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Humberto Roque Villanueva

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NEWS
December 16, 1996 | From Reuters
Humberto Roque Villanueva was elected Sunday as the leader of Mexico's ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, and pledged that the fractured party will rally behind President Ernesto Zedillo.
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NEWS
December 16, 1996 | From Reuters
Humberto Roque Villanueva was elected Sunday as the leader of Mexico's ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, and pledged that the fractured party will rally behind President Ernesto Zedillo.
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NEWS
December 15, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's longtime ruling party, desperately seeking strong leadership to face crucial elections next year, prepared Saturday to choose a new president. The party, which has been buffeted by election losses and infighting, is expected to choose the president of the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of Congress, in a meeting today.
NEWS
November 4, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JOSE DIAZ BRISENO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Four candidates competing in the first-ever presidential primary of Mexico's ruling party wrapped up their campaigns Wednesday amid raucous rallies and protests of dirty tricks. The latest polls showed Francisco Labastida, a close ally of President Ernesto Zedillo, in the lead. But the barbs flying between Labastida and his chief opponent, Roberto Madrazo, raised questions about whether the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, will suffer a devastating split after Sunday's election.
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just three weeks after he resigned from this nation's ruling party, Dante Delgado, a former Veracruz governor, was in jail Wednesday, charged with illegally amassing a $57-million fortune while chief executive of Mexico's oil-rich Gulf coast state. Authorities described the embezzlement and influence-peddling charges against the former ruling-party stalwart as dramatic proof of the Mexican government's crackdown on official corruption.
NEWS
August 2, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The party that has ruled Mexico for 70 years kicked off its first presidential primary Sunday, pushing into uncharted waters in a high-stakes attempt to transform itself from a tool of the presidency into a democratic institution. More than 1,000 members of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, packed an auditorium here for the ceremony opening a three-month campaign by four candidates set to conclude in an unprecedented nationwide popular vote.
NEWS
November 9, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an overwhelming triumph in Mexico's first open presidential primary, Francisco Labastida has become the odds-on favorite to win the presidency next year and keep the world's longest-ruling party in power into the 21st century. Labastida, 57, a three-time Cabinet member widely perceived as the favorite of leaders of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, has two big advantages as he heads into the July 2000 race.
NEWS
January 25, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an idea so startling it left Mexicans gaping: Before taking office, President Ernesto Zedillo pledged to cut the umbilical cord between the ruling party and the powerful presidency. No longer would the president use the party as his personal machine to run the country--funneling it government money, dictating its policies and selecting its presidential candidate.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three days, former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari suddenly has been the talk of the town again here, as the Reforma newspaper has been splashing on its front page installments of the first interview he has given since he slipped out of this country almost two years ago.
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trading insults and accusations, presidential hopefuls of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party plunged into unprecedented fiery arguments Wednesday night in the first-ever debate among candidates for the party's presidential nomination. All four candidates, including front-runner Francisco Labastida and upstart challenger Roberto Madrazo, joined a strikingly open exchange that was rife with criticism of the way their party has governed Mexico.
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