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Human Trials

NEWS
June 15, 1998 | JOHN SCHWARTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
A closely watched new fat-fighting drug appears to help people lose weight, researchers announced Sunday. In its first test on human subjects, leptin, a naturally occurring hormone discovered less than four years ago, helped patients lose an average of almost 16 pounds over six months. Andrew S. Greenberg, an obesity specialist at Tufts University who led the study, cautioned that research on the drug is at a very early stage.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Initial human tests of EntreMed Inc.'s angiostatin and endostatin experimental drugs to fight cancer could begin once enough of the compounds can be made, most likely by next year, said Judah Folkman, the Harvard University cancer researcher who discovered the drugs. Rockville, Md.-based EntreMed is developing the two drugs, which have been shown to shrink tumors in mice, in a partnership with the government's National Cancer Institute.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | PAUL RECER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In research that could lead to human clinical studies next year, researchers have shown that transferring tumor-related proteins from one species to another may trigger a strong immune-system attack against cancer. Researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York have found that injecting a protein found on the surface of human melanoma cancer cells into a cancer-ridden mouse will cause the rodent's immune system to attack and kill the mouse's own cancers. Next year, said Dr.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1996 | BARBARA MURPHY
Amgen Inc. has begun the first human clinical trial of a new drug to treat Parkinson's disease, a devastating illness that affects about 1 million Americans. The disease, characterized by rigidity, tremors and difficulty initiating movement, results when neurons in the brain that contain dopamine become inactive. Officials with the Thousand Oaks-based biotechnology company said their new drug reversed Parkinson's symptoms in previous tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Oregon researchers are preparing to begin human trials of a new, nonsurgical technique to prevent pregnancies. The procedure involves inserting small metal coils into the Fallopian tubes through a tiny catheter. The coils interfere with the movement of eggs and sperm, blocking pregnancy. Dr. Amy Thurmond told a meeting of the Society of Cardiovascular Interventional Radiology that they had successfully performed the painless procedure on 13 of 14 women who were undergoing hysterectomies.
NEWS
September 26, 1995 | CURT SUPLEE, THE WASHINGTON POST
Apainless ultrasound drug-delivery system may soon replace the dreaded hypodermic needle in many instances. That could be a real shot in the arm for millions of people--such as diabetics who require frequent injections of insulin--for whom syringes are an unending torment that also carry the risk of infection. For years, scientists have sought non-invasive ways of getting crucial drugs to diffuse across the skin and into the bloodstream.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1995 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the moment, Amgen Inc. has a jump on its competition in the race to market a promising new blood hormone. And although it's way too early to salute a medical breakthrough, analysts are saying nice things for a change. "We're seeing the rebirth of a biotechnology company," glowed Edmund A. Debler, an analyst with New York-based Mehta & Isaly. Just a year ago, Debler was bemoaning Amgen's scanty research pipeline.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1994
Cortex Pharmaceuticals Inc. has started human clinical trials with a drug it is developing for treatment of memory loss resulting from Alzheimer's disease. The firm said the study of its Ampakine product is aimed at gaining knowledge of the safety of the compound on humans. The study, being conducted in Berlin, involves 48 people and will last about six weeks.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1993
Cardiac Science Inc. has raised $1 million in a stock sale to underwrite human clinical trials scheduled to begin this year. Chief Executive Howard Cooper said the first clinical trials will be conducted in medical centers in New York, Boston, Atlanta and Phoenix. A date for those tests is not yet known, he added. The company is working on what could be the nation's first portable heart defibrillator.
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