Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHuman Rights Ussr
IN THE NEWS

Human Rights Ussr

NEWS
January 16, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, paying a rare tribute to human rights progress in the Soviet Union, on Sunday called on Moscow to dismantle the powerful transmitters that were used to jam foreign radio broadcasts and to take other steps to guarantee that there will be no backsliding.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The 35-nation Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe, which has been meeting in Vienna for more than two years, is on the verge of an overall agreement, diplomatic sources said Wednesday. The final breakthrough was the result of the United States agreeing to a Soviet proposal that a human rights conference be held in Moscow in 1991, on condition that the Soviets continue to improve their record on human rights, the diplomats said.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Supreme Soviet publicly restored the rights of national minorities deported from their homelands under dictator Josef Stalin. But the national Parliament stopped short of granting them compensation or allowing them all to return. Lawmakers approved a declaration acknowledging that the rights of hundreds of thousands of Volga Germans, Crimean Tatars and other minorities had been violated and should be restored in full.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union's attitude toward human rights has improved dramatically, and most political prisoners have been freed, although abuses persist and the picture is "deeply confusing," Amnesty International says. In a report published today, the worldwide human rights movement says its list of Soviet citizens imprisoned for nonviolent exercise of their human rights shrank from 600 three years ago to about 90 in July, and would have been lower but for further arrests.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Communist Party on Saturday proposed reforms that would transform the country's highly centralized political and economic system into one based on federalism with extensive freedoms for its constituent republics and regions. A crucial element in the broad reforms now under way here, the move will reshape the Soviet Union, according to the party's policy document on ethnic issues, and it calls for extensive negotiations to reach a new constitutional formula for the country.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of the National Conference on Soviet Jewry said Tuesday that they had not expected to live long enough to hear an official of the Soviet Foreign Ministry plead for patience and understanding of Moscow's developing emigration policy. But an official of the Soviet ministry--which a few years ago would speak the conference's name only through clenched teeth--did just that in an address to the group's annual assembly. Yuri A.
NEWS
August 1, 1987 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
The 35-nation conference reviewing the Helsinki agreements on European security and cooperation recessed Friday for the summer, with the United States warning the Soviet Union that unless there is a significant improvement in its human rights record, the conference cannot succeed. Addressing the final plenary meeting of the conference, which has been in session here for nine months, U.S. Ambassador Warren Zimmerman cited Soviet leader Mikhail S.
NEWS
February 21, 1987 | United Press International
Western countries adopt a double standard when they cheer token political changes in the Soviet Union but reject similar moves in South Africa, former Soviet dissident Natan Sharansky said Friday. Peering through the bars of a mock jail cell across the street from the Soviet Mission to the United Nations, Sharansky repeated charges that the release from prison of Josef Begun and other dissidents are merely "cosmetic gestures" by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|