued that the United Nations considers this tribal ritual a human rights violation.
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NEWS
April 30, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As her hearing before a high-level immigration board approaches, a young woman who fled her native Togo because of the threat of forced genital mutilation seems likely to gain sympathetic treatment in a plea for political asylum here. Fauziya Kasinga, 19, will present her case to the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals on Thursday. Her attorneys will ask the board to grant her the asylum refused last year by a lower court or at least remand her case for a fuller hearing before the same judge.
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NEWS
April 30, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As her hearing before a high-level immigration board approaches, a young woman who fled her native Togo because of the threat of forced genital mutilation seems likely to gain sympathetic treatment in a plea for political asylum here. Fauziya Kasinga, 19, will present her case to the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals on Thursday. Her attorneys will ask the board to grant her the asylum refused last year by a lower court or at least remand her case for a fuller hearing before the same judge.
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The federal Board of Immigration Appeals will conduct a hearing next month into the case of Fauziya Kasinga, a young women from Togo who is seeking asylum in the United States on grounds she has been threatened with genital mutilation in her African nation. The hearing had been set for Wednesday. Karen Musalo of American University, who is representing Kasinga, has argued that the United Nations considers this tribal ritual a human rights violation.
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