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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1989
I have been teaching the course on human sexuality at two medical schools for the past seven years. In my opinion, Dr. Neil Schram is only partly correct in his analysis as to the reason that primary care physicians do not inquire into the sexual behavior of their patients ("Physicians' Bias Thwarts AIDS Prevention," Op-Ed Page, Sept. 5). It is without question that only rarely do physicians perform adequate sexual histories. However, his statement that there is a "physician prejudice against homosexual/bisexual men and an aversion to AIDS" is not the basic reason.
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NATIONAL
September 3, 2013 | By David Horsey
For the first time in the history of humanity, children can easily be exposed to the most extreme, misogynistic sex acts imaginable, thanks to the phenomenon of Internet porn. Before the Internet Age, kids learned about sex in a variety of ways. In more repressed societies, it was a fumbling guessing game; in more open places, there were ceremonies, rituals, wise elders and careful teachers who ushered young folks into the mysteries of human sexuality.  For baby boomer boys, such as me, the ritual was standing nervously in front of a drugstore magazine rack and surreptitiously slipping a Playboy between the pages of a Sports Illustrated.
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OPINION
June 2, 2007
Re "Too sexy for my students," Opinion, May 29 Much as some parents might wish to ignore it, these are truths: Younger and younger children are engaging in sexual activity; much of their knowledge of things sexual is learned from peers; and many immature kids are intellectually unprepared to make age-appropriate decisions about sex. Nevertheless, a teacher for an after-school language enrichment program is fired because she tried to provide, in...
OPINION
February 5, 2013
Re "Mahony defends actions," Feb. 2 Cardinal Roger M. Mahony's claim that no one taught him how to respond to sexual abuse committed by priests is preposterous. Does one need a postgraduate college course to know that a crime committed against a child is to be reported to the police? The only changes Mahony has undergone are from hiding and thus supporting the pedophiles to all-out damage control and now, finally, to a steadfast refusal to accept personal responsibility. The former L.A. archbishop seems entirely incapable of understanding what he has done.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1991 | JOHN A. HUFFMAN Jr., Huffman, pastor of the 4,200-member St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church in Newport Beach, was a leading candidate for moderator of the General Assembly, which turned down the sexuality report. He withdrew his candidacy because of a family health crisis
The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (USA) has by its 96% vote overwhelmingly rejected the controversial report on human sexuality. It has tackled some of the toughest issues facing contemporary society in a way that unequivocally reaffirms the authority of biblical revelation. And it has spoken in a way that is just, loving, pastoral and decisive. Its decision is not the sentimental statement of a religious new morality or a secular political correctness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1991 | CHRIS GLASER, Glaser is the author of "Coming Out to God--Prayers for Lesbians, Gay Men, Their Families and Friends." He has served on the denomination's Task Force to Study Homosexuality. and
Lesbians and gay men did not walk away from the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church U.S.A. without hope. The reasoned debate over the human sexuality report did not reflect the same hysteria throughout the denomination on what Presbyterians thought the report said.
NEWS
December 15, 1985 | KEITH B. RICHBURG, The Washington Post
Free and open expression, the hallmark of academia, is being tested in federal court by a topic that, since medieval times, has been largely taboo for public discussion: sex and human sexuality. At issue is the often-secretive, closely guarded ritual of granting university tenure, a process that frequently collides with the lofty goal of preserving academic freedom and a professor's right to say what he thinks.
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | JOHN WILKES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Is sex necessary?" wondered humorist James Thurber in his 1929 book of that title. Even before then, but increasingly since, scientists have been looking at sex. They've described the reproductive activity of nearly every living thing that moves on the Earth, not to mention many more that stand still.
BOOKS
September 7, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, Robert Lee Hotz, author of "Designs On Life: Exploring the New Frontiers of Human Fertility," is also a science writer for The Times
An evolutionary biologist might explain the suburban passion for sport utility vehicles as a mating ploy meant to signal the owner's reproductive fitness. The oversized automobiles are commodious enough for any number of offspring and, like the peacock's tail, show that the owner can divert any amount of energy to ornamental display. So too, an anthropologist might trace the human tribe's obsession with the sex life of celebrities to the primordial biology of the human species.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mona Coates stands in a lecture hall filled with college students and makes a few quick points about compulsions, pornography and "ejaculatory inevitability" before introducing three transvestites who are her guest speakers. At the break, Coates props a mirror on her handbag and tries out a new mascara, on loan from one of the guests. "I love transvestites," she says, blinking at her reflection. "They always know the best makeup." Coates has taught human sexuality at Orange Coast College since 1975, and she has emerged from the sexually tumultuous decades with her colleagues' respect, students' affection and one of the most popular classes on campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
Showtime's "Dexter" two years ago served as a lead-in for the launch of "Homeland," the premium channel's Emmy-winning drama. Now both shows are being used to help launch two new Showtime shows. "Our plan is to harness the strength of these two shows to launch the next generation of new dramas on Showtime," said David Nevins, president of entertainment for Showtime. "Dexter," about a police forensics expert who moonlights as a serial killer, will return to prime time earlier than usual on June 30 as a lead-in to "Ray Donovan," a new drama starring Liev Schreiber. The show centers on a professional "fixer" for the rich and famous.
