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Human T Cell Lymphotrophic Virus Type 1

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese researchers have demonstrated that a human virus called HTLV-1 can cause rheumatoid arthritis in mice. Experts said the discovery provides strong proof that viruses can cause arthritis. HTLV-1 is a so-called retrovirus, closely related to the AIDS virus, that is capable of inserting its own genetic information into the genes of its host during an infection. It causes leukemia and at least two rare degenerative nerve disorders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese researchers have demonstrated that a human virus called HTLV-1 can cause rheumatoid arthritis in mice. Experts said the discovery provides strong proof that viruses can cause arthritis. HTLV-1 is a so-called retrovirus, closely related to the AIDS virus, that is capable of inserting its own genetic information into the genes of its host during an infection. It causes leukemia and at least two rare degenerative nerve disorders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1989 | JUDY BERLFEIN, Berlfein is a free-lance science writer based in Encinitas. and
It was only a decade ago. The medical community was feeling quite secure. It had stamped out smallpox, put a hold on polio, held tuberculosis at bay. Vaccines and antibiotics had saved us from bacterial and viral infections; wide-scale epidemics were now a topic for history books. But the picture changed drastically in 1981 when doctors first diagnosed a patient as having AIDS. A new disease had appeared on the horizon, an illness caused by a contagious agent now known as a retrovirus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1989 | JUDY BERLFEIN, Berlfein is a free-lance science writer based in Encinitas. and
It was only a decade ago. The medical community was feeling quite secure. It had stamped out smallpox, put a hold on polio, held tuberculosis at bay. Vaccines and antibiotics had saved us from bacterial and viral infections; wide-scale epidemics were now a topic for history books. But the picture changed drastically in 1981 when doctors first diagnosed a patient as having AIDS. A new disease had appeared on the horizon, an illness caused by a contagious agent now known as a retrovirus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Scientists last week reported evidence debunking the theory that a distant relative of the AIDS virus that causes leukemia could be spread by insects. The researchers said they produced evidence that mosquitoes and ticks do not transmit HTLV-1, the human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, a virus related to the AIDS virus that causes leukemia. "This is reassuring," said Dr. Edward Murphy, an assistant professor of laboratory medicine at UC San Francisco, who headed the research reported in a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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