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Humboldt Redwood Co

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2010 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Buried in the details of the deal to close California's $19-billion budget deficit is a roughly $30-million tax break crafted to benefit a company owned by members of one of the state's richest and most politically influential families, according to a legislative analysis obtained by The Times. The provision, which will allow the Humboldt Redwood Co. to deduct $20 million in old losses from future taxes, is also expected to cover penalties and interest for the firm co-owned by three sons of Donald G. Fisher, founder of the Gap and Banana Republic, said company Chairman Sandy Dean.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2010 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Buried in the details of the deal to close California's $19-billion budget deficit is a roughly $30-million tax break crafted to benefit a company owned by members of one of the state's richest and most politically influential families, according to a legislative analysis obtained by The Times. The provision, which will allow the Humboldt Redwood Co. to deduct $20 million in old losses from future taxes, is also expected to cover penalties and interest for the firm co-owned by three sons of Donald G. Fisher, founder of the Gap and Banana Republic, said company Chairman Sandy Dean.
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OPINION
August 30, 2008
Re "A truce amid the redwoods," Aug. 24 I'm glad this article was on the front page -- that's where it belonged. I wish others could take steps toward understanding and accommodating those with different views. Mike Jani, president of Humboldt Redwood Co., indicated that his company would address concerns of the "tree-sitting" protesters. In turn, one of the protesters, Amy Arcuri, made a positive and forward-looking statement that there will be squabbles but that she hopes trust can prevail.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A company owned by the founders of Gap Inc. took control of the bankrupt Pacific Lumber Co. on Wednesday, marking a new chapter in the history of one of the country's oldest and most controversial timber firms. Pacific Lumber's logging practices over the last two decades under Maxxam Inc. of Houston have drawn widespread opposition from environmentalists. The deal was completed after Mendocino Redwood Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2008 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Beneath the gnarled green-needled boughs of the North Coast redwoods, a remarkable encounter one recent day shook the roots of the forest's fiercest struggle. A top timber company executive hiked into the woods with a message for the latest generation of tree sitters perched on platforms high in the massive limbs of the ancient trees they've campaigned to protect. Come down out of the sky, he told them. The war is over. With that, a cautious transformation has begun: For the first time in the memory of even the grayest of locals, the vast lands of Humboldt County's most storied timber firm could soon be devoid of protest.
OPINION
October 10, 2010
Left, right and illegal immigration Re "Illogical on immigration," Editorial, Oct. 5 Your editorial was about as fair and balanced as possible. However, I am sure someone will find a way to interpret it as too left or right. By the way, we are all hypocrites on this matter. H. Sheldon Wright Temple City Your editorial concludes with an accusation of Meg Whitman being a hypocrite. Because she is placed in such a brittle position, her best defense is to be a bit "squishy.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2009 | Alana Semuels
Ron Barlow's 34-year career at the sawmill in the heart of California's Redwood Empire was a study in consistency. From behind the wheel of his yellow LeTourneau log stacker, he watched trees swaying against a bright blue summer sky. In the fall, yellow aspens provided a blast of color in the fog-shrouded forest. Spring brought light-green sprouts of grass poking out of the damp, evergreen-scented ground. Barlow's own season at the mill ended this month when the Seattle lumber company that owns the facility padlocked the gates, leaving more than 40 workers jobless.
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