Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHumbert Humbert
IN THE NEWS

Humbert Humbert

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
In a widely circulated interview with Publishers Weekly, writer Claire Messud was asked if she would want to be friends with the protagonist of her new novel, "The Woman Upstairs. " She responded with frustration: "For heaven's sake, what kind of question is that? Would you want to be friends with Humbert Humbert?" Her point: Humbert Humbert was a creep, but "Lolita" didn't suffer from his lack of likability. Messud went on to list a number of other iconic characters who would make lousy friends, including Hamlet, Oscar Wao and Raskolnikov.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
In a widely circulated interview with Publishers Weekly, writer Claire Messud was asked if she would want to be friends with the protagonist of her new novel, "The Woman Upstairs. " She responded with frustration: "For heaven's sake, what kind of question is that? Would you want to be friends with Humbert Humbert?" Her point: Humbert Humbert was a creep, but "Lolita" didn't suffer from his lack of likability. Messud went on to list a number of other iconic characters who would make lousy friends, including Hamlet, Oscar Wao and Raskolnikov.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1990 | Sean Mitchell and John M. Wilson \f7
"It's a minefield, a movie that's guaranteed to offend everyone." That's how screenwriter James Dearden ("Fatal Attraction") describes his task of adapting Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita" for filming in the 1990s. Carolco Pictures International paid $1 million to the Nabokov estate to acquire rights to film a new version of the tale of 40ish professor Humbert Humbert's obsessive lust for a 12-year-old girl. Adrian Lyne ("Fatal Attraction," "9 1/2 Weeks") will direct.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2003 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
What do Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and Humbert Humbert have in common? Not much, at first glance -- the stern leader of Iran's Islamic revolution; the depraved but eloquent antihero of Vladimir Nabokov's most famous fiction, "Lolita." But U.S.-educated Azar Nafisi, who taught Western literature at universities in Tehran from 1979 to 1995, knows better. Khomeini was a visionary who tried to drag Iran back to the 6th century, the time of the prophet Muhammad.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1990
Concerning "A 'Lolita' for the '90s," in the June 10 Outtakes: The original 1962 movie version of Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita" may have only featured "a pedicure as the film's most erotic scene," but the considerable combined talent of Stanley Kubrick, James Mason, Peter Sellers and Shelley Winters managed to produce a near-masterpiece that more that adequately brought the painful psychology of Humbert Humbert to the screen. That individuals with the track records of James Dearden, Adrian Lyne and Carolco International should feel that they can do better with such a supremely delicate subject can only serve as a further demonstration of the overweening arrogance, shameless exploitation and transcendental lack of taste driving too much of contemporary Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1995
Regarding British director Adrian Lyne's upcoming attempt to remake the film "Lolita" ("Not Your Average Nymphet," Calendar, July 14) and his comments that "I could make a movie about a 13-year-old girl getting chopped up and eaten and no one in the United States would say anything." Well, I am here to say to Lyne: Wrong! No matter how you package garbage, no matter what label you put on it, garbage is still garbage. Whether it is labeled satanic cannibalism or erotic, gratuitous sex, it's garbage.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers film for The Times Orange County Edition.
I can remember the ad campaign for "Lolita" clearly. It was 1962, I was 9, and the advertising suggestively screamed "How did they ever make a movie out of 'Lolita'?" Then there was Sue Lyon, the 14-year-old unknown chosen to play novelist Vladimir Nabokov's most famous erotic symbol. Her pretty adolescent features were the top of beauty to a kid just beginning to sense the links between aura and sex appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
When towering Abraham Lincoln met tiny Harriet Beecher Stowe, or so the story goes, he peered down at the woman whose "Uncle Tom's Cabin" had inflamed the North against slavery and said, "So this is the little lady who started the big war." And so it is on finally seeing "Lolita." Shown to and refused by studio executives early in 1997, debuting in Europe in September and finally opening in Los Angeles 10 months later for a one-week Academy Award-qualifying run before going nationwide Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2003 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
What do Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and Humbert Humbert have in common? Not much, at first glance -- the stern leader of Iran's Islamic revolution; the depraved but eloquent antihero of Vladimir Nabokov's most famous fiction, "Lolita." But U.S.-educated Azar Nafisi, who taught Western literature at universities in Tehran from 1979 to 1995, knows better. Khomeini was a visionary who tried to drag Iran back to the 6th century, the time of the prophet Muhammad.
BOOKS
September 28, 1986 | Reviewed by Peter Heinegg, Heinegg, a critic and teacher of comparative literature, has translated and written an introduction to Tolstoy's "A Confession."
