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Humpty Dumpty

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NEWS
December 10, 1991
First the talk was of reconstituting the former Soviet Union into a new federation of autonomous states. Then the operative term became confederation--a looser union, but still with a political center. Now Russia, Belarus and Ukraine--formerly the Soviet Union's dominant Slavic republics--have declared themselves members of a new commonwealth of fully independent nations. Where it all might end is still very much in doubt. But editorial cartoonists around the world see an obvious parallel.
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NEWS
August 10, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A centuries-old Chinese vase that smashed to pieces when a museum visitor tripped on his shoelace is back on display in England -- as part of an exhibition on art restoration. The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge said that the Qing Dynasty vase had been reassembled from the 113 pieces created when Nick Flynn tumbled down a staircase in January.
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NEWS
September 8, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Poor Manojlo Vukotic. He is a man in the middle in a disintegrating country without a middle. Poor Yugoslavia. Vukotic is the lonely editor of a newspaper called Borba, one of the few federalist voices in a country violently splintering along ethnic lines. "I feel as though I have lost my home," he said. One man's pain mirrors national agony. Under secessionist stress, Yugoslavia has proven too institutionally weak to survive as an integrated nation.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any bricks-and-mortar retailer that believes the Internet can solve all its problems would be sadly mistaken. Ask Egghead.com Inc. Egghead.com started in the 1980s as a retail chain that sold personal-computer software and related items, and 22 of its outlets were in Southern California. But the growth of "big-box" electronics chains such as Best Buy Co. and CompUSA Inc. forced Egghead.com to shutter its 156 stores in 1997-98 and move to the World Wide Web.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1993 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judging by the spiral notebook that Larry Horwitz was carrying under his arm Tuesday, there is a science to being a fair judge at a science fair. Particularly when you're helping pick the winners of $40,000 in cash prizes--a purse that lured the largest crowd of students ever to the 36-year-old California State Science Fair. You need patience and a sense of humor. And a system.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Croatia Airlines has only two planes, a handful of destinations and little name-recognition after less than a week in the air. But there's an appeal to Croatia Airlines, unmatched by any other carrier, that has been filling every flight since its inauguration on Monday. For all its puny size, the airline is a symbol of Croatian independence, and Croatian nationalists revel in symbolism. Like most aspects of life in disintegrating Yugoslavia, air travel has broken down along ethnic lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1995
Medicare is like Humpty Dumpty. If the Republicans push it, we will never be able to put it together again! BOB MORGAN Van Nuys
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1999
In our surreal White House, President Clinton thinks he is the Comeback Kid. I have it from reliable sources that he is really Humpty Dumpty. VIRGINIA MARTIN Desert Hot Springs
BOOKS
January 7, 1990
I enjoyed Leonard Levy's thoughtful review of Robert Bork's "The Tempting of America," and could not resist turning to "Through the Looking Glass" to find this: "When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean--neither more nor less." "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things." "The question is," said Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master--that's all."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992
It is interesting to read and compare two pieces in Calendar about censorship: the first, Pristin's report on PC in Hollywood; the second, on the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon's attempts to censor a television program ("Wildmon Blocks U.S. Airing of British Program," Jan. 2). There's no doubt that PC can go too far, but there's also no question that the greatest threat to free speech and expression in this country comes from those in the Christian right wing. It's a measure of their success that they do keep programs off television and that they have managed to convince mainstream America that PC is the real villain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1999 | DANIEL J.B. MITCHELL, Daniel J.B. Mitchell is a professor of management and public policy at UCLA
The announcement that Xerox Corp. wants to abandon the administration of health insurance is a shocker. Xerox wants to give each of its employees a fixed sum of $5,000 or $6,000 per year and leave it to them to select an insurance carrier. Apparently, employees would have a choice of plans administered by private carriers, not Xerox. Those workers who selected plans costing less than the allowance could pocket the difference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1999
In our surreal White House, President Clinton thinks he is the Comeback Kid. I have it from reliable sources that he is really Humpty Dumpty. VIRGINIA MARTIN Desert Hot Springs
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1995
Medicare is like Humpty Dumpty. If the Republicans push it, we will never be able to put it together again! BOB MORGAN Van Nuys
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., Times Staff Writer
THE TWO CHILDREN FREQUENTLY HUGGED THEIR mother tightly, their innocent smiles masking the horror of Maria Mercado's past. There should be three children. A little girl, 7 years old now, can no longer live with her mother. The girl is growing up somewhere in Los Angeles, but authorities decided she would be unsafe with Mercado. Beatings, sometimes with a wire hanger or an electrical cord, left the girl bloody, her swollen little body broken and her life at risk. "It was a horrible case, horrible," Mercado, 36, said in Spanish, her eyes moist at the memory of what she did just a few years ago. "Physically, she looked exactly like me. But I didn't feel that love that you normally feel when you look at your child."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1993 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judging by the spiral notebook that Larry Horwitz was carrying under his arm Tuesday, there is a science to being a fair judge at a science fair. Particularly when you're helping pick the winners of $40,000 in cash prizes--a purse that lured the largest crowd of students ever to the 36-year-old California State Science Fair. You need patience and a sense of humor. And a system.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992
It is interesting to read and compare two pieces in Calendar about censorship: the first, Pristin's report on PC in Hollywood; the second, on the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon's attempts to censor a television program ("Wildmon Blocks U.S. Airing of British Program," Jan. 2). There's no doubt that PC can go too far, but there's also no question that the greatest threat to free speech and expression in this country comes from those in the Christian right wing. It's a measure of their success that they do keep programs off television and that they have managed to convince mainstream America that PC is the real villain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1991
Well, it finally has happened. Linda Bernhardt will have to face the people who elected her to the San Diego City Council in a recall election. Somehow, inevitably, justice seems to prevail, even though the wheels grind very slow. Ms. Bernhardt is the "Milli Vanilli" of the San Diego political scene. She "lipsynced" her way to the City Council. She told the voters what they wanted to hear. This whole scenario kind of reminds me of a nursery rhyme that goes something like this: After a certain person fell off the wall and from grace "All the King's horses (the Sierra Club)
NEWS
March 16, 1986
After J. Hillis Miller "deconstructs," who's going to reconstruct the English language at UC Irvine? Your story on this Yale professor of English and comparative literature only proves that if one builds a bit of mystique about an esoteric subject, and does it with style, it becomes quite salable. As a taxpayer, I can only hope there is some practical benefit to the students that enriches our future society by learning from Miller. After all, for a salary of $91,000, plus a low-interest housing loan, one should receive more than "glazed eyes," and students saying, "I don't think anybody understands it."
NEWS
December 10, 1991
First the talk was of reconstituting the former Soviet Union into a new federation of autonomous states. Then the operative term became confederation--a looser union, but still with a political center. Now Russia, Belarus and Ukraine--formerly the Soviet Union's dominant Slavic republics--have declared themselves members of a new commonwealth of fully independent nations. Where it all might end is still very much in doubt. But editorial cartoonists around the world see an obvious parallel.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Poor Manojlo Vukotic. He is a man in the middle in a disintegrating country without a middle. Poor Yugoslavia. Vukotic is the lonely editor of a newspaper called Borba, one of the few federalist voices in a country violently splintering along ethnic lines. "I feel as though I have lost my home," he said. One man's pain mirrors national agony. Under secessionist stress, Yugoslavia has proven too institutionally weak to survive as an integrated nation.
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