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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1991
Regarding "A Test of Faith" (March 10), about choreographer Bill T. Jones: Hold on a minute, Mr. Jones, you've got it all backwards. You say, "I'm a humanist, as all Christians are supposed to be." No way. No Christian can be a humanist or a humanist a Christian. (If you mean humanitarian , of course that's what Christians should be.) Humanism is any system in which human interests, reason, scientific inquiry and self-fulfillment predominate. Today's results are yuppies, feminists and those with alternate lifestyles, among others demanding their "rights."
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NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
An anonymous family of New Jersey atheists is asking a state judge to find that the words “under God” should be stricken from the Pledge of Allegiance. The lawsuit , filed Monday, is nearly identical to one brought in Massachusetts by an unidentified family there. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court could rule in that case any day. “Public schools should not engage in an exercise that tells students that patriotism is tied to a belief in God,” said David Niose, an attorney for the American Humanist Assn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1991
I don't understand (March 24) letter writer Patti Garrity's classification system regarding humanism and Christianity. Why can't choreographer Bill Jones be both a humanist and a Christian? If humanism is defined as a predominant interest in human affairs, then it seems that God too is a humanist. Didn't he so love the (very human) world that he gave his only son? DAVID M. SCHOELEN Riverside
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
In spite of what the tabloidy typography in the title sequence might suggest, "Rob the Mob" skims over the lifted-from-the-headlines exploits of an outlaw couple and gleans a humanist drama steeped in sentimentality. Michael Pitt and Nina Arianda star as Tommy and Rosie Uva, real-life lovebirds who held up a series of mob social clubs in the early 1990s after learning from the John Gotti trial that the bling-adorned clientele was customarily unarmed. Director Raymond De Felitta, who, finally scoring a sleeper breakout in 2009 with "City Island," resumes painting New York in nostalgia in this film, much as he did in "Two Family House" (2000)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1996
Bravo and thank you, Martin Bernheimer! The Verdi of music critics. Never content with mediocrity. For the insight, knowledge, wit, brilliant and delicious way with words. Always candid and passionate about the arts. A humanist, long overdue for another Pulitzer Prize. Auf Wiedersehen, keep in touch. ANNE LUCKERMAN Tustin
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1996
Thank you for your fine article in the Jan. 20 edition concerning the philosophy of Thomas Knopke, math teacher at Fullerton's Nicholas Junior High. Knopke's philosophy mirrors the philosophies of Thomas Paine, Thomas Jefferson and many of our early patriots. They believed in humanism, not fundamentalism. All were heavily criticized in their day for not being sufficiently Christian, just as Knopke is now being criticized for his humanist beliefs. But only a humanist like Paine could have inspired the colonists to stand up against tyranny by writing "Common Sense."
NEWS
December 11, 1988
Marilyn Ferguson's emotional letter (Dec. 2) reacting to the Committee for the Scientific Examination of Claims of the Paranormal's conference Nov. 13 has numerous inaccuracies. The Humanist article she incorrectly quotes is mine. I did not call healers "vermin of the Earth" as she states. I observed that fraudulent and unethical faith healers were the vermin of religion. This conclusion was not a hysterical utterance as she alleges. It was based on a three-year study of religious faith healers whose unethical methods are known and whose motivation is more that of collecting money than helping people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1989 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
As libel lawsuits go, the case of Mike McHugh vs. Frank Mortynis far from the cutting edge of the legal frontier. In the balance are none of the constitutional issues often at stake in these battles, such as freedom of the press and the right to privacy. No, this is just a mean and nasty, toe-to-toe fight between two strong-willed antagonists and rival freethinkers, both well known in the San Diego humanist community. So far, McHugh, a 67-year-old Spring Valley man who makes custom jewelry, is winning.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Some “non-theist” individuals and groups are aggrieved that not even one seat was reserved for a nonbeliever at the service for victims of the Boston Marathon bombings, despite a request for some recognition from the Secular Coalition for America. Joined by some Christian and Jewish clergy, they have been circulating a petition calling on Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Melissa Rogers, the director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, to “meet with the Humanist and non-theistic community to discuss how to ensure that future gatherings like the Interfaith Healing Service after the Boston Marathon bombing include all Americans.” My first reaction was to concede that the “non-theists” had a point but that their objection was an abstract and self-serving one. They had a point because the service, which was held in Boston's Roman Catholic cathedral and featured religious leaders from a variety of traditions, was a civic occasion as well as a religious one. And wasn't it President Obama who said in his first inaugural address that “we are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus, and nonbelievers.” At the same time, I thought, it wasn't surprising that no atheists received VIP invitations to “Healing Our City: An Interfaith Service,” let alone speaking parts in the ceremony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1990
As a Christian minister (now retired) and as an American, I was appalled, upon reading Patrick Buchanan's hysterical diatribe against Brennan (Commentary, July 24) by his charge that "nominally Catholic Brennan was a militant humanist who led the Warren Court's relentless campaign to de-Christianize America." In a time when religious pluralism has come to be respected by most Americans, such arrogant parochialism is not only ludicrous, but worthy of contempt. More than that, its implications for national policy are dangerous.