"The Enchanter" is a dark, agonized, involuted novella (55 typewritten pages in the original) that Vladimir Nabokov wrote in 1939, the final work of Russian fiction he would produce. The next year, he emigrated to America, and some time after that, he felt so dissatisfied with this "first little throb of 'Lolita' " that he destroyed the manuscript.
BOOKS
October 24, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
Speak, memory. It was 1947, October, maybe November. I was in the Ramsdale Orpheum with my Uncle Eddie watching his pal Dutch Reagan in one of those feel good war shorts, when she walked in with her mom and the man we later came to know as Humbert Humbert and sat down in front of us. I don't think she knew who I was, except for some guy in her seventh grade class.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
When towering Abraham Lincoln met tiny Harriet Beecher Stowe, or so the story goes, he peered down at the woman whose "Uncle Tom's Cabin" had inflamed the North against slavery and said, "So this is the little lady who started the big war." And so it is on finally seeing "Lolita." Shown to and refused by studio executives early in 1997, debuting in Europe in September and finally opening in Los Angeles 10 months later for a one-week Academy Award-qualifying run before going nationwide Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1995
Regarding British director Adrian Lyne's upcoming attempt to remake the film "Lolita" ("Not Your Average Nymphet," Calendar, July 14) and his comments that "I could make a movie about a 13-year-old girl getting chopped up and eaten and no one in the United States would say anything." Well, I am here to say to Lyne: Wrong! No matter how you package garbage, no matter what label you put on it, garbage is still garbage. Whether it is labeled satanic cannibalism or erotic, gratuitous sex, it's garbage.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers film for The Times Orange County Edition.
I can remember the ad campaign for "Lolita" clearly. It was 1962, I was 9, and the advertising suggestively screamed "How did they ever make a movie out of 'Lolita'?" Then there was Sue Lyon, the 14-year-old unknown chosen to play novelist Vladimir Nabokov's most famous erotic symbol. Her pretty adolescent features were the top of beauty to a kid just beginning to sense the links between aura and sex appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1990
Concerning "A 'Lolita' for the '90s," in the June 10 Outtakes: The original 1962 movie version of Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita" may have only featured "a pedicure as the film's most erotic scene," but the considerable combined talent of Stanley Kubrick, James Mason, Peter Sellers and Shelley Winters managed to produce a near-masterpiece that more that adequately brought the painful psychology of Humbert Humbert to the screen. That individuals with the track records of James Dearden, Adrian Lyne and Carolco International should feel that they can do better with such a supremely delicate subject can only serve as a further demonstration of the overweening arrogance, shameless exploitation and transcendental lack of taste driving too much of contemporary Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1990 | Sean Mitchell and John M. Wilson \f7
"It's a minefield, a movie that's guaranteed to offend everyone." That's how screenwriter James Dearden ("Fatal Attraction") describes his task of adapting Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita" for filming in the 1990s. Carolco Pictures International paid $1 million to the Nabokov estate to acquire rights to film a new version of the tale of 40ish professor Humbert Humbert's obsessive lust for a 12-year-old girl. Adrian Lyne ("Fatal Attraction," "9 1/2 Weeks") will direct.
BOOKS
October 24, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
Speak, memory. It was 1947, October, maybe November. I was in the Ramsdale Orpheum with my Uncle Eddie watching his pal Dutch Reagan in one of those feel good war shorts, when she walked in with her mom and the man we later came to know as Humbert Humbert and sat down in front of us. I don't think she knew who I was, except for some guy in her seventh grade class.
MAGAZINE
May 4, 1997 | J.R. Moehringer, J.R. Moehringer is a Times staff writer. He last wrote for the magazine about a fatal car accident involving eight Orange County teenagers
I'm sitting in a hotel room in Columbus, Ohio, waiting for a call from a man who doesn't trust me, hoping he'll have answers about a man I don't trust, which may clear the name of a man no one gives a damn about. To distract myself from this uneasy vigil--and from the phone that never rings, and from the icy rain that never stops pelting the window--I light a cigar and open a 40-year-old newspaper.
BOOKS
September 28, 1986 | Reviewed by Peter Heinegg, Heinegg, a critic and teacher of comparative literature, has translated and written an introduction to Tolstoy's "A Confession."
"The Enchanter" is a dark, agonized, involuted novella (55 typewritten pages in the original) that Vladimir Nabokov wrote in 1939, the final work of Russian fiction he would produce. The next year, he emigrated to America, and some time after that, he felt so dissatisfied with this "first little throb of 'Lolita' " that he destroyed the manuscript.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|