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NEWS
March 3, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A European anti-torture delegation visited the prison island where Kurdish rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan is being held. They are the first foreign officials to visit the heavily guarded Imrali island since he was jailed there. The team of 15 lawyers and doctors from the Council of Europe did not comment on the trip but is expected to prepare a report on Ocalan's condition. It was unclear whether the delegation met with Ocalan.
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NEWS
March 20, 2001 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Cabinet on Monday approved a detailed program of political, economic and legal reforms in Turkey aimed at securing the predominantly Muslim nation's long-cherished goal of joining the European Union. But the 1,000-page document, which requires the approval of parliament, lacks commitments that European leaders have insisted on as conditions for starting talks on Turkey's EU membership.
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NEWS
February 18, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after bringing Abdullah Ocalan home to face trial, Turkey on Wednesday sought to turn the capture of the Kurdish warlord into a demoralizing rout of his cause, sending troops against his insurgents' strongholds in northern Iraq and airing a videotape of the macho orator looking ill, dispirited and barely able to speak.
NEWS
January 7, 2001 | From Reuters
Turkish prisoners transferred to new small-cell jails were tortured and kept in isolation for long periods, a human rights group said Saturday. Turkey denied the charges. Amnesty International made its accusation just weeks after Turkish security forces launched a crackdown on jails across the country to try to end hunger strikes by prisoners protesting plans to transfer them from large dormitories to small cells. At least 30 prisoners and two police officers died in the raids.
NEWS
January 7, 2001 | From Reuters
Turkish prisoners transferred to new small-cell jails were tortured and kept in isolation for long periods, a human rights group said Saturday. Turkey denied the charges. Amnesty International made its accusation just weeks after Turkish security forces launched a crackdown on jails across the country to try to end hunger strikes by prisoners protesting plans to transfer them from large dormitories to small cells. At least 30 prisoners and two police officers died in the raids.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Turkish court sentenced eight elected ethnic Kurdish leaders to between 3 1/2 and 15 years in prison Thursday, ignoring concerns expressed in the United States and the West that they were being jailed merely for expressing their views on Kurdish rights. The military-dominated state security court in the capital, Ankara, accepted secret wiretaps and speeches to find six of the defendants guilty of working for the rebel guerrillas of the banned Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Police arrested two leading Kurdish members of Parliament on Wednesday, in a move that added to Turkey's growing atmosphere of political and economic crisis, escalating nationalist sentiment and diminishing respect for human rights. Security forces took Hatip Dicle and Orhan Dogan into custody after right-wing parties in Parliament voted to lift the immunity from prosecution of several lawmakers who belong to Turkey's only legal Kurdish nationalist group, the Democracy Party.
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The government has approved legislation that would allow public use of the Kurdish language in conversation and songs for the first time in eight years, officials in Ankara, Turkey, announced. A government spokesman told reporters after a late-night Cabinet session that the legislation, lifting a ban on all use of Kurdish imposed by the military in 1983, would be sent to the Parliament in the coming days.
NEWS
February 22, 1991
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL accused members of the anti-Iraq alliance of using war as a pretext for human rights violations. The single U.S. case cited by the London-based organization was the imprisonment of a soldier who refused to help prepare military supplies for shipment to Saudi Arabia on moral and religious grounds.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
Kurdish demonstrators stormed the Turkish Embassy in London's exclusive Belgrave Square on Friday, causing extensive damage before surrendering to heavily armed police. No injuries were reported. In Deventer, the Netherlands, about 50 protesters rioted after trying to enter the Turkish consulate. Two protesters were hospitalized and six police officers suffered minor injuries in the hourlong clash, a police spokesman said.
NEWS
March 3, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A European anti-torture delegation visited the prison island where Kurdish rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan is being held. They are the first foreign officials to visit the heavily guarded Imrali island since he was jailed there. The team of 15 lawyers and doctors from the Council of Europe did not comment on the trip but is expected to prepare a report on Ocalan's condition. It was unclear whether the delegation met with Ocalan.
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after bringing Abdullah Ocalan home to face trial, Turkey on Wednesday sought to turn the capture of the Kurdish warlord into a demoralizing rout of his cause, sending troops against his insurgents' strongholds in northern Iraq and airing a videotape of the macho orator looking ill, dispirited and barely able to speak.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two unidentified gunmen seriously wounded this nation's most prominent human rights campaigner in his office here Tuesday, provoking a storm of protest against the Turkish government for failing to protect him. Akin Birdal, 50, president of the Human Rights Assn. and a critic of the government's bloody crackdown on Kurdish separatists, was listed in critical condition with six bullet wounds--including three in the chest--from 9-millimeter automatic pistols.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About two weeks ago, police stopped Cetin Paydar on his way to work at a coffeehouse in this village in western Turkey. They had a complaint from a relative that the 40-year-old waiter had killed his own father. A short, thin man with listless eyes, Paydar shook as he recalled what happened next: "The police hit me nonstop during the ride to the station. They kept demanding that I confess," he said. "I kept telling them I had done nothing of the kind and that I had no idea where [my father] was.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1997
I was annoyed by John Tirman's article (Commentary, Dec. 19), which I found offensive, misrepresentative and unprofessional. The facts are quite to the contrary. There is not even one country in this world which is free of human rights violations. Every country and every society share this problem in differing forms. Turkey is neither the best nor the worst. Turkey is a democracy just like the U.S. The difference with respect to human rights lies in national income and public priorities to spend it. As governments respond to public demands with limited resources, it is usually investments in the justice system, law enforcement and education that suffer.
NEWS
October 2, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Amnesty International launched a worldwide campaign to highlight human rights abuses in Turkey and issued a report condemning extrajudicial killings, torture and disappearances. Amnesty chief Pierre Sane said the London-based human rights group would pressure international organizations in a bid to expose rights abuses by the Turkish government and by the Kurdistan Workers Party rebels and other guerrilla groups.
NEWS
August 7, 1989
Kurdish demonstrators occupied the Eiffel Tower for more than two hours to protest Turkey's alleged mistreatment of Kurds. Police said that about 200 Kurds gathered at the foot of the central Paris landmark while 100 others climbed a quarter of the way up the 984-foot tower and unfurled three red and yellow banners reading: "End the Massacre and the Deportation of Kurdistan." Scuffles broke out around the base of the tower when about 40 police pushed back a group of more than 50 demonstrators.
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Amnesty International said Tuesday it has received reports nearly every day of widespread torture in Turkey, where authorities allegedly regularly force confessions out of men, women and children through beatings, sexual abuse, electric shocks and even crucifixion. The 73-page report by the London-based organization, which monitors human rights violations around the world, was one of the most scathing documents Amnesty International has published on a single nation in recent years.
NEWS
October 27, 1995 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This nation's Supreme Court ordered the release of two jailed Kurdish members of Parliament on Thursday as the government emerged from five weeks of crisis and began to enact human rights reforms sought by Europe in return for a landmark trade pact. "It's a good, if limited, sign," said Alexander Borges, spokesman for the European Commission in Turkey. "The position of the commission is that . . . this is the best way to help democracy in Turkey."
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Turkish court sentenced eight elected ethnic Kurdish leaders to between 3 1/2 and 15 years in prison Thursday, ignoring concerns expressed in the United States and the West that they were being jailed merely for expressing their views on Kurdish rights. The military-dominated state security court in the capital, Ankara, accepted secret wiretaps and speeches to find six of the defendants guilty of working for the rebel guerrillas of the banned Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK.
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