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September 4, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dank tunnels beneath the KGB headquarters lie the moldering documents, perhaps ruined by seepage or soiled by rat droppings, that could explain to Vladimir Yanin why he was arrested at 16 as "the son of an enemy of the people" and why his stepfather was shot. At least, that is what Yanin dares to hope, now that the KGB files on the millions who fell victim to Josef Stalin's brutal dictatorship are about to be opened.
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NEWS
April 25, 1992 | From Reuters
The 3.7-million-member former Soviet armed forces were condemned Friday as a breeding ground for bullies who killed tens of thousands of recruits. One of the world's biggest military powers was a leader in brutality to draftees, said Anatoly Alekseyev, head of a Russian presidential panel on troops and their families. The armed forces lost far more young recruits in barracks violence and torture than they did in combat against Afghan guerrillas, he said.
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NEWS
November 5, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Human rights activist Andrei D. Sakharov was quoted in a Soviet publication Wednesday as saying that "the whole terrible truth" about the Stalin era has not yet been told. Sakharov, a physicist who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1975, was interviewed by the Moscow News before Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev spoke out against Stalin on Monday in a speech on the 70th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | Associated Press
Ten political prisoners were freed Friday from the notorious labor camp known as Perm 35, news reports said, as Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin sought to shut down the vestiges of the Soviet gulag. A week ago, Yeltsin had described the 10 as the last prisoners of conscience in Russia. Human rights activists, however, say there are still more than 100 people jailed for refusing army service.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
President Bush, in a message of condolence, praised Andrei D. Sakharov's courage and devotion to freedom Friday and said the Nobel Peace Prize winner was an example of goodness and decency. "All of us who knew him will never forget his courage and devotion to freedom. During the darkest hours of his struggle for human rights in the Soviet Union he embodied all that is good and decent in the human spirit," Bush said in a message to Sakharov's widow, Yelena Bonner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1989 | WILLIAM D.MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
In a major policy study ordered by Pope John Paul II, the Roman Catholic Church on Friday condemned racism as "a wound in humanity's side that mysteriously remains open." The 16,000-word document, prepared by the Pontifical Justice and Peace Commission, singles out South Africa as the worst example of institutionalized racism and suggests that the policy of strict racial separation there might be effectively combatted with international sanctions.
NEWS
October 31, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan announced Friday that he and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev will meet in Washington starting Dec. 7 for summit talks that the President said could turn the anniversary of the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor into a day remembered as the beginning of superpower peace. Standing between Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Georgian president bowed his head to enter St. Nino Church, lit seven slender candles and prayed for his nation's victory in its battle to free itself from the Kremlin. It was Palm Sunday and Zviad Gamsakhurdia, a former political prisoner who is now the president, was asking for God's help as the people of Georgia went to the polls that day to vote on the mountainous republic's independence from the Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | DAVID VOREACOS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union is violating international law by denying emigration to thousands of citizens on the grounds that they possess "state secrets," a Jewish organization said Tuesday in a report prepared for Secretary of State George P. Shultz. "The Soviet Union is alone among major developed states in routinely concluding that ordinary citizens possess 'state secrets' so as to justify preventing their leaving the country," said the report, released by the National Conference on Soviet Jewry.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
Over the past 10 years, conditions in Soviet prisons have improved while those in the United States have gotten worse, the U.S. Helsinki Watch Committee said Thursday after lengthy surveys of superpower jails. Both countries still have the highest incarceration rates among major nations of the world, with 1 million people each behind bars, Helsinki Watch said in reports published to coincide with a 38-nation human rights conference being held in Moscow.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | Here's what happened Tuesday in the Soviet Union:
NEW CONSTITUTION: The Russian Federation drafted a new constitution that proposes a Western-style balance of executive, legislative and judicial powers. It would also resurrect the Duma, Russia's first national Parliament, which functioned between 1905 and the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. SOLZHENITSYN CLEARED: Chief Soviet prosecutor Nikolai Trubin officially closed the 1974 treason case against writer Alexander I.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
Over the past 10 years, conditions in Soviet prisons have improved while those in the United States have gotten worse, the U.S. Helsinki Watch Committee said Thursday after lengthy surveys of superpower jails. Both countries still have the highest incarceration rates among major nations of the world, with 1 million people each behind bars, Helsinki Watch said in reports published to coincide with a 38-nation human rights conference being held in Moscow.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | Associated Press
With the breakup of central control in the Soviet Union, human rights monitors need to shift their focus to conditions in the republics, Soviet rights activist Yelena Bonner said Tuesday. Bonner, widow of Nobel Peace Prize winner Andrei Sakharov, said the erosion of strong central control will require the immediate formation of groups to monitor human rights across the union. She made her request to the Conference of Security and Cooperation in Europe. Bonner also complained about Mikhail S.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior representatives from 38 nations, applauding Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's renewed commitment to human rights, Tuesday declared the dawn of a new European era in which such basic rights are suddenly no longer a dream but have won the support of all the Continent's nations.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign ministers from Europe, Canada and the United States gather here today to launch a major human rights conference in the after-glow of democracy's recent triumphs in the Soviet Union but amid growing concern about what the dizzying changes may have brought. The crumbling of authoritarian power following last month's abortive coup against President Mikhail S.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | Reuters
A European human rights conference scheduled to begin Sept. 10 in Moscow will go ahead despite the recent upheavals, Foreign Minister Boris N. Pankin told Soviet television Tuesday. The meeting of officials from the 35 countries in the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe is seen as giving the West's seal of approval to the Soviet Union's higher regard for human rights under President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. For decades, the Soviet Union has been accused of rights violations.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | Reuters
A European human rights conference scheduled to begin Sept. 10 in Moscow will go ahead despite the recent upheavals, Foreign Minister Boris N. Pankin told Soviet television Tuesday. The meeting of officials from the 35 countries in the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe is seen as giving the West's seal of approval to the Soviet Union's higher regard for human rights under President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. For decades, the Soviet Union has been accused of rights violations.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A Soviet human rights commission appealed to the government Tuesday to free the country's remaining religious prisoners in a demonstration of its declared commitment to democracy and civil liberties.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dank tunnels beneath the KGB headquarters lie the moldering documents, perhaps ruined by seepage or soiled by rat droppings, that could explain to Vladimir Yanin why he was arrested at 16 as "the son of an enemy of the people" and why his stepfather was shot. At least, that is what Yanin dares to hope, now that the KGB files on the millions who fell victim to Josef Stalin's brutal dictatorship are about to be opened.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Kabakov, a decorated World War II veteran who has found himself barred from traveling outside the Soviet Union because he had access to military secrets 17 years ago, expects no help from President Bush on this summit visit. Neither does Valeria Novodvorskaya, the outspoken leader of a radical group who has been held in Moscow's Lefortovo Prison since mid-May on charges of subversion. Nor does Yelena Bonner, the widow and comrade-in-arms of Nobel laureate Andrei D. Sakharov.
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