OPINION
November 7, 2013 | By Robert Zaretsky
Albert Camus, who would be 100 years old Thursday, is ageless. The French Algerian's life and work reflect the long tragedy of the 20th century, marked by disquiet, genocide and violence, but his diagnosis of our absurd condition, and his effort to find not a cure (there is none) but the proper response, tie him just as firmly to the new millennium. Camus lived on intimate terms with the absurd. He lost his father, whom he never knew, in the war to end all wars that emphatically failed in that regard.
NATIONAL
August 17, 2013 | By David Zucchino
Jason Heap grew up in Texas among Baptists and Lutherans. He earned a master's from Brite Divinity School at Texas Christian University. Now, at age 38, Heap wants to be a U.S. Navy chaplain. But Heap is a humanist who doesn't believe in God, and the U.S. military has never sanctioned a humanist chaplain. Nor has the Navy acted on Heap's application, filed last month, to become its first approved humanist chaplain. Heap says he's not trying to make a point or bring attention to himself.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Some “non-theist” individuals and groups are aggrieved that not even one seat was reserved for a nonbeliever at the service for victims of the Boston Marathon bombings, despite a request for some recognition from the Secular Coalition for America. Joined by some Christian and Jewish clergy, they have been circulating a petition calling on Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Melissa Rogers, the director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, to “meet with the Humanist and non-theistic community to discuss how to ensure that future gatherings like the Interfaith Healing Service after the Boston Marathon bombing include all Americans.” My first reaction was to concede that the “non-theists” had a point but that their objection was an abstract and self-serving one. They had a point because the service, which was held in Boston's Roman Catholic cathedral and featured religious leaders from a variety of traditions, was a civic occasion as well as a religious one. And wasn't it President Obama who said in his first inaugural address that “we are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus, and nonbelievers.” At the same time, I thought, it wasn't surprising that no atheists received VIP invitations to “Healing Our City: An Interfaith Service,” let alone speaking parts in the ceremony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Philosopher Paul Kurtz was called many unflattering names during his long career, including "Satanic free-thinker" and "dangerous corrupter of young minds. " But the name some of his critics considered most damning was the one he most prized. They called him a secular humanist. "You can call me a skeptic, a non-theist, an atheist, an agnostic, a skeptical, agnostic atheist, but the best term," Kurtz, a champion of science and debunker of religions and the supernatural, told the Associated Press years ago, "is secular humanist.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Another Earth" is quietly and movingly out of this world. Director Mike Cahill has woven sci-fi imaginings and quantum physics theories of parallel universes into a provocative meditation on the prospect of rewriting your life history. It is no simple task to spin such abstract notions into smart (versus cheesy) entertainment, but there is such a strong creative voice stirring in Cahill's first feature that it's easy to forgive the shortcomings. The film stars the ethereal young actress Brit Marling, who co-wrote and co-produced with Cahill, and the rock-solid William Mapother (Ethan on "Lost")
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Father of My Children" showcases a vividly authentic look at the way movies are made, but you would never call it a film about filmmaking. And while its plot pivots around a melodramatic event, it is anything but a melodrama. Instead, what French writer-director Mia Hansen-Love has created is an extraordinarily empathetic humanistic drama, a film of love, joy, sadness and hope that understands how complex our emotions are and does beautiful justice to them. The father of the title is producer Grégoire Canvel (Louis-Do de Lencquesaing)
MAGAZINE
August 3, 2003
I wish to clarify that, despite a clear implication to the contrary, I did not teach the class in film theory that David Weddle's daughter took and which led to his dismay over wasted tuition dollars ("Lights, Camera, Narratology?" July 13). Considering Weddle's good-spirited attempt to capture my lecturing style, I should say, "It was NOOOOT! my class." In my theory classes, however, I am trying to expose young adults to a comprehensive range of ideas to stimulate their curiosity, interest, critical thought and, eventually, their informed participation in the political process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a self-proclaimed skeptic who decries many religious beliefs as simply dumb, humorist-author Steve Allen shows up as a welcome figure in a surprising number of tabernacles. Best known as the original host of television's "Tonight Show," Allen is an ex-Catholic who spoke before a conference of 600 Jesuits last year and a secular humanist favorite who addressed a major religious communications conference the year before.
OPINION
December 12, 2009
A seasonal display? Re "Humanists launch a holiday campaign," Dec. 7 As a former head of the American Humanist Assn., I am embarrassed by the organization's rather puerile "good without God" campaign. Advertising what humanists are for is more important than stressing what is not included in our beliefs. Mere nonbelief is negative -- and emphasizing the negative invites blowback and hinders mutual understanding and respect. In essence, humanism is about ethics, compassion, civil liberties, religious freedom, separation of church and state, peace, women's rights, protecting the environment, social justice, reason and science and democracy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2009 | By Duke Helfand
As the calendar goes, December tends to be a winning month for God. Christians celebrate the birth of Christ. Jews mark the story of Hanukkah. Muslims this year will observe the start of Al-Hijra, the Islamic New Year. And the American Humanist Assn. has decided to join the festivities with an alternative celebration in mind. The group, consisting of atheists and others who say they embrace reason over religion, has launched a national godless holiday campaign, with ads appearing inside or on 250 buses in five U.S. cities, including Los Angeles and San Francisco starting today.
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