Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHumanitas Prizes
IN THE NEWS

Humanitas Prizes

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004 | From a Times staff writer
Steven Knight and Tony Kushner won $25,000 each Thursday at the annual Humanitas Prizes, given to movie and TV writers whose scripts "entertain and enrich the viewing public." Knight won for the feature film "Dirty Pretty Things"; Kushner was honored for HBO's "Angels in America." Other winners included Barbara Hall for the pilot episode of CBS' "Joan of Arcadia" and JacQui Clay for an installment of Fox's "The Bernie Mac Show."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
Nancy Oliver, the writer of "Lars and the Real Girl," and Ronald Harwood, who wrote "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," shared the feature film award Wednesday at the annual Humanitas Prizes, which honor film and TV scripts that "explore the human condition . . . and reveal our common humanity." Television winners included Daniel Giat for the HBO movie "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee," Kirk Ellis for the opening chapter of the HBO miniseries "John Adams," Dave Tennant for an episode of NBC's "Scrubs" called "My Long Goodbye," Brian Hohlfeld for an episode of "My Friends Tigger & Pooh" and Ann Austen, Douglas Sloan, Max Enscoe and Annie DeYoung for "Johnny Kapahala: Back on Board."
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1985
The writers of TV movies about teen-age drug abuse, teen-age suicide and a woman struggling to raise her family during World War II have been nominated for the top award in the 1985 Humanitas Prizes, given for TV programs that "most fully communicate human values." Winners of the 11th annual Humanitas awards, given by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Institute, will be announced Tuesday at a luncheon in Los Angeles.
NEWS
June 29, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
The Oscar-winning "Crash" picked up another honor Wednesday as writers Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco won the feature film category of the annual Humanitas Prizes for movie and TV screenplays that "entertain, engage and enrich the viewing public." Among other winners were Richard Curtis for the TV movie "The Girl in the Cafe" on HBO; David Shore for an episode of Fox's "House" and Greg Garcia for the pilot of NBC's "My Name Is Earl."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1997
Writers Mike Leigh, Walter Bernstein and Horton Foote each won $25,000 Wednesday in the 23rd annual Humanitas Prizes for television programs and motion pictures "that most fully communicate human values to their audiences." They and four other writers shared a total of $120,000 that was handed out by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Educational and Cultural Institute in an effort to encourage screenplays that affirm human dignity and explore the meaning of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1992
Writers from three "I'll Fly Away" episodes are in the running for cash awards in the 18th annual Humanitas Prizes, which reward the writers of TV programs judged to "most fully enrich the viewing audience." The first-year NBC drama captured two nominations in the category for 60-minute programs, which carries a $15,000 prize, and another in the category for programs 90 minutes or longer, which carries a $25,000 prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1988
The writers of two episodes of the long-running "Cagney & Lacey" show and an installment of the first-year series "thirtysomething" have been nominated for the $15,000 award in the annual Humanitas Prizes for "humanizing achievement in television writing." A total of $70,000 in prizes is given out each year by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Institute to the writers of TV entertainment programs who are judged to have done the best job of communicating enriching values to the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1990 | ALEENE MacMINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A CBS television movie about school desegregation in Boston and episodes of two popular ABC series, "thirtysomething" and "The Wonder Years," took cash awards Wednesday as the 16th annual Humanitas Prizes were bestowed for "humanizing achievement" in television writing. "Common Ground, Part II," which aired last March on CBS, won Edward Hume $25,000 for his teleplay depicting the tension surrounding the mandated desegregation of Boston's public schools in the 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1993
Writers from "Roseanne" and "I'll Fly Away" were among the winners Wednesday of the annual Humanitas Prizes for "humanizing achievement in television writing," as $95,000 in awards were handed out by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
NBC's "Frasier," CBS' "Picket Fences" and the feature film "Dead Man Walking" were among the entertainment fare honored Thursday with the 22nd annual Humanitas Prizes for TV and film scripts that "enrich the lives of the viewing public." The cash awards, handed out by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Educational & Cultural Institute, are given to writers to encourage the creation of scripts that affirm human dignity and probe the meaning of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2004 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
It began back in 1974, a low-key award ceremony no bigger than a Shriners convention held at the Sportsmen's Lodge in the San Fernando Valley. Back then, the Humanitas Prize quietly honored television screenwriters who managed to do good while also doing well. Small cash prizes were handed out to reward scripts carrying progressive messages felt to advance mankind's self-understanding and somehow encourage the golden rule: love thy neighbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2002 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The screenplays for the movie "Iris," the HBO presentation of "The Laramie Project" and an episode of NBC's "The West Wing" in which President Bartlet questions his faith in God were among the winners of 2002 Humanitas Prizes, the annual movie and TV writing awards established by the late Father Ellwood "Bud" Kieser. The awards were presented Tuesday at a luncheon in Universal City.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kenneth Lonergan film "You Can Count on Me" and an HBO adaptation of the play "Wit" were among the winners of 2001 Humanitas Prizes, the awards begun in 1974 by the late Father Ellwood E. Kieser to honor film and television writers for work that honestly explores the human condition. The prizes were presented Thursday at a luncheon in Universal City. The winners received cash awards between $10,000 and $25,000.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judith Conway Greening, television producer and executive director of the Humanitas Prize organization, has died of cancer. She was 60. Greening, who also organized children's theatrical groups, died Saturday in her Sherman Oaks home, said her husband, Thomas Greening. The Humanitas Prize, which Judith Greening oversaw and announced each year, is awarded to television and motion picture writers whose scripts affirm human dignity and meaningful values.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Matt Damon and Ben Affleck, already Oscar and Golden Globe winners for the film "Good Will Hunting," added to their list of honors Thursday at the 24th annual Humanitas Prize presentation, recognizing scripts that "communicate those values which most enrich the human person." The two actor-writers shared a $25,000 prize for their screenplay, which judges praised for displaying "the power of friendship, honesty and love to heal the wounds of the past."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1997
Writers Mike Leigh, Walter Bernstein and Horton Foote each won $25,000 Wednesday in the 23rd annual Humanitas Prizes for television programs and motion pictures "that most fully communicate human values to their audiences." They and four other writers shared a total of $120,000 that was handed out by the Pacific Palisades-based Human Family Educational and Cultural Institute in an effort to encourage screenplays that affirm human dignity and explore the meaning of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2002 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The screenplays for the movie "Iris," the HBO presentation of "The Laramie Project" and an episode of NBC's "The West Wing" in which President Bartlet questions his faith in God were among the winners of 2002 Humanitas Prizes, the annual movie and TV writing awards established by the late Father Ellwood "Bud" Kieser. The awards were presented Tuesday at a luncheon in Universal City.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|