OPINION
February 23, 2010 | By Dean Hamer and Michael Rosbash
There was an elephant in the San Francisco courtroom where lawyers contested the constitutionality of Proposition 8, the California law that prohibits the marriage of same-sex couples. One key issue should influence every aspect of the Perry vs. Schwarzenegger proceedings yet remained unspoken: What makes people gay? Is it a choice or is it innate? Most geneticists consider sexual orientation a phenotype -- namely, an observable set of properties that varies among individuals. Although physical phenotypes like height and weight are easier to quantify, behavioral phenotypes are intensely studied in animals and humans.
OPINION
December 7, 2009 | By Sharon M. Scott
In his Nov. 22 Times Op-Ed article, "Monogamy isn't easy, naturally," biologist David P. Barash claims that because monogamy is rare in the animal world, it is therefore unnatural behavior for humans. The logic of the argument is critically flawed. In stating that dedication to a single individual is "against" human nature and that no one is "cut out for monogamy," Barash fails to recognize that the human is unlike any other creature on the planet. Comparing our behavior patterns to birds or animals may, at times, prove helpful in understanding our species, but it should not be used to determine what is and what is not "natural" for humans.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2009 | Lori Kozlowski
Chastity Bono's decision to physically become a man has left us to wonder: What happens to those who are physically one sex but want to be the other? Human sexuality then becomes something that has shades of gray, varied interpretations and repercussions far beyond the bedroom. In "Between XX and XY: Intersexuality and the Myth of the Two Sexes," author Gerald Callahan breaks down the general belief that there is only the male and the female. He argues that the idea that there are only two sexes is a mere myth we hold on to to make sex simple.
NATIONAL
August 18, 2009 | Duke Helfand
The nation's largest Lutheran denomination opened debate Monday over a proposal to allow noncelibate gays and lesbians to serve in the clergy. Leaders of the 4.7-million-member Evangelical Lutheran Church in America are expected to decide during their weeklong Churchwide Assembly in Minneapolis whether to alter existing policy, which requires gays and lesbians in ministry to remain celibate. The new policy would permit local congregations, if they wanted, to choose ministers or lay leaders who were in "lifelong, monogamous, same-gender relationships."
OPINION
June 2, 2007
Re "Too sexy for my students," Opinion, May 29 Much as some parents might wish to ignore it, these are truths: Younger and younger children are engaging in sexual activity; much of their knowledge of things sexual is learned from peers; and many immature kids are intellectually unprepared to make age-appropriate decisions about sex. Nevertheless, a teacher for an after-school language enrichment program is fired because she tried to provide, in...
NEWS
September 4, 2000 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When parents engage in the big sex talk with their children, it's likely that more than a few still call it the story of "the birds and the bees." It's a safe, comfortable way to get into a potentially embarrassing discussion, safe enough even for the name of a column in a family newspaper. But where did the phrase come from, and when did it crystallize among the masses into a euphemism for sex?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
San Francisco State University is launching the first program in the advanced study of sexuality in the Western United States. The 30-unit master's program includes courses on the sociocultural foundations of human sexuality, sexual cultures and diversity, disability and sexuality, sexual identity formation, and sexual and gender role development and behavior.
NATIONAL
October 20, 2005 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
David and Tonia Parker are asking their neighbors in this liberal town for one consideration: Tolerance. The Parkers believe homosexuality is immoral. So they were appalled when their son brought a picture book home from kindergarten that showed families with same-sex parents. To ensure his "spiritual safety," they demanded the right to pull him out of class whenever homosexuality was discussed. To deny them that right, they say, would be intolerant of their faith.
OPINION
November 28, 2004 | James H. Jones, James H. Jones is the author of "Alfred C. Kinsey: A Public/Private Life and "Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment."
What I admire most about the new movie "Kinsey" is its re-creation of a world in which Victorian attitudes enshroud human sexuality in taboos, ignorance and repression. It shows how badly mid-20th century Americans really needed Alfred C. Kinsey. No scientist has polarized Americans more than this pioneer sex researcher.
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